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Resources   natural capital
 

Resources natural capital

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Resources   natural capital Resources natural capital Presentation Transcript

  • cebitz. n coScie m 3.2 Resources - natural capital cebitz. n co Scie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.1: Explain the concept of resources in terms of natural income. What is natural capital? Natural capital can be thought of as the stock of an ecosystem than can yield a supply valuable ecosystem goods or services Forest along a river may provide a timber crop (goods) but may be more valuable protecting the land from flooding and soil cebitz. erosion (service) n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.1: Explain the concept of resources in terms of natural income. What is natural capital? Another example are tropical seas: Catching fish provides a crop for locals But the tropical sea may be more valuable as an aesthetic cebitz. service for tourism n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.2: Define the terms renewable, replenishable and non‐renewable natural capital. Renewable natural capital Natural resources that have a sustainable yield or harvest equal to or less than their natural productivity; For example, food crops, timber. cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.2: Define the terms renewable, replenishable and non‐renewable natural capital. Replenishable natural capital Non-living natural resources that depend on the energy of the Sun for their replenishment; For example, groundwater. cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.2: Define the terms renewable, replenishable and non‐renewable natural capital. Non-renewable natural capital Natural resources that cannot be replenished within a timescale of the same order as that at which they are taken from the environment and used; For example, fossil fuels. cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.3: Explain the dynamic nature of the concept of a resource. The resources we use change over time For centuries wood was the main source of energy for most of Europe as well as the rest of the World. During the last century oil has become the most important energy resource cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.3: Explain the dynamic nature of the concept of a resource. The resources we use change over time However concerns about the environmental consequences of burning greater amounts of fossil fuels has led to an increased use of renewable energy resources cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.3: Explain the dynamic nature of the concept of a resource. The resources we use change over time Choice of which resources are used are often tied to questions of economic costs and available supply cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.4: Discuss the view that the environment can have its own intrinsic value. Does the environment have value for its own sake? cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.4: Discuss the view that the environment can have its own intrinsic value. Does the environment have value for its own sake? cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.4: Discuss the view that the environment can have its own intrinsic value. How do you put value on: cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.4: Discuss the view that the environment can have its own intrinsic value. How do you put value on: cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.4: Discuss the view that the environment can have its own intrinsic value. How do you put value on: cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.4: Discuss the view that the environment can have its own intrinsic value. How do you put value on: cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.5: Explain the concept of sustainability in terms of natural capital and natural income. Two different cattle production methods Comparing cattle systems Himba nomadic cattle grazing Intensive beef production Both can be sustainable Nomadic grazing if long- term harvest (or moving from place to place so land has chance to recover pollution) rates do not Cattle survive on exceed rates of capital low grade natural forage with no supplements renewal During drought cattle die as grass disappears adding patches of nutrients to cebitz. the soil n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.5: Explain the concept of sustainability in terms of natural capital and natural income. Two different cattle production methods However if a system supports itself in part by depleting essential forms of natural capital it is unsustainable cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.6: Discuss the concept of sustainable development. What is sustainable development? Sustainable development has been defined as: “development that meets current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”Our Common Future (The Brundtland Report) 1987 cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.6: Discuss the concept of sustainable development. What is sustainable development is not Since the end of the Soviet era oil production on and around the Caspian sea in Azerbaijan has soared. While this has generated great wealth for some Azerbaijani’s and huge profits for many Western Oil Companies it has led to an ecological disaster in ecosystems of the Caspian cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.6: Discuss the concept of sustainable development. What is sustainable development is not Russia Azerbiajan Caspian sea Iran cebitz. n coScie m
  • 3.2: Resources - natural capital 3.2.6: Discuss the concept of sustainable development. What is sustainable development is not Oil production on the shores of the Caspian sea cebitz. n coScie m