20140121 ctm-comcient

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20140121 ctm-comcient

  1. 1. Comunicació social de la ciència Bastint ponts entre recerca i societat Programa CTM Dept Ensen 21 Gen 2014, Miquel Duran, UdG @miquelduran miquel.duran@udg.edu http://miquelduran.net License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA, with exceptions
  2. 2. Per què hem de comunicar?
  3. 3. Little Social Science Communicator Red Riding Hood
  4. 4. Obrint la ciència
  5. 5. Jo sóc jo i el meu CV
  6. 6. Making things interesting = relevant + attractive
  7. 7. There is no longer any difference between trivial and important things
  8. 8. Reputation, impact, objective
  9. 9. Beneficis
  10. 10. Una societat de coneixement obert
  11. 11. Investigació I Innovació Responsables
  12. 12. Impactar, col.laborar, compartir, cooperar?
  13. 13. Idees que paga la pena de difondre
  14. 14. Bones pràctiques
  15. 15. Alguns elements actuals
  16. 16. Rànkings universitaris
  17. 17. Researchgate: en Bill Gates hi inverteix? + MOOC Research Initiative
  18. 18. Un neologisme: MOOC
  19. 19. Nova habilitat bàsica: el video
  20. 20. Flow • • • • • • Why communicate? This is a digital world (too) An open knowledge society Outreach, public awareness, feekback Our particular case Final thoughts
  21. 21. What does science communication in today’s world mean? Above all: be active and have an attitude towards sharing, collaborating and curating And please don’t forget to provide yourself with basic Digital skills – and ask if necessary
  22. 22. Little Science Communicator Red Riding Hood • The constant change due to heavy use of IT in research leads sometimes to forget that important things (reflexion) must be prioritized wrt urgent things (hurry). • Granma Society waits for LRRH to bring her the Knowledge Basket, but Wolf Twodotzero tricks her so, instead of tanking the Reflection lane, takes the Hurry trail..
  23. 23. How we (scientists) can communicate (1/3) • By origin – Personal – Groupal – Corporate • By destination – – – – – – Indexed Journals / Scholar Publications Science journals for scientists (eg Scientific American) Science General for the Public (eg Quo, La Recherche) Communicacion of Science Culture Citizens Outreach Children's, Youth Outreach
  24. 24. How we (scientists) can communicate (2/3) • By medium – – – – – – – – – Paper Multimedia/Radio & TV/Cinema Internet Webs Blogs Twitter Other Social Media Augmented Reality Video streaming
  25. 25. How we (scientists) can communicate (3/3) • Personal – Shows – Theater – Performances • By direction – Unidirectional – Bidirectional – Multidireccional • By privacy level – Private – Semiprivate – Public • By message – – – – – Own personal: PhD / researcher blog News curation on a particular field of science News curation on policy, funding, etc. Contributing to shared blog Contributing to research group • Others
  26. 26. Purpose • Why, where, when? • Purpose – – – – – Branding Marketing Social Service Cooperation & Volunteering Building online presence • Some challenges – Language – Digital divides • Source of funding!
  27. 27. Spiros Kitsinelis: why communicate science? The art of science communication • To attract more students in the science departments of the university • To create a knowledge based economy and render countries more competitive in today’s world • To get public support for more government research funding • To create a more technology literate workforce for the private sector tht wants to innovate. • Because the public needs to be informed and involved • People will only be liberated from false ideas, prejudices etc. only if they have scientific knowledge on their side. • Distinction between interesting and attractive events.
  28. 28. Communicating Science (Kitsinelis, the-nightlab.com) • Making it intesting: on the difference between being interested and making it interesting (opening the door) – Interested because of scencetid culture increase, science awareness, well-informed citizenship • On the relevance of what is being communicated (rational) - serious • On making it attractive (emotional) – fun, games
  29. 29. Saragossa 2013: I jornades de Divulgació Innovadora http://www.divulgacioninnovadora.com
  30. 30. Little Science Communicator Red Riding Hood • Dazzled Little Social Science Communicator Red Riding Hood is a part of a collection of people that see IT and Web 2.0 as a new form of magic. • However, like magicians actually just create illusions, Society must know how to take profit from Web 2.0 cleverly, namely the University and the other sectors of Society. • Digital divide (and perhaps scientific divide) does not shorten, but widens. We cannot stand it. • The wolf (will) eat(s) LRRH
  31. 31. Flow • • • • • • Why communicate? This is a digital world (too) An open knowledge society Outreach, public awareness, feekback Our particular case Final thoughts
  32. 32. This is me and my digital circumstances • And what I eat, what I read, what play with… – – – – – – – – – Archive Social networks Websites Blog Photos Videos Mobile devices Computers, tablets, cell phones, etc. 3D printers!
  33. 33. Tweetaudience • This presentation is available somewhere in the cyberspace • Audience: – – – – Note taking Ideas Reflections Tweets!! • Following • “in situ” evaluation • This is me, my circumstances, my arcive, my web/blog, and my social networks (and further – I’m the place where I am right now)
  34. 34. From wikipedia to Wolfram Alpha • • • • The experience of the Catalan Wikipedia Wikimedia Commons Wikiprojectes, Wikibooks, etc. Viquiproject Science Week 2011 and 2012 • http://alpha.wolfram.com • On can ask about everything! • Stephen Wolfram: a new kind of science
  35. 35. Some ideas • Everyone should hava a fast and quality access to Internet • Everyone should have a mobilde devide (smartphone, tablet) • Everyone should be able to obtaing formation i basic digital skills • Safe social networks, e-mail, etc… should be a Citizen Right • Twitter: should be make a Public Affair: it will become history, it will enter history
  36. 36. Flow • • • • • • Why communicate? This is a digital world (too) An open knowledge society Outreach, public awareness, feekback Our particular case Final thoughts
  37. 37. Pushing forward Open Science • SpotOn London 2012 – http://www.nature.com/spoton • UKWebFocus blog – http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com
  38. 38. Alternative to 20st century publishing? • Open source software, open source beer… open publishing! • Open access (mandatory for EU in 2014) • Open data (… big data) • Just 3 examples from SpotOn Science HackDay – Figshare.com – Researchfish.com – http://www.frontiersin.org (open publishing)
  39. 39. Panton Principles: Principles for Open Data in Science. • http://pantonprinciples.org/ • Science is based on building on, reusing and openly criticising the published body of scientific knowledge. • For science to effectively function, and for society to reap the full benefits from scientific endeavours, it is crucial that science data be made open.
  40. 40. Example of Open Science • • • • http://science.okfn.org Open data Open access Open research • Open Science Foundation
  41. 41. Creative Commons License • Creative Commons – Attributes – ND – NC – SA – BY • http://creativecommons.org (see video inside)
  42. 42. Flow • • • • • • Why communicate? This is a digital world (too) An open knowledge society Outreach, public awareness, feekback Our particular case Final thoughts
  43. 43. And now researchers’ frontier: Outreach • The guardian: Going viral: Using social media to publicise academic research • http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-educationnetwork/blog/2011/apr/11/communications-marketing-managementadmin-and-services
  44. 44. Outreach: compulsory? • Outreach is more and more relevant • It’s a duty of (senior) researchers • It’s interesting (and perhaps fun) for junior researchers and PhD students • Pushed by governments… but no much money • Loved by people out there • Universities, learned societies, associations, museums, … a network of disseminators • Social communication of research, science,knowledge • Leads to a well-informed society • Provides publications beyond scholarly papers - +cv
  45. 45. How we (scientists) can communicate • By origin – Personal – Groupal – Corporate • By destination – – – – – – Indexed Journals / Scholar Publications Science journals for scientists (eg Scientific American) Science General for the Public (eg Quo, La Recherche) Communicacion of Science Culture Citizens Outreach Children's, Youth Outreach
  46. 46. How we (scientists) can communicate • Personal – Shows – Theater – Performances • By message – Own personal: PhD / researcher blog – News curation on a particular field of science – News curation on policy, funding, etc. – Contributing to shared blog – Contributing to research group
  47. 47. Algunes reflexions rellevants • Informe FECyT de percepció social de la ciència • Articles de The Guardian • Estudis Fundación BBVA • SpotOn London • Informe Enciende COSCE
  48. 48. Informe FECyT de Percepció Social de la Ciència: més rellevància de la Comunicació Científica 2.0 • http://www.fecyt.es/fecyt/docs/tmp/363174605.pdf • No hi ha gaire canvis espectaculars respecte de la darrera edició, però al menys cal remarcar-hi dues coses: en primer lloc, els metges i els científics continuen essent els col.lectius més valorats entre els gairebé 8.000 entrevistats. I en segon lloc, l’informe mostra que cada cop més els ciutadans s’informen de ciència via internet i sobretot les xarxes socials, és a dir, que la comunicació 2.0 de la ciència és cada cop més rellevant. • També és interessant el resultat que el 25% dels enquestats no està interessant en la ciència i tecnologia perquè, senzillament, no l’entèn.
  49. 49. La ciència ha de ser divertida perquè la societat sigui científicament culta • http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/nov/04/geekscomedians-academics-fun-science • Geeks, comedians and academics are putting the fun back into science és el títol d’un post de The Guardian subtitulat “Science used to be the opposite of entertaining, but now sell-out tours featuring gags, songs and mini-lectures are a hit across the country”. • En aquesta entrada s’hi comenta com les arts escèniques fan servir la ciència per entretenir, però també com entretenen parlant de ciència. La darrera frase, però, és de política social científica: • “A few years ago, scientists would moan about an error they had seen on TV or when a minister made some incompetent statement about science. Nowadays, they act. The skeptics, and others who have found each other through the shows curated by Ince and the books and columns of Ben Goldacre, have become a social-media-enabled army of rationalists who has stepped up to fight a scourge of anti-vaxxers, homeopaths, politicians, companies and, frankly, anyone else who misuses evidence.” • No n’hi ha prou amb queixar-se quan els polítics s’equivoquen o els canals de televisió fan programes de pseudociència. Cal actuar. Els científics han de moure’s perquè tinguem una societat més científicament culta.
  50. 50. Dos estudis de la Fundació BBVA respecte de la percepció social de la ciència • “Ciencia: la fe del que no sabe” és un reportatge que va sortir fa poc a El País • http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/07/23/actualidad/13430 72538_559229.html • Parla d’un informe de la Fundación BBVA “Cultura científica: actitudes ante la ciencia” (de moment només n’hi ha la presentació en PPT) • http://www.fbbva.es/TLFU/tlfu/esp/investigacion/fichainves/index.j sp?codigo=381 • Segons El País, es tracta de la segona part del que ja va comentar el mateix diari, “Estudio internacional de la cultura científica” • http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/05/08/actualidad/13365 02274_505761.html. • Res de especialment nou i rellevant, però és bo saber per on van els trets. Ja és ben conegut: metges, mestres i científics són els més ben valorats (… els metges no en són, de científics?)
  51. 51. Fent malabarisme amb la ciència i la seva comunicació • Anne Osterrieder a SpotOn London comenta la seva vivència personal, en fer comunicació de la ciència gairebé d’amagatotis durant un temps, fins arribar al moment actual en què pot combinar raonablement la seva recerca ebiomèdica amb la seva activitat comunicadora. En definitiva, que d’alguna forma fa una mica de malabarisme. SpotOn London 2012: My notso-secret-anymore double life: Juggling research and science communication • http://www.nature.com/spoton/2012/11/spoton-london-2012-my-not-sosecret-anymore-double-life-juggling-research-and-science-communication • “Now I am a Research and Science Communication Fellow. This means that half of my time is spent pursuing my research on plant organelles and establishing an independent research programme. The other half I spend on science communication: organizing events and training workshops for staff and students, both internally and externally, and continuing with my own outreach projects.” • Aquesta investigadora fa una sèrie de recomanacions interessants: els explica bé: Find allies, Get organized, Evaluate. Grow a thick skin, Be proud of your accomplishments.
  52. 52. Informe Enciende • COSCE (confederación sociedades científicas españolas) • http://www.cosce.org/pdf/Informe_ENCIENDE.pdf • Reflexiones y recomendaciones para una mejora de la educación científica en edades tempranas en España desde los sectores científico, social y de la enseñanza de las ciencias
  53. 53. Relevant article • More than a blog: Should science bloggers stick to popularizing science and fighting creationism, or does blogging have a wider role to play in the scientific discoursehan a blog:? • http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v12/n11/full/ embor2011201a.html?WT.ec_id=EMBOR-201111
  54. 54. The Guardian • How should researchers talk about science to the public? • http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-educationnetwork/blog/2012/feb/20/making-science-accessible
  55. 55. Public Engagement https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk
  56. 56. Engaging thru the Internet http://Science140.org (+ ciencia140 + catciencia140.net)
  57. 57. L’humor és molt important! Famelab http://famelab.org
  58. 58. De Famelab a The Big Van Theory
  59. 59. Outreach possibilities • What? • On the spot • Internet – Our work – Someone else's work – Sound knowledge – Citizen Science – Public awareness – Demonstrative – Pedagogic/teaching Spectacular – Blogging/website – Science Blogs @ Newspapers Contests – Etc
  60. 60. Two new skills • Of the varios skills involved in a digital world, besides being able to surf the Internet, wrtie a blog, take a picture … • One must be able to selfcast (i.e., produce short videoclips –like write short pieces) – new literac • Be able to survive the so-called gossip econsystems • And also structure presentations, mental mappng, cloud sharing, social networking, etc.
  61. 61. Flow • • • • • • Why communicate? This is a digital world (too) An open knowledge society Outreach, public awareness, feekback Our particular case Final thoughts
  62. 62. Let me bring my own case • Levels of action: – (So far) Coordinating UdG’s science dissemination – Involving in C4D’s activities – Personal activities • Types of action: – – – – – – – Communicating results of research (academic) Talks (e.g. quasicrystalls) Outreach (Researchers’ Night, Science Fairs) Shows (e.g. Magic and Science) Internet! Social media, blog Participating in may activities TEDx, MOOCs, Open Knowledge… • Reason: because we need to increase Society’s Scientific Culture, and we must promote Science awareness.
  63. 63. Flow • • • • • • Why communicate? This is a digital world (too) An open knowledge society Outreach, public awareness, feekback Our particular case Final thoughts
  64. 64. RRI: How do we receive feedback? • Meetings with Research and Innovation stockholders at UdG’s Science and Technology Park (i.e., companies, private sector) • Meeting parents and families at outreach activities • By means of online activities • Bringing young students to the University, practical activities • Formal interaction with other Public Institutions, government officials, elected citzens • Above all: be active!
  65. 65. Some challenges and difficulties • RRI, Web 2.0, Social Networking, Communicating Research – is rather an attitude • There is a paramount task yet in involving and motivating (good) researchers, research groups and academic units in communicating (well!) Research and Science. • Dissemination of Research and Public Outreach is hindered by current issues. • There is a high pressure (Publish of Perish, Transfer or Die, etc.) that does not free time enough to get involved in Public Outreach and Dissemination activities • A proper system of Rewards could be established to catalyze and promote Science and Research communication.
  66. 66. OK. We’ve got the point – and now what? • • • • • • • • Let’s movilize Let’s change Let’s move Let’s do thinkgs well Let’s concentrate Let’s keep freedom Let’s catalyze a positive attidude Let’s (place here your favourite call to action)
  67. 67. I per emportar-se’n…!
  68. 68. And now, three quotes... • Education is not a preparation for life, It is life itself • Your attitude is a choice • Education: there is a treasure inside Thus: Communicating Science (and hence RRI) is an attitude. Everyone can communicate well if provided with relevant skills.
  69. 69. Ciència i Futur de la Humanitat, 28/1/2008
  70. 70. I ara… un petit moment de relax • Explicant el concepte d’entrellaçament quàntic de partícules • Fent servir la Carta de Schrödinger
  71. 71. Schrödinger’s Cat experiment • Dead or alive? • Is card red or black?
  72. 72. Educando con magia, Xuxo Ruiz • https://www.facebook.com/EducandoConMagia
  73. 73. Any Martin Gardner • 100 anys del naixement de Martin Gardner • Explorant les matemàtiques, la ciència, la filosofia, la màgia, el joc • http://gathering4gardner.org
  74. 74. MOOC Màgia, ciència i secrets confessables Amb Fernado Blasco, UPM, autor del llibre “Matemagia” • 1.- Historia. Los científicos como “magos” • 2.- La ciencia de lo curioso • 3.- Magia con pocos secretos • 4.- La ciencia explica la magia • 5.- Magia para introducir ciencia • 6.- Magia matemática, física y química • 7.- Magia y comunicación • 8.- Magos, científicos y milagros Més info: http://magcimooc.net amb video viral I de presentació

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