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Lesson 10
 

Lesson 10

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  • GCSE AQA 2012 - TV Crime Drama Lesson 10.ppt
  • GCSE AQA 2012 - TV Crime Drama Lesson 10.ppt
  • GCSE AQA 2012 - TV Crime Drama Lesson 10.ppt
  • GCSE AQA 2012 - TV Crime Drama Lesson 10.ppt
  • GCSE AQA 2012 - TV Crime Drama Lesson 10.ppt
  • GCSE AQA 2012 - TV Crime Drama Lesson 10.ppt
  • GCSE AQA 2012 - TV Crime Drama Lesson 10.ppt

Lesson 10 Lesson 10 Presentation Transcript

  • Aims• To be confident in applying narrative theories• To gain knowledge and understanding of a range of different narrative techniques and be able to apply these to a range of TV crime dramas 1
  • Todorov’s Five-Part Structure• Match the stages of Todorov’s theory with the description.• Then match this to the well-known story of ‘Cinderella’. 2
  • Useful Narrative TermsClosed narrative Where the narrative has a definitive ending and all problems/crimes are solved.Open narrative Where the narrative is open to be added on to; this could be in the form of a sequel or a part 2. There isn’t a definitive ending.Cliffhanger Where the narrative is left open with the audience not knowing what will happen next. Used to keep the audience interested and in the hope that they will watch on.Red herring A technique where the audience or the characters are led to believe something different; they are tricked or ‘led up the wrong garden path’.Suspense Where a text builds up a feeling of anxiety and uncertainty about the outcome amongst the audience. This could be through music, editing or the characters’ actions.Multi-strand Where there are a number of different stories within one media text.Circular narrative Where the narrative goes full circle and the ending/resolution is the same as the beginning/equilibrium.Montage A type of editing whereby a mixture of different shots/images, usually over time, is edited together to give the effect that time has passed.Prologue An introduction/preface to the narrative seen before the opening sequence.Ellipsis A technique used to miss out big chunks of time.Flashback A point in the story that visits the past before coming back to the present day. 3
  • Narrative Theories• Todorov’s five-part structure• Vladimir Propp’s character types: – Hero – Villain – Princess – The false hero – The donor – The princess’ father – The helper• Claude Levi-Strauss’ binary oppositions – Where opposites are used to create conflict and drive the narrative forward, e.g. man vs woman, good vs bad, police v crime. 4
  • Activity• Watch the following clip taken from a TV crime drama. 1. Apply any relevant narrative theories. 2. Identify any narrative techniques that have been used. 3. Evaluate how effectively the above have been used – this meets AO4. 5
  • Your Idea• You should write a brief five-part Todorov structure for a possible one hour episode of your TV crime drama. – Write a character analysis – using Propp’s character types. – Make a list of possible binary oppositions within your narrative. – Explain how you will use three narrative techniques within your episode. 6
  • Reviewing the Aims• To be confident in applying narrative theories• To gain knowledge and understanding of a range of different narrative techniques and be able to apply these to a range of TV crime dramas• To be able to think independently (SEAL/PLTS) 7