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20130610 ubuviri-ciencia20-eng 20130610 ubuviri-ciencia20-eng Presentation Transcript

  • Opening ScienceBuilding bridges between research andsocietyWhy science communication?, 10+11/6/2013,C4DUdG, Universitat de GironaMiquel Duran, UdG@miquelduranmiquel.duran@udg.eduhttp://miquelduran.netLicense: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA
  • Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  • What does science communicationin today’s world mean?Above all: be active and have anattitude towards sharing, collaboratingand curatingAnd please don’t forget to provideyourself with basic Digital skills – andask if necessary
  • Little Science Communicator RedRiding Hood• The constant change due toheavy use of IT in researchleads sometimes to forgetthat important things(reflexion) must beprioritized wrt urgent things(hurry).• Granma Society waits forLRRH to bring her theKnowledge Basket, but WolfTwodotzero tricks her so,instead of tanking theReflection lane, takes theHurry trail..
  • How we (scientists) can communicate (1/3)• By origin– Personal– Groupal– Corporate• By destination– Indexed Journals / Scholar Publications– Science journals for scientists (eg Scientific American)– Science General for the Public (eg Quo, La Recherche)– Communicacion of Science Culture– Citizens Outreach– Childrens, Youth Outreach
  • • By medium– Paper– Multimedia/Radio & TV/Cinema– Internet– Webs– Blogs– Twitter– Other Social Media– Augmented Reality– Video streamingHow we (scientists) can communicate (2/3)
  • How we (scientists) can communicate (3/3)• Personal– Shows– Theater– Performances• By direction– Unidirectional– Bidirectional– Multidireccional• By privacy level– Private– Semiprivate– Public• By message– Own personal: PhD / researcher blog– News curation on a particular field of science– News curation on policy, funding, etc.– Contributing to shared blog– Contributing to research group• Others
  • Purpose• Why, where, when?• Purpose– Branding– Marketing– Social Service– Cooperation & Volunteering– Building online presence• Some challenges– Language– Digital divides• Source of funding!
  • Spiros Kitsinelis: why communicate science?The art of science communication• To attract more students in the science departments ofthe university• To create a knowledge based economy and rendercountries more competitive in today’s world• To get public support for more government researchfunding• To create a more technology literate workforce for theprivate sector tht wants to innovate.• Because the public needs to be informed and involved• People will only be liberated from false ideas, prejudicesetc. only if they have scientific knowledge on their side.• Distinction between interesting and attractive events.
  • Communicating Science (Kitsinelis)• Making it intesting: on the difference betweenbeing interested and making it interesting(opening the door)– Interested because of scencetid culture increase,science awareness, well-informed citizenship• On the relevance of what is beingcommunicated (rational) - serious• On making it attractive (emotional) – fun,games
  • Little Science Communicator Red Riding Hood• Dazzled Little Social Science CommunicatorRed Riding Hood is a part of a collection ofpeople that see IT and Web 2.0 as a newform of magic.• However, like magicians actually just createillusions, Society must know how to takeprofit from Web 2.0 cleverly, namely theUniversity and the other sectors of Society.• Digital divide (and perhaps scientific divide)does not shorten, but widens. We cannotstand it.• The wolf (will) eat(s) LRRH
  • Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  • This is me and my digitalcircumstances• And what I eat, what I read, what play with…– Archive– Social networks– Websites– Blog– Photos– Videos– Mobile devices– Computers, tablets, cell phones, etc.– 3D printers!
  • Tweetaudience• This presentation is available somewhere in thecyberspace• Audience:– Note taking– Ideas– Reflections– Tweets!!• Following• “in situ” evaluation• This is me, my circumstances, my arcive, my web/blog,and my social networks (and further – I’m the placewhere I am right now)
  • From wikipedia to Wolfram Alpha• The experience of the Catalan Wikipedia• Wikimedia Commons• Wikiprojectes, Wikibooks, etc.• Viquiproject Science Week 2011 and 2012• http://alpha.wolfram.com• On can ask about everything!• Stephen Wolfram: a new kind of science
  • Some ideas• Everyone should hava a fast and quality accessto Internet• Everyone should have a mobilde devide(smartphone, tablet)• Everyone should be able to obtaing formationi basic digital skills• Safe social networks, e-mail, etc… should be aCitizen Right• Twitter: should be make a Public Affair: it willbecome history, it will enter history
  • Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  • Pushing forward Open Science• SpotOn London 2012– http://www.nature.com/spoton• UKWebFocus blog– http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com
  • Alternative to 20st century publishing?• Open source software, open source beer…open publishing!• Open access (mandatory for EU in 2014)• Open data (… big data)• Just 3 examples from SpotOn Science HackDay– Figshare.com– Researchfish.com– http://www.frontiersin.org (open publishing)
  • Panton Principles: Principles for OpenData in Science.• http://pantonprinciples.org/• Science is based on building on, reusing andopenly criticising the published body ofscientific knowledge.• For science to effectively function, and forsociety to reap the full benefits from scientificendeavours, it is crucial that science data bemade open.
  • Example of Open Science• http://science.okfn.org• Open data• Open access• Open research• Open Science Foundation
  • Creative Commons License• Creative Commons– Attributes– ND– NC– SA– BY• http://creativecommons.org (see video inside)
  • Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  • And now researchers’ frontier:Outreach• The guardian: Going viral: Using social mediato publicise academic research• http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2011/apr/11/communications-marketing-management-admin-and-services
  • Outreach: compulsory?• Outreach is more and more relevant• It’s a duty of (senior) researchers• It’s interesting (and perhaps fun) for junior researchersand PhD students• Pushed by governments… but no much money• Loved by people out there• Universities, learned societies, associations, museums,… a network of disseminators• Social communication of research, science,knowledge• Leads to a well-informed society• Provides publications beyond scholarly papers - +cv
  • How we (scientists) can communicate• By origin– Personal– Groupal– Corporate• By destination– Indexed Journals / Scholar Publications– Science journals for scientists (eg Scientific American)– Science General for the Public (eg Quo, La Recherche)– Communicacion of Science Culture– Citizens Outreach– Childrens, Youth Outreach
  • How we (scientists) can communicate• Personal– Shows– Theater– Performances• By message– Own personal: PhD / researcher blog– News curation on a particular field of science– News curation on policy, funding, etc.– Contributing to shared blog– Contributing to research group
  • A few relevant reports• FECyT report on social perception of science• Articles by The Guardian• Reports by Fundación BBVA• SpotOn London• Enciende COSCE Report
  • FECyT report on Social Perception of Science:increased relevance of Science Communication 2.0• http://www.fecyt.es/fecyt/docs/tmp/363174605.pdf• There are no big changes writh respect to last edition, but onemust remark a couple of points: first, physicians and scientistscontinue to be the molst valued social groups amont ca. 8.000interviewed people; and second, the reports shows thatcitizens become increasingly informed about science with theInternet, especially through social networks. All inall, ScienceCommunication 2.0 is more relevant than ever.• There are no spectacular changes with respect to the latestedition, but one must pinpoint that 25% of those interviewedare not interested in science and technology because, simplystated, they do not understand them.
  • Science must be amusing so society’sculture can increase• http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/nov/04/geeks-comedians-academics-fun-science• “Geeks, comedians and academics are putting the fun back into science” isa post by The Guardina subtitled “Science used to be the opposite ofentertaining, but now sell-out tours featuring gags, songs and mini-lectures are a hit across the country”.• This post shows how Performing Arts use science to entertain, but howthey entertain by talking about science. The last sentence, however, isabout scientific social science:• “A few years ago, scientists would moan about an error they had seen onTV or when a minister made some incompetent statement about science.Nowadays, they act. The skeptics, and others who have found each otherthrough the shows curated by Ince and the books and columns of BenGoldacre, have become a social-media-enabled army of rationalists whohas stepped up to fight a scourge of anti-vaxxers, homeopaths, politicians,companies and, frankly, anyone else who misuses evidence.”• Not only one should complain when politicians make mistakes of TVchannels air Pseudoscientific programs. One must act. Scientits mustmove to reach a society with a stronger scientific culture.
  • Two reports by BBVA Foundation on socialperception of science• “Ciencia: la fe del que no sabe” is a report recently published by El País• http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/07/23/actualidad/1343072538_559229.html• It deals with a report by the BBVA Foundation “Cultura científica:actitudes ante la ciencia” (currently there is only the PPT presentation)• http://www.fbbva.es/TLFU/tlfu/esp/investigacion/fichainves/index.jsp?codigo=381• According to El País, this is the second part of something the samenewspaper dealt about, “Estudio internacional de la cultura científica”• http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/05/08/actualidad/1336502274_505761.html.• Nothing especially new and relevant, but it is interesting to know thetrends. Actually, they are well known: physicians, teachers and scientistsare those most valued (actually… physicians are not scientists?
  • Juggling with Science and itscommunication• Anne Osterrieder at SpotOn London coments her personal life: she had to communicatescience almost hidden; however, now she can combine reasonably well her biomedicalresearch with her communication activity. This means, in a kind of way, a jugglingattitude.• SpotOn London 2012: My not-so-secret-anymore double life: Juggling research andscience communication• http://www.nature.com/spoton/2012/11/spoton-london-2012-my-not-so-secret-anymore-double-life-juggling-research-and-science-communication• “Now I am a Research and Science Communication Fellow. This means that half of mytime is spent pursuing my research on plant organelles and establishing an independentresearch programme. The other half I spend on science communication: organizingevents and training workshops for staff and students, both internally and externally, andcontinuing with my own outreach projects.”• This researcher states a series of reccomendations that interesting; she asks to…– Find allies.– Get organized.– Evaluate.– Grow a thick skin.– Be proud of your accomplishments.
  • Enciende Report• COSCE (confederación sociedades científicasespañolas)• http://www.cosce.org/pdf/Informe_ENCIENDE.pdf• Reflexiones y recomendaciones para una mejora dela educación científica en edades tempranas enEspaña desde los sectores científico, social y de laenseñanza de las ciencias
  • Relevant article• More than a blog: Should science bloggers stickto popularizing science and fightingcreationism, or does blogging have a wider roleto play in the scientific discoursehan a blog:?• http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v12/n11/full/embor2011201a.html?WT.ec_id=EMBOR-201111
  • The Guardian• How should researchers talk about science tothe public?• http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/feb/20/making-science-accessible
  • Public Engagementhttps://www.publicengagement.ac.uk
  • Engaging thru the Internethttp://Science140.org(+ ciencia140 + catciencia140.net)
  • Humour is very important! Famelabhttp://famelab.org
  • Outreach possibilities• What?– Our work– Someone elses work– Sound knowledge– Citizen Science– Public awareness• On the spot– Demonstrative– Pedagogic/teaching Spectacular• Internet– Blogging/website– Science Blogs @ Newspapers Contests– Etc
  • Two new skills• Of the various skills involved in a digital world,besides being able to surf the Internet, wrtie ablog, take a picture …• One must be able to selfcast (i.e., produce shortvideoclips –like write short pieces) – new literac• Be able to survive the so-called gossipeconsystems• And also structure presentations, mentalmappng, cloud sharing, social networking, etc.
  • Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  • Outreach in an actual group• Two communications buy the @c4dudg toInternational Science Communicationmeeting, Nancy - and INTED, València:– PPT "Is digital communication an actual, cleverway to disseminate science?”– PPT "Imagine! - some trends in recreationalscience and the pursue of science careers”• See them in http://slideshare.net/quelgir
  • C4D UdGhttp://c4d.udg.edu
  • Let me bring my own case• Levels of action:– Coordinating UdG’s science dissemination– Involving in C4D’s activities– Personal activities• Types of action:– Communicating results of research (academic)– Talks (e.g. quasicrystalls)– Outreach (Researchers’ Night, Science Fairs)– Shows (e.g. Magic and Science)• Reason: because we need to increase Society’sScientific Culture, and we must promote Scienceawareness.
  • And also have a look to …• Take a look at my blog Edunomia, category“comciencia”– http://edunomia.net• And also my mesoblog “Molecularity Report”– http://edunoming.wordpress.com• And even my curation space in Scoop.It“Impromptu topics”– http://www.scoop.it/u/quelet
  • Engaging thru recreational sciencehttp://Estalella20.net
  • Flow• Why communicate?• This is a digital world (too)• An open knowledge society• Outreach, public awareness, feekback• Our particular case• Final thoughts
  • RRI: How do we receive feedback?• Meetings with Research and Innovationstockholders at UdG’s Science and TechnologyPark (i.e., companies, private sector)• Meeting parents and families at outreachactivities• By means of online activities• Bringing young students to the University,practical activities• Formal interaction with other Public Institutions,government officials, elected citzens• Above all: be active!
  • Some challenges and difficulties• RRI, Web 2.0, Social Networking, Communicating Research – israther an attitude• There is a paramount task yet in involving and motivating(good) researchers, research groups and academic units incommunicating (well!) Research and Science.• Dissemination of Research and Public Outreach is hindered bycurrent issues.• There is a high pressure (Publish of Perish, Transfer or Die, etc.)that does not free time enough to get involved in PublicOutreach and Dissemination activities• A proper system of Rewards could be established to catalyzeand promote Science and Research communication.
  • OK. We’ve got the point – and now what?• Let’s movilize• Let’s change• Let’s move• Let’s do thinkgs well• Let’s concentrate• Let’s keep freedom• Let’s catalyze a positive attidude• Let’s (place here your favourite call to action)
  • My favourite chemist…Panoramix, the druid
  • Ciència i Futurde laHumanitat,G. Iffrah, Histoire des Xiffres• Science is knowlege that becomes true bymeans of criticism (S. Bachelard)• Invention in theoretical science has thecharacter of discovery, but it is a disconvery inthe worlk of mind (L. de Broglie)• All science is just a depuration of dailythinking (A. Einstein)• (note: look for those people’s quotes!)
  • And now, three quotes...• Education is not a preparation for life, It is lifeitself• Your attitude is a choice• Education: there is a treasure insideThus:Communicating Science (and hence RRI) is anattitude. Everyone can communicate well ifprovided with relevant skills.