Opening Science: Building bridges between research and society

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Opening Science: Building bridges between research and society

  1. 1. Opening ScienceBuilding bridges between research and society Why science communication?, 18 Feb 2013, C4DUdG, Universitat de Girona Miquel Duran, UdG @miquelduran miquel.duran@udg.edu http://miquelduran.net License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA
  2. 2. Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  3. 3. What does science communication in today’s world mean? Above all: be active and have an attitude towards sharing, collaborating and curating And please don’t forget to provide yourself with basic Digital skills – and ask if necessary
  4. 4. Course goals Responsible Research and Innovation• -­­ Promote the need to perform science dissemination to engage publics in the scientific agenda.• -­­ Showing public engagement models which promote feedback between experts and non-­­ experts.• -­­ Offering the possibility of creating professional networks, supported by face to face sessions, joint projects and knowledge exchange.• -­­ Providing tools: low-­­cost communication techniques, sources of funding, science communication plans, assessment methods, academic research in science communication...• -­­ Advising on the implementation of a practical exercise in science engagement, offering participants oversight as part of the training.• For, with, and by Society
  5. 5. Little Science Communicator Red Riding Hood• The constant change due to heavy use of IT in research leads sometimes to forget that important things (reflexion) must be prioritized wrt urgent things (hurry).• Granma Society waits for LRRH to bring her the Knowledge Basket, but Wolf Twodotzero tricks her so, instead of tanking the Reflection lane, takes the Hurry trail..
  6. 6. La Llei de la Ciència a Espanya, 2011• Preàmbul: “… reconoce las actividades de divulgación y de cultura científica y tecnológica como consustanciales a la carrera investigadora, para mejorar la comprensión y la percepción social sobre cuestiones científicas y tecnológicas y la sensibilidad hacia la innovación, así como para promover una mayor participación ciudadana en este ámbito”• Objecitus: “Fomentar la cooperación al desarrollo en materia de investigación científica, desarrollo tecnológico e innovación, orientada al progreso social y productivo, bajo el principio de la responsabilidad social de las instituciones de investigación e innovación”• Objectius – “Impulsar la cultura científica, tecnológica e innovadora a través de la educación, la formación y la divulgación en todos los sectores y en el conjunto de la sociedad”• Objectius: “Promover la participación activa de los ciudadanos en materia de investigación, desarrollo e innovación, y el reconocimiento social de la ciencia a través de la formación científica de la sociedad y de la divulgación científica y tecnológica, así como el reconocimiento de la actividad innovadora y empresarial.”
  7. 7. La Llei de la Ciència a Espanya, 2011• Artículo 38. Cultura científica y tecnológica.• 1. Las Administraciones Públicas fomentarán las actividades conducentes a la mejora de la cultura científica y tecnológica de la sociedad a través de la educación, la formación y la divulgación, y reconocerán adecuadamente las actividades de los agentes del Sistema Español de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación en este ámbito.• 2. En los Planes Estatales de Investigación Científica y Técnica y de Innovación se incluirán medidas para la consecución de los siguientes objetivos:• a) Mejorar la formación científica e innovadora de la sociedad, al objeto de que todas las personas puedan en todo momento tener criterio propio sobre las modificaciones que tienen lugar en su entorno natural y tecnológico
  8. 8. La Llei de la Ciència a Espanya, 2011• b) Fomentar la divulgación científica, tecnológica e innovadora.• c) Apoyar a las instituciones involucradas en el desarrollo de la cultura científica y• tecnológica, mediante el fomento e incentivación de la actividad de museos, planetarios y centros divulgativos de la ciencia.• d) Fomentar la comunicación científica e innovadora por parte de los agentes de ejecución del Sistema Español de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación.• e) Proteger el patrimonio científico y tecnológico histórico.• f) Incluir la cultura científica, tecnológica y de innovación como eje transversal en todo el sistema educativo.
  9. 9. How we (scientists) can communicate (1/3)• By origin – Personal – Groupal – Corporate• By destination – Indexed Journals / Scholar Publications – Science journals for scientists (eg Scientific American) – Science General for the Public (eg Quo, La Recherche) – Communicacion of Science Culture – Citizens Outreach – Childrens, Youth Outreach
  10. 10. How we (scientists) can communicate (2/3)• By medium – Paper – Multimedia/Radio & TV/Cinema – Internet – Webs – Blogs – Twitter – Other Social Media – Augmented Reality – Video streaming
  11. 11. How we (scientists) can communicate (3/3)• Personal – Shows – Theater – Performances• By direction – Unidirectional – Bidirectional – Multidireccional• By privacy level – Private – Semiprivate – Public• By message – Own personal: PhD / researcher blog – News curation on a particular field of science – News curation on policy, funding, etc. – Contributing to shared blog – Contributing to research group• Others
  12. 12. Purpose• Why, where, when?• Purpose – Branding – Marketing – Social Service – Cooperation & Volunteering – Building online presence• Some challenges – Language – Digital divides• Source of funding!
  13. 13. Spiros Kitsinelis: why communicate science? The art of science communication• To attract more students in the science departments of the university• To create a knowledge based economy and render countries more competitive in today’s world• To get public support for more government research funding• To create a more technology literate workforce for the private sector tht wants to innovate.• Because the public needs to be informed and involved• People will only be liberated from false ideas, prejudices etc. only if they have scientific knowledge on their side.• Distinction between interesting and attractive events.
  14. 14. Little Science Communicator Red Riding Hood• Dazzled Little Social Science Communicator Red Riding Hood is a part of a collection of people that see IT and Web 2.0 as a new form of magic.• However, like magicians actually just create illusions, Society must know how to take profit from Web 2.0 cleverly, namely the University and the other sectors of Society.• Digital divide (and perhaps scientific divide) does not shorten, but widens. We cannot stand it.• The wolf (will) eat(s) LRRH
  15. 15. Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  16. 16. This is me and my digital circumstances• And what I eat, what I read, what play with… – Archive – Social networks – Websites – Blog – Photos – Videos – Mobile devices – Computers, tablets, cell phones, etc. – 3D printers!
  17. 17. Tweetaudience• This presentation is available somewhere in the cyberspace• Audience: – Note taking – Ideas – Reflections – Tweets!! • Following • “in situ” evaluation• This is me, my circumstances, my arcive, my web/blog, and my social networks (and further – I’m the place where I am right now)
  18. 18. From wikipedia to Wolfram Alpha• The experience of the Catalan Wikipedia• Wikimedia Commons• Wikiprojectes, Wikibooks, etc.• Viquiproject Science Week 2011 and 2012• http://alpha.wolfram.com• On can ask about everything!• Stephen Wolfram: a new kind of science
  19. 19. Some ideas• Everyone should hava a fast and quality access to Internet• Everyone should have a mobilde devide (smartphone, tablet)• Everyone should be able to obtaing formation i basic digital skills• Safe social networks, e-mail, etc… should be a Citizen Right• Twitter: should be make a Public Affair: it will become history, it will enter history
  20. 20. Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  21. 21. Pushing forward Open Science• SpotOn London 2012 – http://www.nature.com/spoton• UKWebFocus blog – http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com
  22. 22. Alternative to 20st century publishing?• Open source software, open source beer… open publishing!• Open access (mandatory for EU in 2014)• Open data (… big data)• Just 3 examples from SpotOn Science HackDay – Figshare.com – Researchfish.com – http://www.frontiersin.org (open publishing)
  23. 23. Panton Principles: Principles for Open Data in Science.• http://pantonprinciples.org/• Science is based on building on, reusing and openly criticising the published body of scientific knowledge.• For science to effectively function, and for society to reap the full benefits from scientific endeavours, it is crucial that science data be made open.
  24. 24. Example of Open Science• http://science.okfn.org• Open data• Open access• Open research• Open Science Foundation
  25. 25. Creative Commons License• Creative Commons – Attributes – ND – NC – SA – BY• http://creativecommons.org (see video inside)
  26. 26. Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  27. 27. And now researchers’ frontier: Outreach• The guardian: Going viral: Using social media to publicise academic research• http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education- network/blog/2011/apr/11/communications-marketing-management- admin-and-services
  28. 28. Outreach: compulsory?• Outreach is more and more relevant• It’s a duty of (senior) researchers• It’s interesting (and perhaps fun) for junior researchers and PhD students• Pushed by governments… but no much money• Loved by people out there• Universities, learned societies, associations, museums, … a network of disseminators• Social communication of research, science,knowledge• Leads to a well-informed society• Provides publications beyond scholarly papers - +cv
  29. 29. How we (scientists) can communicate• By origin – Personal – Groupal – Corporate• By destination – Indexed Journals / Scholar Publications – Science journals for scientists (eg Scientific American) – Science General for the Public (eg Quo, La Recherche) – Communicacion of Science Culture – Citizens Outreach – Childrens, Youth Outreach
  30. 30. How we (scientists) can communicate• Personal – Shows – Theater – Performances• By message – Own personal: PhD / researcher blog – News curation on a particular field of science – News curation on policy, funding, etc. – Contributing to shared blog – Contributing to research group
  31. 31. Algunes reflexions rellevants• Informe FECyT de percepció social de la ciència• Articles de The Guardian• Estudis Fundación BBVA• SpotOn London• Informe Enciende COSCE
  32. 32. Informe FECyT de Percepció Social de la Ciència:més rellevància de la Comunicació Científica 2.0• http://www.fecyt.es/fecyt/docs/tmp/363174605.pdf• No hi ha gaire canvis espectaculars respecte de la darrera edició, però al menys cal remarcar-hi dues coses: en primer lloc, els metges i els científics continuen essent els col.lectius més valorats entre els gairebé 8.000 entrevistats. I en segon lloc, l’informe mostra que cada cop més els ciutadans s’informen de ciència via internet i sobretot les xarxes socials, és a dir, que la comunicació 2.0 de la ciència és cada cop més rellevant.• També és interessant el resultat que el 25% dels enquestats no està interessant en la ciència i tecnologia perquè, senzillament, no l’entèn.
  33. 33. La ciència ha de ser divertida perquè la societat sigui científicament culta• http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/nov/04/geeks- comedians-academics-fun-science• Geeks, comedians and academics are putting the fun back into science és el títol d’un post de The Guardian subtitulat “Science used to be the opposite of entertaining, but now sell-out tours featuring gags, songs and mini-lectures are a hit across the country”.• En aquesta entrada s’hi comenta com les arts escèniques fan servir la ciència per entretenir, però també com entretenen parlant de ciència. La darrera frase, però, és de política social científica:• “A few years ago, scientists would moan about an error they had seen on TV or when a minister made some incompetent statement about science. Nowadays, they act. The skeptics, and others who have found each other through the shows curated by Ince and the books and columns of Ben Goldacre, have become a social-media-enabled army of rationalists who has stepped up to fight a scourge of anti-vaxxers, homeopaths, politicians, companies and, frankly, anyone else who misuses evidence.”• No n’hi ha prou amb queixar-se quan els polítics s’equivoquen o els canals de televisió fan programes de pseudociència. Cal actuar. Els científics han de moure’s perquè tinguem una societat més científicament culta.
  34. 34. Dos estudis de la Fundació BBVA respecte de la percepció social de la ciència• “Ciencia: la fe del que no sabe” és un reportatge que va sortir fa poc a El País• http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/07/23/actualidad/13430 72538_559229.html• Parla d’un informe de la Fundación BBVA “Cultura científica: actitudes ante la ciencia” (de moment només n’hi ha la presentació en PPT)• http://www.fbbva.es/TLFU/tlfu/esp/investigacion/fichainves/index.j sp?codigo=381• Segons El País, es tracta de la segona part del que ja va comentar el mateix diari, “Estudio internacional de la cultura científica”• http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/05/08/actualidad/13365 02274_505761.html.• Res de especialment nou i rellevant, però és bo saber per on van els trets. Ja és ben conegut: metges, mestres i científics són els més ben valorats (… els metges no en són, de científics?)
  35. 35. Fent malabarisme amb la ciència i la seva comunicació• Anne Osterrieder a SpotOn London comenta la seva vivència personal, en fer comunicació de la ciència gairebé d’amagatotis durant un temps, fins arribar al moment actual en què pot combinar raonablement la seva recerca ebiomèdica amb la seva activitat comunicadora. En definitiva, que d’alguna forma fa una mica de malabarisme. SpotOn London 2012: My not-so-secret-anymore double life: Juggling research and science communication• http://www.nature.com/spoton/2012/11/spoton-london-2012-my-not-so-secret- anymore-double-life-juggling-research-and-science-communication• “Now I am a Research and Science Communication Fellow. This means that half of my time is spent pursuing my research on plant organelles and establishing an independent research programme. The other half I spend on science communication: organizing events and training workshops for staff and students, both internally and externally, and continuing with my own outreach projects.”• Aquesta investigadora fa una sèrie de recomanacions interessants: els explica bé - – Find allies. – Get organized. – Evaluate. – Grow a thick skin. – Be proud of your accomplishments.
  36. 36. Informe Enciende• COSCE (confederación sociedades científicas españolas)• http://www.cosce.org/pdf/Informe_ENCIENDE.pdf• Reflexiones y recomendaciones para una mejora de la educación científica en edades tempranas en España desde los sectores científico, social y de la enseñanza de las ciencias
  37. 37. Relevant article• More than a blog: Should science bloggers stick to popularizing science and fighting creationism, or does blogging have a wider role to play in the scientific discoursehan a blog:?• http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v12/n11/full/ embor2011201a.html?WT.ec_id=EMBOR-201111
  38. 38. The Guardian• How should researchers talk about science to the public?• http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education- network/blog/2012/feb/20/making-science-accessible
  39. 39. Public Engagementhttps://www.publicengagement.ac.uk
  40. 40. Engaging thru the Internet http://Science140.org (+ ciencia140 + catciencia140.net)
  41. 41. Humour is very important! Famelab http://famelab.org
  42. 42. Outreach possibilities• What? – Our work – Someone elses work – Sound knowledge – Citizen Science – Public awareness• On the spot – Demonstrative – Pedagogic/teaching Spectacular• Internet – Blogging/website – Science Blogs @ Newspapers Contests – Etc
  43. 43. Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  44. 44. Outreach in an actual group• Two communications buy the @c4dudg to International Science Communication meeting, Nancy - and INTED, València: – PPT "Is digital communication an actual, clever way to disseminate science?” – PPT "Imagine! - some trends in recreational science and the pursue of science careers”• See them in http://slideshare.net/quelgir
  45. 45. C4D UdGhttp://c4d.udg.edu
  46. 46. Let me bring my own case• Levels of action: – Coordinating UdG’s science dissemination – Involving in C4D’s activities – Personal activities• Types of action: – Communicating results of research (academic) – Talks (e.g. quasicrystalls) – Outreach (Researchers’ Night, Science Fairs) – Shows (e.g. Magic and Science)• Reason: because we need to increase Society’s Scientific Culture, and we must promote Science awareness.
  47. 47. And also have a look to …• Take a look at my blog Edunomia, category “comciencia” – http://edunomia.net• And also my mesoblog “Molecularity Report” – http://edunoming.wordpress.com• And even my curation space in Scoop.It “Impromptu topics” – http://www.scoop.it/u/quelet
  48. 48. Engaging thru recreational science http://Estalella20.net
  49. 49. Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  50. 50. RRI: How do we receive feedback?• Meetings with Research and Innovation stockholders at UdG’s Science and Technology Park (i.e., companies, private sector)• Meeting parents and families at outreach activities• By means of online activities• Bringing young students to the University, practical activities• Formal interaction with other Public Institutions, government officials, elected citzens• Above all: be active!
  51. 51. Some challenges and difficulties• RRI, Web 2.0, Social Networking, Communicating Research – is rather an attitude• There is a paramount task yet in involving and motivating (good) researchers, research groups and academic units in communicating (well!) Research and Science.• Dissemination of Research and Public Outreach is hindered by current issues.• There is a high pressure (Publish of Perish, Transfer or Die, etc.) that does not free time enough to get involved in Public Outreach and Dissemination activities• A proper system of Rewards could be established to catalyze and promote Science and Research communication.
  52. 52. OK. We’ve got the point – and now what?• Let’s movilize• Let’s change• Let’s move• Let’s do thinkgs well• Let’s concentrate• Let’s keep freedom• Let’s catalyze a positive attidude• Let’s (place here your favourite call to action)
  53. 53. El meu químic favorit…En Panoràmix, el druida
  54. 54. G. Iffrah, Histoire des Xiffres• Science is knowlege that becomes true by means of criticism (S. Bachelard)• Invention in theoretical science has the character of discovery, but it is a disconvery in the worlk of mind (L. de Broglie)• All science is just a depuration of daily thinking (A. Einstein)• (note: look for those people’s quotes!)Ciència i Futur de la Humanitat,28/1/2008
  55. 55. And now, three quotes...• Education is not a preparation for life, It is life itself• Your attitude is a choice• Education: there is a treasure insideThus:Communicating Science (and hence RRI) is anattitude. Everyone can communicate well ifprovided with relevant skills.
  56. 56. Ciència i Futur de la Humanitat,28/1/2008

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