Information Literacy through the eyes of Teachers And Librarians

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Quezon City Librarians Association Inc sponsored forum on information literacy. Forum speaker is Ms. Elvie B. Lapuz of University of the Philippines Diliman Library.

Quezon City Librarians Association Inc sponsored forum on information literacy. Forum speaker is Ms. Elvie B. Lapuz of University of the Philippines Diliman Library.

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  • Echo of the two training programs I attended in 2007 I am expected to share things I have learned from the two programs This Lecture is a perfect opportunity to reach out to library staff and students
  • Ultimately, information literate people are those who have learned to learn. They know how to learn because they know how information is organized, how to find information, and how to use information in such a way that others can learn from them . (American Library Association, 1989)
  • The application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of information so it can be used to construct personal meaning (Laverty, 1998) Information literacy is critical thinking Information literacy is not just computer literacy – many of our students may be computer-savvy but not information-savvy Knowing what information is needed, knowing how to get it, and how to use it are key to information literacy Showing how we exercise information literacy in real-life situations will help students better understand not only the concepts but also the importance of information literacy skills Many primary and secondary schools recognize information literacy as critical to student success (see Big6 and SOS , for example) and librarians are playing important roles in promoting information literacy
  • The seven headline skills 1. The ability to recognise a need for information 2. The ability to distinguish ways in which the information ‘gap’ may be addressed ® knowledge of appropriate kinds of resources, both print and non-print ® selection of resources with ‘best fit’ for task at hand ® the ability to understand the issues affecting accessibility of sources 3. The ability to construct strategies for locating information ® to articulate information need to match against resources ® to develop a systematic method appropriate for the need ® to understand the principles of construction and generation of databases 4. The ability to locate and access information ® to develop appropriate searching techniques (e.g. use of Boolean) ® to use communication and information technologies, including terms international academic networks ® to use appropriate indexing and abstracting services, citation indexes and databases ® to use current awareness methods to keep up to date 5. The ability to compare and evaluate information obtained from different sources ® awareness of bias and authority issues ® awareness of the peer review process of scholarly publishing ® appropriate extraction of information matching the information need 6. The ability to organise, apply and communicate information to others in ways appropriate to the situation ® to cite bibliographic references in project reports and theses ® to construct a personal bibliographic system ® to apply information to the problem at hand ® to communicate effectively using appropriate medium ® to understand issues of copyright and plagiarism 7. The ability to synthesise and build upon existing information, contributing to the creation of new knowledge
  • The Big 6 is a six step model that is used to solve an information problem, whether the problem is academic ("How will I write my History Day paper?") or a life-skill question ("What should we do on Friday night?"). We are in the middle of an "information explosion".  Did you know that "more information has been produced in the last 30 years than in the previous 5,000" (Eisenberg & Berkowitz 3)?  With so much information available, you must know not only how to access the information but also know what to do with the information once you found it.  This is called "Information Literacy".  Using the Big 6 will provide you with a framework to do research.  Let's pretend that you have new hobby....deep sea fishing.  You decide one day to go fishing in New Hampshire.  But there's a problem.  You've never been to New Hampshire. Would you just get in your car and drive and hope to get to New Hampshire?  Probably not!  You might end up in Disney World!  So, what would you need  to help you drive to New Hampshire?  Your most important and helpful tool will be a map.  The Big 6 is like a map.  It gives you steps to follow to help you successfully research an information problem. The Big6 is an information and technology literacy model and curriculum, implemented in thousands of schools – K through higher education. Some people call the Big6 an information problem-solving strategy because with the Big6, students are able to handle any problem, assignment, decision or task. Task definition – defining the task and identifying the information needed to complete the task Information seeking strategies – identifying the possible resources and selecting the best ones Location and access – locating sources and finding information within the resources Use of information – reading, hearing, viewing in order to extract relevant information Synthesis – organizing the information and presenting the final project or product in an appropriate format Evaluation – judging both the process and the product This model has great application not only for solving information problem, but also for doing assignments and using real life applications
  • Empowering Eight (E8), an Information Literacy Model was developed at this workshop organized jointly by IFLA -ALP and the National Institute of Library & Information Sciences (NILIS) of Sri Lanka. There were participants representing ten South and Southeast Asian countries. The objective of the workshop was to enhance the resource-based learning in these countries by sensitizing the participants to Information Literacy, which as a concept has not taken roots in majority of the countries in the region. When a plethora of IL models are already available, one may question why the wheel is being re-invented. Re-inventing the wheel or developing another model is essential because of the composite culture and local conditions in these countries. If an existing model used in a developed country is imposed, it would be difficult for the stakeholders to understand the philosophical roots behind the model. Therefore, the workshop participants, throughout five days worked from identifying the need of IL through comparison of different models to building the E8 to suit the local needs of the region.
  • Cultural literacy is the ability to converse fluently in the idioms , allusions and informal content which creates and constitutes a dominant culture . From being familiar with street signs to knowing historical references to understanding the most recent slang, literacy demands interaction with the culture and reflection of it. Knowledge of a canonical set of literature is not sufficient in and of itself when engaging with others in a society, as life is interwoven with art, expression, history and experience. Cultural literacy requires familiarity with a broad range of trivia and implies the use of that trivia in the creation of a communal language and collective knowledge. Cultural literacy stresses the knowledge of those pieces of information which content creators will assume the audience already possesses. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_literacy
  • In other words, a culturally literate Filipino knows not only how to read and write, nor only how to survive in Philippine society, but also what it means to be a Filipino and how to live life fruitfully in a globalized world. Since all Filipinos have at least one relative or friend living abroad, it has become very important that students learn what it means to interact with non-Filipinos. We can appreciate the culture of another country, however, only if we know what our own culture is. The National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) has been working closely with DepEd to ensure that all high school graduates will at least know and appreciate the most basic elements of our culture. With DepEd Usec Vilma Labrador in charge of both the NCCA and the programs of DepEd, the blending of curriculum with cultural concerns is now seamless. There are, of course, innumerable details left to work out. In the area of literature, for example, the use of only excellent texts in English and Filipino high school textbooks has finally been assured. Based on a 1985 DepEd project entitled “The Canon of Philippine Literature,” the requirement will force textbook writers not to use their own works as examples of good writing. Many of the so-called literary texts done by non-award-winning writers have grammatical and stylistic errors. No wonder students do not learn good English or good Filipino! Starting June 2010, first year students will be exposed only to well-written English and Filipino.
  • Awareness of the range of uses of global networked information resources and services Ability to retrieve specific types of information from the network using a range of information discovery tools Ability to manipulate networked information by combining it with other resources, enhancing it Ability to use networked information to analyze and resolve both work and personal related decisions and obtain services that will enhance overall quality of life An understanding of the role and uses of networked information in problem solving and performing basic life activiities
  • These standards provide a framework for embedding information literacy in the design and teaching of educational programs, and for assessing the information literate individual. They extend the information literacy progress of educators, teacher librarians and librarians, in the school and Technological and Further Education sectors. This provides higher education with an opportunity to articulate the standards with those of the other education sectors so that a continuum of expectation can be developed for students at all levels. The standards outline the process by which academics, librarians, and others, pinpoint specific indicators which identify a student as information literate. Students also will find the standards useful, because they provide a framework for their interaction with information in their environment. This will help to develop their awareness of the need for a metacognitive approach to learning, making them conscious of the explicit actions required for recognition of need, gathering, analysing, and using information. All students are expected to demonstrate all of the standards, but not everyone will demonstrate them to the same level or at the same time
  • Stand alone courses – may or may not be credit bearing; maybe in seminar format; students may not enroll in them if the courses are not required Online tutorials – from the simple to the complex and focus on issues such as online searching, evaluating web sites, citing sources, information ethics, and broader information literacy topics Workbooks – students will be required to complete a workbook before starting the net semester. The workbook aims at helping students become independent users of information. Workbooks can be customized versions for the areas of business, criminal justice, education, etc. Course related instruction – to include library research workshops, faculty instruction, Internet training workshops. Collaboration with faculty to develop course integrated assignments. Librarians, highlight discipline specific resources related to particular courses Course integrated instruction – many academic library programs are turning to course integrated instruction to provide users with information literacy skills in the context of actual information needs. This approach makes information literacy skills instruction inherently more meaningful than when such skills are taught out of context.
  • Web 2.0 tools also provide us with access to different kinds of professional learning experiences.
  • useful for disseminating general and personal information, community news, and opinions and commentary Can be used to increase the information literacy skills of everyone in the campus community For example, a blogger could submit posts including screenshots or video tutorials, detailing techniques to improve research using library databases A post could also be used to provide links to resources that promote information literacy A library blog developed to support an information literacy initiative would need to be integrated into or developed for specific courses This would require collaboration with faculty= with them introducing and leading their students to these blogs As instructional technologists, we should also be well versed with other Web 2.0 technologies such as RSS and news aggregators -
  • RSS is a family of Web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video in a standardized format. [2] An RSS document (which is called a "feed," "web feed," [3] or "channel") includes full or summarized text plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. Web feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate works quickly and automatically. They benefit readers who want to subscribe to timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place. RSS feeds can be read using software called an "RSS reader," "feed reader," or an " aggregator ," which can be web-based or desktop-based . A standardized XML file format allows the information to be published once and viewed by many different programs. The user subscribes to a feed by entering the feed's link into the reader or by clicking an RSS icon in a browser that initiates the subscription process. The RSS reader checks the user's subscribed feeds regularly for new work, downloads any updates that it finds, and provides a user interface to monitor and read the feeds. The initials "RSS" are used to refer to the following formats: "Really Simple Syndication (RSS 2.0)", " RDF Site Summary (RSS 1.0 and RSS 0.90)", or "Rich Site Summary (RSS 0.91)".
  • A tool that can facilitate and increase communication by and among students Based on the concept of bringing together a community of learners to develop a single resource that benefits all members through the sharing of information A form of community writing tool – each member of the community is able to add new content as well as edit existing content A librarian could create a wiki for a specific course and then add content appropriate to the course and its information literacy outcomes The wiki could contain objectives for the course’s information literacy component and provide details of the assignment created for the course that will help students develop information literacy skills
  • enable students and teachers to share information with anyone anytime. If a student is absent, he or she can download the podcast of the recorded lesson. Teachers may also create podcasts to be used as a preparation tool for students. This would be pedagogically equivalent to having students read a text before a lesson. It can be a tool for teachers or administrators to communicate curriculum, assignments and other information with parents and the community. Teachers can record book talks , vocabulary or foreign language lessons, international pen pal letters (podcast pals!), music performance, interviews, debates. Podcasting can be a publishing tool for student oral presentations. Video podcasts can be used in all these ways as well.
  • Del.icio.us can be used as a research tool to help students to organise what they find and bookmark easily, accessible anywhere CiteULike – a free online service to organize your academic papers
  • Social networks become instructional tool that permit rapid development of course content and served as collaborative space for students. They served as a bridge between common information literacy skills with which the students are familiar and skills that are considered essential in an information literacy environment.
  • Remembering all the folks and creating experiences for them Providing for meeting venues either online or in the physical world where needs for information and entertainment are met Human who wants to continue seeing the old face of the library and not only the services it provides
  • There is the issue of radical trust – can we trust materials from the wikipedia?
  • The “blogosphere” can be viewed as a kind of global brain and a vital part of online culture. Blogs are primary sources and can contain some of the most current opinion on the web and are becoming a valid source to get the latest ideas about a subject. However, the task of selecting from the over 72 million blogs will require some assistance from librarians. Whom do you trust? Tools like Technorati and Blogpulse can be useful aids. Advice on the evaluation of blogs can be gained from Kathy Schrock’s Guide for Educators Critical Evaluation Surveys & Resources. http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalblog.html Blogs can help to develop writing skills, encourage community and reflection, and thereby assist deep learning. With the support of academic staff (particularly in agreeing the software to be used – e.g. Blogger or Blackboard) they could be used in our teaching, with student content being collected into the teacher’s aggregator. Students doing major pieces of research could be encouraged to keep a blog as a way of recording progress, managing their time and reflection. They could be used to build up evidence of their progress and to gather opinions from peers or instructors.
  • RSS feeds provide the glue which link us to the content which we want to read. The feeds can allow students and researchers to subscribe to regular content from news services, blogs and relevant content from databases. They can create their own information world, choosing their content which then comes automatically to them, keeping them up to date. Thy may choose to use an aggregating service like Bloglines which collects the feeds from all their sources into a common format for swift browsing. Promotion of these to advanced researchers facilitates access and regular update of content concerning their chosen subjects. Instead of looking for specific types of information, let the most current information find you.
  • Wikipedia’s popularity is such that we cannot prevent its use by our students. A recent Pew/Internet report from the USA showed that 36% of online American adults consulted Wikipedia.We should acknowledge its legitimacy as a starting point for research but teach how it should be measured against other reference sources, and understanding its strengths and weaknesses. There have been problems with bogus posts. Rules and guidelines have had to be imposed and an arbitration committee set up to settle entry disputes. Robots also troll around the site looking for obvious vandalism. Despite this, Wikipedia can be a wonderful way of showing how easy it is to post information on the web, and for considering how knowledge is built up. It leads to the central question of the validity of any piece of information and why we should trust it. In a Web 2.0 world this will become increasingly important for users to understand. The creation of wikis to encourage group work and peer review is being trialled with the assistance of academic staff again after decisions of which software to use are made. e.g. Moodle, PBWiki, or Blackboard?
  • We need to teach ways of searching for podcasts e.g. http://podcasts.yahoo.com. Librarians are already using them for library instruction, especially for distance learners. Access can be via iTunes, allowing users to jump around chapters. Podcasts can be effective for academic star performers with wonderful voices! They allows students to time-shift and can be used in a car, while jogging….anywhere.
  • These services make book marking much easier and portable between PCs. Connotea, CiteULike and del.icio.us are the most well-known. Del.icio.us can be used as a research tool to help students to organise what they find and bookmark easily, accessible anywhere. It can assist referencing and encourages them to tag, which is central to the linking of ideas, and aids sharing of resources. Individuals will use different tags according to their own interests, but when these are shared with others, this tagging can expose new links, which in turn lead to discovery of further resources.
  • LibraryThing Librarians who want to trial social networking tools should first consider LibraryThing and Library 2.0. The former enables the storage of details about books which have been read. (i.e.cataloguing).Brief descriptions, reviews and tags can be constructed. The information is then shared with others who have read the book . This may foster alternative and additional reading, based on their opinions and favourites. Rather like a book club, this could be used with groups of students to encourage reading, sharing of favourites and critical review. Library 2.0
  • What is del.icio.us? del.icio.us is a collection of favorites - yours and everyone else's. You can use del.icio.us to: Keep links to your favorite articles, blogs, music, reviews, recipes, and more, and access them from any computer on the web. Share favorites with friends, family, coworkers, and the del.icio.us community. Discover new things. Everything on del.icio.us is someone's favorite -- they've already done the work of finding it. So del.icio.us is full of bookmarks about technology, entertainment, useful information, and more. Explore and enjoy. del.icio.us is a social bookmarking website -- the primary use of del.icio.us is to store your bookmarks online, which allows you to access the same bookmarks from any computer and add bookmarks from anywhere, too. On del.icio.us, you can use tags to organize and remember your bookmarks, which is a much more flexible system than folders. You can also use del.icio.us to see the interesting links that your friends and other people bookmark, and share links with them in return. You can even browse and search del.icio.us to discover the cool and useful bookmarks that everyone else has saved -- which is made easy with tags.
  • LibraryThing Librarians who want to trial social networking tools should first consider LibraryThing and Library 2.0. The former enables the storage of details about books which have been read. (i.e.cataloguing).Brief descriptions, reviews and tags can be constructed. The information is then shared with others who have read the book . This may foster alternative and additional reading, based on their opinions and favourites. Rather like a book club, this could be used with groups of students to encourage reading, sharing of favourites and critical review. Library 2.0 YouTube This service, although limited to a ten minute format and of variable technical quality, can be used to create our own YouTube videos for promotional programmes and tutorials. Some of the best examples have used students as presenters, and their involvement in planning is crucial. Librarians now also have an interesting teaching resource in YouTube material for use in our teaching to trigger discussion. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFAWR6hzZek
  • Flickr is a photo sharing website and web services suite, and an online community platform. It was one of the earliest Web 2.0 applications. In addition to being a popular Web site for users to share personal photographs, the service is widely used by bloggers as a photo repository. Its popularity has been fueled by its innovative online community tools that allow photos to be tagged and browsed by folksonomic means. It hosts over two billion images
  • YouTube This service, although limited to a ten minute format and of variable technical quality, can be used to create our own YouTube videos for promotional programmes and tutorials. Some of the best examples have used students as presenters, and their involvement in planning is crucial. Librarians now also have an interesting teaching resource in YouTube material for use in our teaching to trigger discussion. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFAWR6hzZek
  • Data smog! Academic librarians can and should play a leadership role in faculty development efforts on their campuses.
  • Stand alone courses – may or may not be credit bearing; maybe in seminar format; students may not enroll in them if the courses are not required Online tutorials – from the simple to the complex and focus on issues such as online searching, evaluating web sites, citing sources, information ethics, and broader information literacy topics Workbooks – students will be required to complete a workbook before starting the net semester. The workbook aims at helping students become independent users of information. Workbooks can be customized versions for the areas of business, criminal justice, education, etc. Course related instruction – to include library research workshops, faculty instruction, Internet training workshops. Collaboration with faculty to develop course integrated assignments. Librarians, highlight discipline specific resources related to particular courses Course integrated instruction – many academic library programs are turning to course integrated instruction to provide users with information literacy skills in the context of actual information needs. This approach makes information literacy skills instruction inherently more meaningful than when such skills are taught out of context.
  • Your first step is to identify learning outcomes for the session. Learning outcomes can be aimed at different learning levels. A learning outcome beginning with the word “evaluate” will involve a higher level of learning than one beginning with the word “identify” Task based = “at the end of this session students will be able to make efficient use of the Voyager to find journal articles from reading lists Generic = “at the end of this session students will be able to perform effectively in small-group work” Ensure the learning outcomes are stated in student-centered terms. They should focus on what the student will be able to do rather than what the have taught them. In theory, there are three parts to a learning outcome: Task: an observable action stated in active terms such as to “list, identify, state, select, solve, calculate, write, demonstrate, match, translate or distinguish between’, Avoid passive terms such as understand or appreciate Standards: indicate the proficiencies which the student much achieve; they should be measurable. They can be of three main types: accuracy, speed, quality, such as “without error” “within ten minutes” “in coherent and well organized fashion” Conditions: describe how the task will be carried out, as as the range of problems to solve, the tools or equipment to be used, any special aids or manuals provided, environmental conditions, special physical demands, such as “without reference to a manual’ by checking the provided chart” “by using the evaluation checklist
  • Existing knowledge: learners will already have developed strategies for finding information, such as relying heavily on Google. You will need to design lessons which build on existing experience but create opportunities to assimilate or accommodate new techniques to old understanding Skill levels: within any group, skills level will vary. Your planning will need to recognize and accommodate the variations in skill levels across the group. Consider auditing skills through a pre-session questionnaire. Motivation: The most effective learning takes place when it is based on real needs and placed within authentic contexts. Try to optimize relevance and timeliness, for example by basing the session on a forthcoming assignment Learning preferences: People learn in different ways. Different learning formats such as worksheets or online tutorials can also cater for different preferences. You can cater for a number of learning preferences within the same session.
  • Print and online resources: Audience Response Technology (ART) = same technology used in Who wants to be a millionaire? Virtual learning environment like Blackboard, software packages that convert documents into web based teaching packages Flip charts and whiteboards: ideal for interactive sessions Music: can be used to set a particular mood, at the start, at the end or even during the session Powerpoint presentation: popular and effective visual tool for teacher led presentations Video: provides a variation in the presentation style
  • Be confident: good planning, know your material inside-out, practice your delivery, use instructor notes, don’t be fazed by mistakes, try to relax, be keen, be enthusiastic! Be clear and coherent: make your opening effective and unhurried, let your audience know what to expect (have an outline), use structuring tactics (signposts, frames, foci, links) View content from the standpoint of the audience Avoid use of technical language and abbreviations Repeat key points Provide a summary Don’t leave out chunks of explanations by assuming the audience is familiar with basic points of reference Explain acronyms, abbreviations and technical terms Repetition of key points and phrases can be useful to get essential information across Make your ending conclusive and effective Engage your audience – be inclusive and involving, ask questions, use activities to break up session and encourage active learning, when using teaching aids, face and talk to the audience, not your aid, maintain eye contact Be time conscious – rehearse in order to gauge overall timing, finish within alloted time, be alert to signs of restlessness and inattentiveness Be yourself: your voice is your greatest natural asset, speak clearly and loudly enough to be heard, use intonation, speak at a steady pace, use humour, use expressive body language and speech rhythms but avoid mannerisms which may be irritating to your audience, dress comfortably and appropriately Enjoy yourself – and your audience will too.
  • Reflective practice – a means by which practitioners can develop a greater self awareness about the nature and impact of their performance, an awareness that creates opportunities for professional growth and development. To improve and enhance teaching
  • Likewise, it is very “2.0″ to integrate information literacy instruction into campus educational opportunities outside the classroom, e.g., residence hall and Greek life education, and as part of staff development and faculty development programs sponsored by units such as Human Resources and the Center for Teaching Excellence. Both foster integration, interaction, user feedback, and permeable boundaries between library and other campus services - the very heart of the “Library 2.0″ concept; the heart of the library as “open system.”
  • The meshing of traditional library skills and being techno savvy. A blended librarian, is an academic librarian who combines the traditional skill set of librarianship with the information technologist’s hardware/software skills, and the instructional or educational designer’s ability to apply technology appropriately in the teaching-learning process.
  • Educators must provide students with opportunities to learn how to find information within sources and how to evaluate information for credibility and usefulness within the context of the larger information problem solving process Should be integrated in the school curriculum as well being reinforced outside the school IL is valuable to attain success both today and in the information society of the future.

Transcript

  • 1. INFORMATION LITERACY through the eyes of Teachers and Librarians ELVIRA B. LAPUZ [email_address]
  • 2. Objectives
    • To institutionalize teaching of information literacy in schools and libraries
    • To enhance the information literacy capabilities of teachers and librarians
    • To have information literate teachers, librarians and students
  • 3. The concept of Information Literacy
    • First discussed in the U.S. in 1974 in response to the rapidly increasing amount of information and the complexities of doing search
    • Paul Zurkowski, president of Information Industry Association introduced the concept
  • 4. http://www.escuela.ca/information_literacy.gif Information literacy defined…
  • 5. To encourage Information Literacy ask the students…
    • to summarize or paraphrase what was read
    • to pin-point the main idea of what was read
    • to compare/contrast information from two or more sources
    • to read and evaluate a piece of writing or specific information – do you agree or disagree?
    • to write a well researched essay
    • to find information on the internet
    • to use library resources
    • to use a library database
    • to determine the usefulness of a source
    • to comment on the validity, the legitimacy, or the relevance of a source
    • to find a “scholarly” source
    • to make connections between readings
    • to cite sources
    -- Dr. Judith Kizzie & Laura Yoo
  • 6. “ to be information literate, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.” - Final Report of American Library Association Presidential Committee on Information Literacy, 1989. p.1.
  • 7. http://www.library.mmu.ac.uk/bigblue/images/image32.gif
  • 8. Key IL skills
    • Recognizing the need for information
    • Able to find and evaluate information
    • Can think critically to synthesize and assimilate information
    • Can communicate information effectively
    • Comfortable using the necessary tools and technologies
    • Understands and applies ethical principles
  • 9. It is all about… http://sites.google.com/site/bethhueyportfoliosite/_/rsrc/1235585868056/Home/information%20literacy.jpg
  • 10. Critical Thinking
    • the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information … as a guide to belief and action.
    • (www.criticalthinking.org/aboutCT/definingCT.shtml)
  • 11. Be a critical thinker by …
    • Being observant
    • Learning from experience
    • Reflection
    • Reasoning
    • Communicating
  • 12. It includes the ability to…
    • set goals
    • adjust strategies
    • carry out tasks
    • distinguish fact from opinion
    • establish the authority of sources
    • assess accuracy and relevance of information
    • detect bias and underlying assumptions
  • 13. &quot;Within today's information society, the most important learning outcome for all students is their being able to function as independent lifelong learners. The essential enabler to reaching that goal is information literacy.&quot; Breivik, Patricia. &quot;Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning: The Magical Partnership.&quot; International Lifelong Learning Conference, Central Queensland University, 2000. 7 December 2001. <http://lifelonglearning.cqu.edu.au/2000/home.htm>
  • 14. Models of Information Literacy
    • SCONUL’s Seven (7) Pillars of Information Literacy
    • Eisenberg and Berkowitz’s Big 6 Model
    • IFLA’s Empowering 8
  • 15.  
  • 16. The Big 6 ™ Model www.wlma.org /.../traincbas/research-models.html
  • 17. IFLA’s Empowering 8 Model
    • Identify
    • Explore
    • Select
    • Organize
    • Create
    • Present
    • Assess
    • Apply
  • 18. IL and other literacy Source: http://blogs.ubc.ca/dean/files/2009/02/bloom1.gif
  • 19. Cultural Literacy
    • the ability to understand and appreciate the similarities and differences in the customs, values, and beliefs of one’s own culture and the cultures of others
    http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/__data/assets/image/0005/5981/Polistina1a.jpg
  • 20. Cultural Literacy
    • “ the ability to be informed by beliefs and behaviors that have been shared from one generation to another in an oral or written form. Cultural literacy can create a knowledge and awareness that brings distinct commitment to social justice, responsibility to defend human dignity, and respect for cultures and languages associated with different nations and lifestyles.”
    - from the American National Council of the Professors of Educational Administration
  • 21. Visual literacy
    • “ to understand and use images, including the ability to think, learn and express oneself in terms of images” [Braden & Hortin, 1982]
    • Ability to understand and use visual images in our daily lives
  • 22. Media literacy
    • The ability to use various media to access, analyze and produce information for specific outcomes
    • A media literate person can decode, evaluate, analyze and produce both print and electronic media
    • Recognize the influence of television, film, radio, recorded music, newspapers, and other media
    http://www.glogster.com/media/2/4/41/10/4411002.jpg
  • 23. Computer literacy
    • Knowing/understanding how to use a PC
    • The ability to create and manipulate documents and data via word processing, spreadsheets, databases and other software applications
    • It is NOT about the ability to write computer programs
    http://www.inspirationline.com/images/DogComputer.jpg
  • 24. Digital literacy
    • The ability to understand and use information in multiple formats from a wide range of sources when it is presented via computers or other digital technology, i.e cellphones
    http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1194/1383955080_1cb4b16982.jpg
  • 25. Network literacy
    • An understanding of the systems by which networked information is generated, managed and made available
    http://lonewolflibrarian.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/personal_social_network.jpg
  • 26. Information Literacy Standards
    • Focus on implementing concepts of IL across the curriculum
    • Competency standards that include performance indicators and outcomes based on the acknowledged definition of being information literate, i.e.
      • ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education
      • AASL’s Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning
  • 27. ACRL Competency Standards
    • 5 standards
    • Performance indicators for each standard
    • Outcomes for each indicator
  • 28. ACRL Competency Standards
    • Standard 1- The information literate student determines the nature and extent of the information needed
    • Standard 2 - The information literate student accesses needed information effectively and efficiently
    • Standard 3 - The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.
  • 29.
    • Standard 4 - The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group, uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
    • Standard 5 - The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally
    ACRL Competency Standards
  • 30. Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning
    • AASL (American Association of School Librarians) and AECT (Association of Educational Communications Technology
    • Published in Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning (1988)
    • Nine (9) standards categorized under three (3) headings: Information Literacy, Independent Learning, Social Responsibility
  • 31. Heading 1 : Information Literacy
    • The student who is information literate accesses information efficiently and effectively
    • The student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently
    • The student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively
  • 32. Heading 2 : Independent Learning Standards
    • 4. The student who is an independent learner is information literate and pursues information related to personal interests
    • 5. The student who is an independent learner is information literate and appreciates literature and other creative expressions of information
    • 6. The student who is an independent learner is information literate and strives for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation
  • 33. Heading 3 : Social Responsibility Standards
    • 7. The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and recognizes the importance of information to a democratic society
    • 8. The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and practices ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology
    • 9. The student who contributes to the learning community and to society is information literate and participates effectively in groups to pursue and generate information
  • 34. Information Literacy Instruction (ILI)
    • Stand alone courses or classes
    • Self-paced tutorials
    • Online tutorials
    • Workbooks
    • Course-related instruction
    • Course-integrated instruction
  • 35. IL from the Library
  • 36.  
  • 37. beyond
  • 38. http://www.western.edu/academics/library/information-literacy-program/instruction/Scientific%20Information%20Cycle.jpg
  • 39. Online tutorials
  • 40.  
  • 41.  
  • 42. Guides and how to’s
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45. Guides to citing sources
  • 46. Toolkit for Teaching
  • 47. Typical modules of instruction that meet ACRL Competency Standards
    • Choosing and deciding on a topic
    • Identification of different types of information sources
    • Use of Online Catalog (tutorials on how to use OPAC)
    • How to search databases to find articles
    • Keyword vs. controlled vocabulary searching
    • Complex search instructions
    • Acknowledging and Citing sources properly
    • Internet search engines (Google NOT!)
    • Evaluating information sources
    • What is plagiarism?
  • 48. No more “one shot” IL classes
    • Provide for a variety of approaches to delivering IL
    • Make use of web-based resources that are accessible 24/7
    • Develop free standing IL courses that covers multiple sessions for in-depth exploration and learning
  • 49. Confusion!
  • 50. WEB 2.0
    • the network as platform
    • software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it
    • Thrives on the &quot;architecture of participation&quot;
    • -- [Tim O’Reilly 2006]
  • 51. WEB 2.0
    • “ The phrase Web 2.0 was created by O'Reilly Media to refer to a supposed second generation of Internet-based services that let people collaborate and share information online in a new way—such as social networking sites, wikis, communication tools, and folksonomies…” [Wikipedia 2006]
  • 52.  
  • 53. Web 2.0 tools
    • Blogs
    • RSS feeds
    • Wikis
    • Podcasts and podcasting
    • Social bookmarking
    • Social networking
    • Tagging
  • 54. Blogs
    • Short for web log
    • an online journal where information (not only text, but also audio, photographs and video) is posted on a regular basis and appears in chronological order
    • Way to share one’s thoughts to the world
  • 55.  
  • 56.  
  • 57.  
  • 58. RSS feeds
    • Stands for R eally S imple S yndication
    • Provides the glue that links us to the content we want to read
    • &quot;feed,&quot; &quot;web feed,&quot; or &quot;channel,&quot; containing either a summary of content from an associated web site or the full text
    • often used by bloggers to alert users to new postings
  • 59. wikis
    • type of website that allows collaborative creating, editing and storage of content by a group of users
    • ideal for specific projects and collaborative knowledge sharing, especially if group members are in more than one location
    • Wikipedia – most well known wiki; free online encyclopedia
  • 60.  
  • 61.  
  • 62.  
  • 63. Podcasts
    • Derived from the terms iPod and broadcast
    • a collection of digital media files distributed over the Internet, often using syndication feeds, for playback on portable media players and personal computers
  • 64.  
  • 65. Social bookmarking
    • a method for Internet users to store, organize, search, and manage bookmarks of web pages with the help of metadata – [wikipedia]
    • Can be both public and private
  • 66. Social networks
    • metaphor to connote complex sets of relationships between members of social systems at all scales, from interpersonal to international – [wikipedia]
  • 67. Library 2.0 in the framework of Web 2.0
    • Making use of web 2.0 tools to market and promote library services
    • Give emphasis on user control, radical trust, flexibility and user autonomy
    • Work on real time and asynchronous communication
    • Use social networking sites and multi-media application
  • 68. Library 2.0
    • incorporating aspects of Web 2.0 into the library’s service delivery models
    • making the library’s space (virtual and physical) more interactive, collaborative, and driven by community needs.
    • The basic drive is to get people back into the library by making the library relevant to what they want and need in their daily lives [Cohen 2006]
  • 69. Library 2.0 is about…
    • Creating experiences for users
    • Providing a meeting place
    • Being human – understanding users and getting closer to the user
    • User generated content
    • Radical trust
    • Community of users and staff
  • 70. Fichter, Darlene. “Web 2.0, Library 2.0 and Radical Trust: A First Take.” Blog on the Side. <http://library2.usask.ca/~fichter/blog_on_the_side/2006/04/web-2.html>.
  • 71. Library 2.0 tools: blogs
    • Help to develop writing skills, encourage creation of communities and reflections
    • Can be used in teaching with student contents being collected into the teachers aggregators
    • Keeping a blog as a way of recording progress and managing time
    • Can be used to build up evidence and gather opinions from peers or instructors
  • 72. Library 2.0 tools: RSS feeds
    • Feeds can allow students and researchers to subscribe to regular content from news services
    • Students can create their own information world
    • Instead of looking for specific types of information, the most current information find you
  • 73. Library 2.0 tools: wikis
    • No preventing its use
    • A good starting point for research
    • Encourage group work and peer review
    • A good way to introduce how easy it is to be posting information on the web
  • 74.  
  • 75. Library 2.0 tools: podcasts
    • Can be used for library instructions, especially for distance learners
    • Can be effective in accommodating school performances
    • Allows time shifting and can be used in non-conventional learning set-ups
  • 76. Library 2.0 tools: social bookmarking
    • Can be used as a research tool to help students organize materials they find and bookmark
    • Assists in referencing and encourages tagging
    • Aids in sharing resources
  • 77. Sharing/organizing in LibraryThing
  • 78. “ bookmarks” in del.icio.us
  • 79. Library 2.0 tools: social networking
    • Venues for students to explore collaborative research endeavors
    • Can be used to organize and present class content
    • Tagging can become part of critical thinking, creating links which involves evaluation, categorizing and formulating keywords
  • 80.  
  • 81.  
  • 82. Library News on Flickr
  • 83. Library Instruction on YouTube
  • 84.  
  • 85.  
  • 86. http://pwoessner.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/networked-teacher.jpg Networked teacher
  • 87. Web 2.0, Library 2.0 and IL
    • Helps in connecting the library with the Net generation
    • Provide for new tools to enhance delivery of library service
    • This is a world of perpetual Beta – a work in progress, providing the need to do further experiments and explorations
  • 88. Information Literacy Program
    • More than just teaching how to use the library
    • The goal is to develop information competencies and the skills for life long learning
  • 89. Why plan for an IL Program?
    • There’s just too much information
    • IL skills are essential for life-long learning
    • Recognize the importance of instructions in the search for and use of information
    • Library as the ideal venue for instruction
    • Librarians as instructors and mentors
  • 90. A comprehensive information literacy plan is a concrete proof of an institutions commitment to educating users of information.
  • 91. Learning institution of all kinds should initiate efforts to plan a comprehensive information literacy program for all its constituents.
  • 92. IL and management
    • Activities should clearly focus on an IL standard or standards
    • Seek assistance of experts when designing and formulating a new course
    • Be resourceful and creative in promoting the IL program
    • Work as a team but identify someone to lead the group
    • Be clear about IL objectives in any type of activity
    • Always put in mind that the IL program is not the sole domain of the library
  • 93. The development of an Information Literacy program relies on transforming a library based program into a school campus enterprise with wider ownership and engagement, seeking not just buy-in but leadership and engagement beyond the walls of the library -- Information Literacy Programs : Success and Challenges / Durisin, 2002
  • 94.  
  • 95.  
  • 96.  
  • 97.  
  • 98. Planning the Plan
    • Identify and analyze information needs of the community of learners
    • Decide on timelines and schedules
    • Decide on who shall write the plan
  • 99. Planning to write
    • Start with an outline
    • Identify audience
    • Consult with experts in the fine art of writing
  • 100. Write the Plan
    • Work on the key point of the plan
    • Write the body of the plan in such a way that it will serve as a manual for implementing the IL program
    • Adhere to set timetables
  • 101. Assessment and evaluation
    • to ensure that an IL plan is well implemented, mechanisms should be formulated to determine how well it is meeting its goals and by letting all concerned know how it is doing
    • Consider both quantitative and qualitative methods of assessment
    • Be open for feedbacks and evaluations
  • 102. Market the plan
    • Get approval from the approving body
    • Provide reports and updates
    • Introduce and promote the plan to all members of the community
  • 103. Information Literacy Instruction (ILI)
    • Stand alone courses or classes
    • Self-paced tutorials
    • Online tutorials
    • Workbooks
    • Course-related instruction
    • Course-integrated instruction
  • 104. No more “one shot” IL classes
    • Provide for a variety of approaches to delivering IL
    • Make use of web-based resources that are accessible 24/7
    • Develop free standing IL courses that covers multiple sessions for in-depth exploration and learning
  • 105. Library orientation
    • To inform students about the services provided by the library and when, where and how these can be accessed
    • The students first meeting with the library staff
    • Timing is crucial!
  • 106. Typical contents
    • Location of the library and operating hours
    • Library rules and regulations
    • Services offered
    • Resources available
    • Instructions on how to locate materials
    • Borrowing procedures
  • 107. Typical modules of instruction that meet ACRL Competency Standards
    • Choosing and deciding on a topic
    • Identification of different types of information sources
    • Use of Online Catalog (tutorials on how to use OPAC)
    • How to search databases to find articles
    • Keyword vs. controlled vocabulary searching
    • Complex search instructions
    • Acknowledging and Citing sources properly
    • Internet search engines (Google NOT!)
    • Evaluating information sources
    • What is plagiarism?
  • 108. Preparing to teach
    • Plan your teaching session
    • Formulate your learning outcomes
    • Items in your Lesson Plan
      • Course title
      • Details of the session
      • Required pre-session preparations
      • Instructors notes
  • 109. Plan your teaching session
    • Effective planning = successful teaching
      • Allow enough time
      • Think about how much students can learn; don’t make session too content heavy
      • Be creative and innovative!
  • 110. Formulate your learning outcomes
    • Clear and precise statements of what the learner will know or be able to do after attending the session
    • Task based or generic
    • Three parts: task, standards and conditions
  • 111. Think about your learners
    • Existing knowledge
    • Skill levels
    • Motivation
    • Learning preferences
    • Support needed
    • Be flexible!
  • 112. Teaching aids
    • Print and online teaching resources
    • Flip charts and whiteboards
    • Music
    • Powerpoint presentations
    • Handouts
    • Video
  • 113. Presentations using Powerpoint ™
    • Limit information to key points only
    • Limit the number of lines
    • Use keywords and short sentences
    • Use normal sentence case and readable fonts
    • Avoid abbreviations and acronyms
    • Do not apologize for any slide. Redo if needed
    • Do spell check and proof read
    • Use clip art and pictures to enhance content
    • Include video clips to make it more interesting
  • 114. Handouts
    • Useful as memory aids
    • Encourages good note taking practice
    • Allow students to recap on key points during a presentation
    • May take the form of information sheets, worksheets, workbook or evaluation sheets
  • 115. When preparing handouts
    • Use readable fonts, at least 12pt Arial or Times New Roman
    • Use bold texts for headings
    • Avoid excessive use of capitalization, underlining and italicization
    • Leave space between texts
    • Use good paper
    • Keep an electronic copy for distribution, if requested
  • 116. Presentation techniques
    • Be confident!
    • Be clear and coherent
    • Engage your audience
    • Be aware of the time
    • Be yourself
    • Enjoy yourself!
  • 117. Evaluate teaching
    • Reflective practice
    • Feedback from students
    • Feedbacks from peers
  • 118. think about instruction…
      • ILI is integrated across the curriculum and provides opportunities for instructions outside the classroom
      • The library as an instructional center on campus and serves as the hub for campus-wide efforts of helping students acquire information skills
  • 119. Librarians concerned with IL
    • Thoroughly aware of the needs of the Net Generation
    • Gives 2.0 tools a try to connect to this generation
    • Explains how information is created and communicated and help students develop a sense of context when using information
    • Encourages critical thinking
    • The “Blended Librarian”
    • Librarian 2.0? 
  • 120. Bear in mind…
    • Information Literacy is more than just a set of skills
    • Information Literacy teachings should be integrated in the school curriculum
    • Information Literacy is essential to student success
  • 121. References:
    • Eisenberg, Michael (2004). Information Literacy : Essential Skills for the Information Age. Westport, Conn. Libraries Unimited.
    • Grafstein, Ann. Information literacy and technology : an examination of some issues. Portal : Libraries and the Academy vol. 7, no. 1 (2007), pp. 51-64
    • Information literacy meets Library 2.0. (2008). Godwin, Peter and Jo Parker. London : Facet Publishing.
    • Martin, A., and Rader, H. (2002). Information and IT Literacy : enabling learning in the 21 st century. London : Facet.
    • Taylor, J. (2006). Information Literacy and the School Media Center. Wesport, Connecticut : Libraries Unlimited.
    • UNESCO Information for All Programme. Understanding information literacy : a primer. Paris : UNESCO, 2007.
  • 122. ELVIRA B. LAPUZ University of the Philippines [email_address]