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An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government
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An Integrated Approach - Measuring Social Media for Government

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Session for How to Measure Social Media in Government, May 1, 2013 …

Session for How to Measure Social Media in Government, May 1, 2013
http://www.aliconferences.com/conf/measure_social_media_gov0413/index.htm

With social media use on the rise in government, communication efforts require an integrated approach. Supporting marketing efforts with social media messages is a big part of this integration.

Texas.gov, one of the 29 state portals under the NICUSA umbrella, has successfully used this strategy in its efforts to increase awareness and online adoption of the driver services offered on its website. Creating and following a plan that integrates social media and measuring the results of those efforts has helped to bolster the success of an advertising campaign aimed at increasing driver license and vehicle registration renewals.

In this presentation, you will hear how Texas.gov:
- Incorporated social media into their communication efforts
- Determined what to measure to receive the most accurate ROI
- Measured the effectiveness of their social media efforts

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  • We’re doing business in 33 states -- running 29 state portals, including 2 of the 10 most populous states -- Texas & Pennsylvania.
    The transaction numbers are double what they were just two years ago. Adoption of online services continues to rise year after year.
  • Be specific.
  • PolicyTool is a 12-question wizard that spits out an internal social media policy for your employees. In a word, it’s awesome.
    Click— In case you can’t read that URL, it’s...
  • My two cents: develop more strategy than policy. A twenty-page policy doc will be outdated by the time it's completed and approved.  Instead, create "Terms of Participation" and focus on specific unwanted behavior.  

    Bottom line: policy is no longer sidelined and there are many great examples to follow. The last link is an online database of social media policies.
  • The New York Senate’s Terms of Participation document is basically five paragraphs.
    1. we encourage you to participate and contribute
    2. all posts are subject to limited monitoring
    3. this is what’s inappropriate
    4. this is what will happen to inappropriate content
    5. acknowledgement that by participating you agree to these terms
  • There are many topics to choose from when composing a tweet. For example, you can use twitter as a way to promote your services (as you can see here, the Travis County Tax Assessor regularly tweets when the vehicle registration renewal deadline is approaching. You can also inform the public of local news or emergency updates by posting links to the full story, or even to address customers most frequently asked questions.You can also tweet about special events, your agency’s press releases, relevant news stories, and awards or recognition that your agency may have received.
  • Listening is a catalyst. It can feed your efforts.
  • Listening can help attract followers and stimulate conversation. Helps diffuse frustrations by being able to identify the issue and respond.
  • Notice “competition” in quotes. You probably don’t have competition in the corporate sense of the word, but in this realm the rest of government is your competition. Use social media to see how your initiatives, websites, or online services are stacking up.
  • Demographics, popular topics, keywords, events, other agencies/organizations
    Listen and analyze before jumping in with new content.
  • You can google around for calculations and equations that might turn all of those measurements into a usable ROI dollar amount. But I think for most government organizations, a better use of time is to take all those measurements and consider it your “Return on Engagement.”
  • The important x-factor when looking at all these numbers is sentiment. The “ugh”s versus the “awesome”s.
  • The important x-factor when looking at all these numbers is sentiment. The “ugh”s versus the “awesome”s.
  • With the ultimate goals of increasing transactions and building brand awareness, Texas.gov uses an integrated approach in its marketing efforts. What does that mean? For every strategic goal we’ve set, we try to tap into all of our marketing channels to ensure success. An example of that is our advertising campaign which we use primarily to increase driver-related transactions. Social media is a big part of that integrated approach.

    We use an editorial Calendar to keep us on track and help us in our efforts to be more social

    We’re still learning about when to use which platform and how to best utilize each platform
    Twitter – Quick short way to broadcast a message widely
    Facebook – Can go a little more in depth, but still have to keep it short and sweet
    LinkedIn – Our platform for reaching out to current and potential partners
    YouTube – Increasingly popular; use for a variety of purposes – demos, webinars, ad campaign commercials
    Pinterest – Fun way to connect with citizens

    To talk about ROI or ROE , I’ll use our advertising campaign as an example.

    Our ad campaign focused on driver services (primarily our top two revenue producers – DLR & VRR)
    Consists of interactive banner ads and video commercials aired on TV and Hulu
    Equally important is our supplemental promotion:
    Driver landing page (having a centralized page helps us funnel traffic and enable us to measure traffic from ads)
    Press releases
    Additional driver services are promoted
    Links are tagged with GA (if they are one of our applications) or Bitly (if we don’t host the application) to measure
    Include a “Tweet This” call to action
    Social media
    Press release messaging
    Promote applications themselves
    Videos added to YouTube channel
    Measuring success
    Press releases – Links are tagged using GA (if we host the application) or Bitly (if we don’t host the application). We can measure:
    Clicks on the links
    Conversions (for hosted applications)
    Social media messages – tagged links
    Clicks on the links
    Conversions
    Videos
    Views
  • Equally important is our supplemental promotion:
    Driver landing page (having a centralized page helps us funnel traffic and enable us to measure traffic from ads)
    Links to demo videos on our YouTube channel
  • We use SM platforms to promote our advertising campaign, i.e. driver services
    Press release distribution via SM – General tweet about press release; tweet directly to bloggers and post about it on FB and LI
    Media pitch – include “Tweet This” call to action
    Upload the commercials to our YouTube channel
  • We promote services other than our driver-related ones
    We try to humanize our sm messaging by adding photos and by including some fun, non-application related messages
    Listen to SM conversation
    Respond to opportunities to promote
    Examples of the dialogue we’ve had with followers
  • Editorial calendar
    GovLoop’s Social Media Guide
  • HootSuite | Facebook Insights
    Google Analytics | YouTube Analytics
    Flickr Stats
  • 2012 metrics
  • 2012 metrics
  • Transcript

    • 1. ROI of Social Media An Integrated Approach Hillary Hartley Director of Integrated Marketing NIC Inc. | egov.com @hillary hillary@egov.com
    • 2. ROI of Social Media www.egov.com
    • 3. ROI of Social Media 29 states + 2 federal agencies 2 of the 10 most populous states $22.5 billion securely processed 200 million transactions 7,500 applications 3,500 federal/state/local agencies
    • 4. ROI of Social Media Social Media ROI Getting returns from well-crafted messaging and marketing.
    • 5. ROI of Social Media Getting Started? Have a Plan. • Set Goals. • Craft Clear Policies. • Engage > Listen > Monitor. • Measure.
    • 6. ROI of Social Media Social Media Plan 10 Questions Ten questions to get you well on your way. Goals. Strategy. Tactics. Usage.
    • 7. ROI of Social Media Goals 1. What do you hope to achieve? 2. Do your goals make sense within your overall organizational goals?
    • 8. ROI of Social Media Strategy 3. How will social media complement your organizational strategy? 4. What types of content will you provide? 5. What types of content will you solicit from your community?
    • 9. ROI of Social Media Tactics 6. What are the steps you’ll take to execute the strategy you just outlined? 7. Who will be responsible for executing the various parts of the strategy?
    • 10. ROI of Social Media Usage 8. What tools will you use? 9. How will you develop the content? 10. How often will you update?
    • 11. ROI of Social Media Pro Tip: Set Achievable Goals • Promote services • Engage with constituents • Provide customer service/support • Achieve transparency • Inform and be a news source • Embrace creativity
    • 12. ROI of Social Media Pro Tip: What’s Your Mission? • Don’t conflate strategy with tactics. • A tool is not a strategy. • Mission before tools!
    • 13. ROI of Social Media Policy & Guidelines
    • 14. ROI of Social Media Provide Clear Rules • What’s in bounds? • What’s out of bounds? • Who to escalate things to? • Overall strategy INTERNALLY — develop a document that tells employees: www.texas.gov/en/about/Pages/social-media-policy.aspx
    • 15. ROI of Social Media Provide Clear Rules • Be transparent • Be accurate • Be considerate • Be generous • Use disclaimers • Respect copyright • Reveal confidential information • Violate privacy • Breach trademarks DO DON’T
    • 16. ROI of Social Media http://socialmedia.policytool.net
    • 17. ROI of Social Media Provide Clear Rules • Comment Policy • Terms of Participation • External Links/Third Party EXTERNALLY — tell users what to expect and how to act.
    • 18. ROI of Social Media Follow the Leaders • facebook.com/USArmy/info • facebook.com/CDC • www.whitehouse.gov/ofqtos • www.nysenate.gov/legal • newmedia.hhs.gov/standards/comment_policy.html • www.epa.gov/irmpoli8/policies • socialmediagovernance.com/policies.php?f=5
    • 19. ROI of Social Media K.I.S.S. 1. encourage participation 2. declare limited monitoring 3. define what is inappropriate 4. what happens to inappropriate content 5. acknowledgement
    • 20. ROI of Social Media Engagement Where to start? Get to know your audience. Give them what they want.
    • 21. ROI of Social Media What to Tweet? • New or existing services • Important/timely news or emergency updates • Customer service or helpful info
    • 22. ROI of Social Media What to post? • Services you offer • Helpful info • Special events • Photos + videos do well on Facebook. • News + local updates get shared.
    • 23. ROI of Social Media People love videos! • Get creative! • Demonstrate services. • Talk to constituents. • Cross-post to other platforms to reach a wider audience.
    • 24. ROI of Social Media What to upload? • Community events • Service demos • PSAs • Testimonials • Commercials
    • 25. ROI of Social Media The first rule of Social Media Club?
    • 26. ROI of Social Media
    • 27. ROI of Social Media Monitoring / Listening Tracking what kind of content resonates. Trend-spotting.
    • 28. ROI of Social Media Why listen? • Gain a deeper perspective • Find new insights • Get new ideas • Justify projects • Inspire your teams • Better understand trends • Keep track of your “competition”
    • 29. ROI of Social Media Know where to listen. Twitter Search Alerts Trends $ $
    • 30. ROI of Social Media Pro Tip – Saved Searches • Twitter allows you to save searches • They carry over to desktop and mobile tools • Quick way to monitor keywords or follow an event
    • 31. ROI of Social Media “The hardest part of monitoring is figuring out what to search for...that usually takes a little trial and error finding the best searches.” Bob Spieldenner, Public Affairs Director with the Virginia Department of Emergency Management
    • 32. ROI of Social Media Who should be listening? • interns • support staff • PIOs Define the team, divide duties, and give everyone the tools.
    • 33. ROI of Social Media Know how to listen. • Agency or department name • Relevant URLs, keywords, & #hashtags • Campaigns, initiatives, events • Public figures, leaders, or key stakeholders • Critical issues • Nicknames, abbreviations, or misspellings of any of the above Develop a stack of keywords and saved searches that include:
    • 34. ROI of Social Media Measuring
    • 35. ROI of Social Media Measuring Social Media Activity • Exposure How many people are you reaching? • Engagement How many people are you engaging? • Influence Is your content influencing the conversation?
    • 36. ROI of Social Media Measuring Exposure • Track growth of followers as percent of total followers • Compare month to month Tactics:
    • 37. ROI of Social Media Measuring Engagement Track the number of people that click on links, the number of messages retweeted, or hashtags used. Track the number of “likes,” the number of comments and wall posts. Track the number of comments on a video, the number of times it was rated, and the number of new subscribers to your channel. Tactics:
    • 38. ROI of Social Media Measuring Influence • Track the “sentiment” of comments, mentions, shares — “ugh” vs. “awesome” • Rate each engagement as positive, negative, or neutral in tone. Assess. • Watch influential community members and see if they are engaging in or reposting your information. Tactics:
    • 39. ROI of Social Media Tools of the Trade • TweetReach • Google Analytics • Facebook Insights • Radian6 $$$ • Sysomos $$ • Scout Labs $
    • 40. ROI of Social Media Social Media ROI?
    • 41. ROI of Social Media Return on Engagement Time and investment spent participating or interacting with social communities, and in turn, what transpired that’s worthy of measurement. http://socialmediatoday.com/index.php?q=SMC/176801
    • 42. ROI of Social Media Quality > Quantity • Status measurements alone (Fans, Followers, etc.) don’t tell the right story • The Case of 4,000 Twitter Followers Who Don’t Care
    • 43. ROI of Social Media A Framework for Measuring Social Media • Attention. The amount of traffic to your content for a given period of time. Similar to the standard web metrics of site visits and page/video views. • Participation. The extent to which users engage with your content in a channel. Think blog comments, Facebook wall posts, YouTube ratings, or Twitter mentions. • Authority. The inbound links to your content – what users are linking to a blog post, video, or other URLs. • Influence. The size of the user base subscribed to your content. For blogs, feed or email subscribers; followers on Twitter; or fans of your Facebook page. http://j.mp/measuring-framework
    • 44. ROI of Social Media A Framework for Measuring Social Media • Attention. The amount of traffic to your content for a given period of time. Similar to the standard web metrics of site visits and page/video views. • Participation. The extent to which users engage with your content in a channel. Think blog comments, Facebook wall posts, YouTube ratings, or Twitter mentions. • Authority. The inbound links to your content – what users are linking to a blog post, video, or other URLs. • Influence. The size of the user base subscribed to your content. For blogs, feed or email subscribers; followers on Twitter; or fans of your Facebook page. http://j.mp/measuring-framework
    • 45. ROI of Social Media Texas.gov/Driver
    • 46. ROI of Social Media Texas.gov Key Components • Integrated approach Ad campaign  Texas.gov/Driver  Press release  Social media • Be more social • Editorial calendar • Leverage each platform appropriately • Measure results
    • 47. ROI of Social Media Integrated Approach 2300visits/day Up >1k visits/day vs 2011 Texas.gov/Driver landing page Average conversion rate in 2013 is 60+% 2012 – 35% 2011 – 14% Link to demo videos on YouTube
    • 48. ROI of Social Media Social media • Press release distribution • Media pitch call-to-action • Commercials on YouTube Integrated Approach
    • 49. ROI of Social Media Ongoing application promotion Listen & respond Have fun Be Social
    • 50. ROI of Social Media Provides direction Application seasonality Other considerations Editorial Calendar
    • 51. ROI of Social Media Measure Results Exposure • Interaction with Texas.gov • Increase in followers • “ShareIt” Action • Clicks and conversions
    • 52. ROI of Social Media 1818clicks (Facebook/Twitter) 13transactions 187click-throughs to Texas.gov apps 284original posts 60 Share-Its 5172followers up 40% over 2011 Measure Results
    • 53. ROI of Social Media Measure Results Texas.gov/Driver Link Clicks Transactions Conversion Rate Driver License Renewal (Quick Links) 52,031 20,381 39% Driver License / ID Card Renewal 90,010 30,018 33% Driver License Address Change 18,087 6,025 33% Driver Records 97,511 18,956 19% Driver License Reinstatement & Status 186,573 5,149 3% Vehicle Registration Renewal 21,097 Not available N/A Referrals from /Driver = 80,529 transactions Average conversion rate for target services is 35%... up from 14% in 2011  Texas.gov Conversions: Jan-Dec 2012
    • 54. ROI of Social Media Here to help! Hillary Hartley hillary@egov.com 415-573-2487 @hillary

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