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Gov20a Keynote

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Dinner keynote at Gov 2.0a Conference in Oklahoma City, OK - May 6, 2011

Dinner keynote at Gov 2.0a Conference in Oklahoma City, OK - May 6, 2011

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  • 1. Gov 2.0a = action, applied, around the countryHillary HartleyDirector of Integrated MarketingNIC Inc.
  • 2. VT ME MT 25 states ID 33% of US population IA RI NE UT CO $12.1 billion securely processed IN WV VA KS KY OK 120 million transactions TN AZ AR NM SC MS AL 7,500 applications 3,000 federal/state/local agencies TX HIDoing business in 25 states50% of states, 33% of population served$12.1 billion securely processed120 million transactions7,500 applications3,000 federal/state/local agencies100 million people served
  • 3. Spotlight on Oklahoma• OK.gov = 10 years• Transaction volumes have increased ~15% year over year• Green and efficient — http://ok.gov/gogreen/ that’s over 44,479,204 sheets of paper saved since January 2007 5,000 trees!• QuickTax application will save ~$400,000 in one tax season ($0.40 x 1 million transactions)• Partner is a pioneer — Gov 2.0 legislation, Data.OK.gov
  • 4. quick tour of state initiatives• “web 2.0”• mobile• mapping• social media• data• and then... a challenge
  • 5. prominent searchuser-friendlyaccessible back to basics design
  • 6. Prominent “Smart” Searchprominent, smart search functionality – try to predict what usersneednavigation that gets you straight to the content you need
  • 7. if you build it...? widgetseven though we put tremendous energy into designing our sites,we also know that just because you build it, doesn’t mean theywill come. widgets are still a popular and successful way ofsyndicating all types of content all over the web.
  • 8. everything changed mobilecontent is the platformdelivery is key - media queries, cssapps, apps, apps
  • 9. nearly 40 iPhone, iPad, Android, and Windows Mobile 7 apps -- over a milliondownloads. you can find ARRA projects based on your current location. you canget directions to department offices. look up your dentist’s professional license.or tag the buck you just shot.That said...
  • 10. I’ll be the first to tell you that before you go down the path of building an app, make your websitemobile-friendly.- Media queries to deliver the right type and size of content to the right device.- Utah is building a universal framework that provides automatic mobile and tablet versions, as well asintegrated social plugins like Twitter and Facebook for every site or application.- Not just content, but strategic mobile online service delivery based on what people are actually tryingto access on their phones.Mobile access in some states is growing almost 25% per month. Moreover, Morgan Stanley predictsmobile use will overtake desktop Internet use in 2014.
  • 11. And we are experimenting with QR codes to send people directlyto mobile-enabled services. This is a business card for theNebraska Electrical Division.
  • 12. beyond the mashup service delivery surfacing unknown content instant personalization mapping + geolocationgoing beyond the map mashup. mapping offers instantpersonalizationkey to delivering the “bottom 10 percent” of your contentlocalization helps surface content the user otherwise wouldn’tknow exists
  • 13. geolocation = personalized content delivery
  • 14. social media • be consistent • make it easy • mission before tools • platforms / APIs
  • 15. facebook - platform, master stream, embedding other tech
  • 16. twitter - aggregation like govtwit or listorious
  • 17. Crowdsourced galleries + geolocation.At RI.gov, a ʻmashupʼ of their photo group with a Google Map, showing exactly where our photoswere taken.
  • 18. IOWA Governor Terry Branstad - Ask the Governor#AskIAGov
  • 19. aggregationavailable for downloadpioneers like Data.OK.gov the new “Intel Inside” data
  • 20. miles to go before we sleep• most data portals are fairly haphazard• very limited data sets available• need aggressive targeting of high-value data sets• need feedback loops built-in to request and correct data• platforms like Socrata help ease the pain of consolidation• microformats = easy way to include scrapeable, open data in your HTML
  • 21. live help user research crowdsourced innovation we are listening customer serviceMy favorite slogan to come out of the early web 2.0 days is, “customer service is the new marketing.”When you engage your customers, your constituents...when you really listen to them, you are increasingtheir happiness. It’s a fuzzy metric, but it absolutely leads to an increase in adoption through returnvisits and social sharing.
  • 22. many tools, one job • live help online 24/7 • feedback forums • Q&A platforms • constituent engagement
  • 23. the challenge
  • 24. June Cohen TED MediaThis is June Cohen, the Executive Producer of TED Media. If youve never seen a TED talk, you can probably turn to your left or rightand ask your neighbor for their favorite. A few that come to mind immediately — Bobby McFerrin leading the audience in spontaneoussong, Sir Ken Robinson on the future of education, brain researcher Jill Bolte Taylor studying her own stroke as it happened, or BillGates releasing a swarm of mosquitos into the audience while he talked about the fight against malaria. But I digress...
  • 25. Back in 2006, after over 20 years as an inordinately expensive, invite-only event, TED began putting talks from their conferencesonline...for free. Ms. Cohen calls it a "strategy of radical openness."Over the last five years, TED has evolved from a 1,000-person conference to something much larger ... TED Talks have been viewedmore than 400 million times worldwide (thats more than twice the number of Americans who voted in the 2008 presidential election).They are available in 80 languages, thanks to all-volunteer army of translators. And over the last two years, more than 1,000independently organized "TEDx" events have been held worldwide, in 100 countries and 50 languages.
  • 26. TEDx is a local, community-driven conference where anyone can apply to present. Releasing control of theirbrand, their format, and their idea, the now wildly popular TED Talks format has essentially become a platform thatanyone anywhere can replicate.
  • 27. August 27, 2011 http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/2224FYI - I couldn’t find much information just yet, but it appears there is a TEDx coming to OKC.
  • 28. continuing with the theme of radical openness are TED Conversations (a Quora-like question and answer socialsite) and the TED API (expected later this year). TED Conversations aims to extend the conference experience tothe Web, enabling the sharing and discussion of topics beyond the video comment threads. The open accessprovided by the TED API will enable developers to build tools and applications around any TED and TEDx contentand associated data – topic, location, speaker, tags, etc.
  • 29. Ideas worth spreading.TEDs tagline, nee their mission, is "Ideas worth spreading." Ms. Cohen emphasizes that their foray onto the Web,then YouTube, TEDx, TED Conversations, and now the TED API is not merely about maximizing the social Webbut simply about finding the best ways to continue spreading ideas.But what does all of this have to do with government?
  • 30. Be a Platform Radical OpennessIf you havent sensed the theme yet, Ill repeat the mantra that youve likely read any time you google “gov 2.0”:government can be a platform.
  • 31. "Every time weve allowed people to contribute, people have surprised and humbled and delighted us." — June Cohen, TED MediaIf government agencies choose a path of radical openness, the possibilities are endless. What are platforms builtupon? Data. Content. People. What do governments have access to in abundance? Data. Content.People. Openness equates to access, participation, and as a result, a more connected and collaborative world.
  • 32. Ideas worth spreading. Government should be transparent, participatory, and collaborative. – Memorandum from President Barack ObamaSo, in conclusion I challenge you to find your tagline, your "Ideas worth spreading." What is the most basic missionof your agency? What is the kernel that drives anything worth getting done? Once you find that, the technologypart is easy.
  • 33. The technology is the easy part.Hillary Hartleyhillary@egov.comtwitter.com/hillarytwitter.com/gov20