Introduction to Behavioral Safety
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Introduction to Behavioral Safety

on

  • 15,388 views

Introduction to Behavioral Safety (preconference workshop) by Grainne A. Matthews, Ph.D.

Introduction to Behavioral Safety (preconference workshop) by Grainne A. Matthews, Ph.D.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
15,388
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
13,555
Embed Views
1,833

Actions

Likes
4
Downloads
785
Comments
1

7 Embeds 1,833

http://www.qualitysafetyedge.com 1733
http://www.slideshare.net 47
http://qualitysafetyedge.com 39
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 10
https://learningedge.edgehill.ac.uk 2
http://www.qsesafety.com 1
http://www.slideee.com 1
More...

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Hi team, am so much grateful/thankful for share with me safety information. information is power. i promise to share to my staff for a safe workplace and more to that dear universe.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Introduction to Behavioral Safety Introduction to Behavioral Safety Presentation Transcript

    • Introduction to Behavioral Safety Grainne A. Matthews, Ph.D. Quality Safety Edge Behavioural Safety Now Conference 2006 Pre conference Workshop Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 1
    • Module One: Introduction Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 2
    • Workshop Agenda  Behavioral Safety  Where did it come from?  Why does anyone need it?  What is it?  How does it work?  What’s involved in implementation?  What does it take to be successful? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 3
    • Introductions  Please introduce yourselves to each other  Appoint a spokesperson for your table  What is the most important question your table would like answered today? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 4
    • Behavioral Safety  Evidence-based process that achieves…  Significant safety improvements as measured by…  Increase in people working safely  Increase in safe conditions  Decrease in people getting hurt  As a result of…  Observations & Feedback  Goals & Celebrations  Analysis & Action Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 5
    • Ground Rules  What ground rules would you like to have? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 6
    • Module Two: Case for Change Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 7
    • Name That Hazard  List 25 hazards, risks, dangers, or potential injuries employees face in your industry.  Examples  Trip and fall on stairs  Back strain from heavy lifting  Cut by a utility knife  First table to 25 wins! Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 8
    • Safety Improvements Equipment & Safety Management Work System Environment Identify, Policies & Procedures Assess, and Training & Reminders Control Hazards Incentives & Discipline Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 9
    • The Safety Triangle Deaths* Lost Workday Cases 1 10 Research Medical Attention Cases 100 Speculation First Aid Cases 1,000 Near Miss Cases Unsafe Behaviors or Conditions 10,000 *Not enough data Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 10
    • Safety Triangle  Let’s create our own safety triangle Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 11
    • YES NO Safety Triangle  A company that has 1 lost time injury, 10 recordable injuries, & no near miss reports has a reliable reporting system.  A company that has a rate of 2 lost workday cases should expect 20 medical attention cases.  Focusing on unsafe behaviors & conditions is more effective in reducing injuries than focusing on incident rates.  Complacency comes from not understanding the risk or knowing the safe procedure. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 12
    • Our Clients Behavior 76% Conditions & Behavior 20% Conditions 4% Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 13
    • Behavior + Conditions Condition Behavior Serious Injuries Worn carpet Reading documents Lots of furniture Trip on carpet, fall over chair, twist ankle Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 14
    • Injury Prevention Path Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 15
    • YES NO Preventing Injuries  Behavior plays a very minor role in causing injuries.  Many serious injuries are caused by a combination of behavior & conditions.  Behavioral safety ignores conditions. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 16
    • Everything Safety  List the programs you use to help employees work safely  Examples  Safety moments  Office inspections by safety staff  Job Task Analysis  Team with most items in 1 minute wins! Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 17
    • Current Safety Management  Policies & procedures  Formal & informal training  Safety meetings  Awareness efforts  Safety meetings  Competitions  Safety committees  Safety moments  Monitoring  Inspections  Audits  Safety incentives  Progressive discipline Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 18
    • Your Programs  Do all of your programs fall into one of these categories? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 19
    • Effective Programs  Effective programs to promote safety behavior provide:  Clear instructions before the safe practice  Frequent, positive feedback soon after the safe practice  Which of the programs on the list provide clear instructions?  Which provide frequent, positive, immediate feedback? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 20
    • Current Safety Management Instructions Frequent, Positive, Before? Immediate Feedback After?  Policies & procedures  Formal & informal training  Safety meetings  Awareness efforts  Safety meetings  Competitions  Safety committees  Safety moments  Monitoring  Inspections  Audits  Safety incentives  Progressive discipline Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 21
    • Common Problems  Reactive because metrics are lagging indicators  Less than optimal employee involvement  Under-reporting of near misses & minor injuries  Incident rate plateau but unpredictable incidents Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 22
    • Typical Injury Data 4.0 3.5 3.0 Rate per 200,000 work hours 2.5 2.0 TRIR LDR 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 23
    • Beyond a Safety Plateau Equipment & Safety Behavioral Work Management Safety Environment System Policies & Procedures Involve employees Identify, Training & Reminders Observe & feedback Assess, and Incentives & Discipline Remove barriers Control Hazards Recognize & celebrate Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 24
    • Module Three: Why Behavioral Safety Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 25
    • Feedback  Penny Toss  Three main points 1. ? 2. ? 3. ? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 26
    • YES NO Penny Toss  Feedback has more influence than instructions.  The ONLY problem with negative feedback is that it doesn’t increase successful behavior.  No feedback allows people to figure out how to be successful on their own.  Natural feedback sometimes overpowers human feedback. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 27
    • Values Based Safety Process Video  Five main points 1. ? 2. ? 3. ? 4. ? 5. ? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 28
    • What’s The Difference?  How is Behavioral Safety different from current safety management?  List five differences 1. ? 2. ? 3. ? 4. ? 5. ? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 29
    • What is Behavioral Safety?  Feedback – the Heart and Soul of the process  Trained people watch someone working and provide positive or frequent feedback on safe practices from a checklist of pinpointed safety practices.  They discuss any concerns and opportunities to improve safety.  They take any possible immediate action to improve safety. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 30
    • Key Features  Anonymous  Voluntary  Immediate feedback  Positive focus  Short and simple  Discipline-free Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 31
    • What is Behavioral Safety?  Local control – Steering Committee  Employee-led, management supported  Provide feedback weekly on observed practices  Use checklist information to improve safety  Encourage participation through recognition and celebration  Involve others through feedback and goal setting Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 32
    • Does It Work? 11 Behavioral 12 Safety Process 10 8 6 6 5 4 4 4 2 0 0 Year Before Year After Lost Time Injuries Medical Aid Injuries Vehicle Injuries Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 33
    • Does It Work? 2.5 Values-Based Safety Lost Time Incident Rate 2 No. per 200,000 work hours 1.5 1 0.5 0 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 34
    • Does It Work? 35 30 25 20 15 TRR LTIR 10 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Year Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 35
    • Multiple Effects Feedback to “Observer Effect” Observee 25% 50% 25% Action Plans by Safety Committee Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 36
    • Power of Positive Reinforcement 1000000 100000 10000 Discretionary Performance 1000 100 10 “Have-To” Performance 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 37
    • Module Four: Values in Action Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 38
    • Creating Culture Mission & Goals Technology Values Change Behavior Achieve Results Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 39
    • Creating Safety Culture Reduce Injuries Observation, Respect, Integrity, Feedback, Accountability, Remove barriers Initiative Change Safety and Interpersonal Behaviors Achieve Results – The right way Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 40
    • Project Structure Design Phase Implementation Leadership Staff ManagementStaff Leadership Committee Safety Staff Safety Staff Design Team Steering Committee Area Teams Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 41
    • Project Steps Assessment Educate Design Team & Orientation Design Team designs Validate process Roll Out Follow Up • Train area teams with Area Evaluate • Train area leadership Teams • Train employees Implementation • Staff conduct observations • Steering Committee manages • Leadership monitors Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 42
    • Possible Integration Areas  Reward & incentive systems  Performance review  Data management  Safety Committees  Orientation of new hires  Ongoing training Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 43
    • Critical Success Features  Address issues of majority of people, not CAVE people.  Change systems that conflict with safe practices.  Initial focus on process & outcome measures rather than results.  True employee empowerment – skills, resources, & follow through.  Leaders held accountable for their support of the process. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 44
    • YES NO Values in Action  Behavioral Safety changes only the culture, not the injury rate.  The main reason Behavioral Safety reduces injuries is because we find more mistakes with more observations.  Behavioral Safety may result in significant changes in our hiring, training, promoting, and purchasing systems. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 45
    • Module Five: Planning Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 46
    • Some Design Questions  Who will conduct observations?  Who will be observed?  When and how often?  What happens to the checklist?  How will I participate?  How will we reinforce participation? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 47
    • Typical Procedure  Announce the observation.  Observe for 2 – 3 minutes.  Check if you think the observed practice is safe or if you have a concern.  If you check Concern, describe what you saw.  Check the 2–3 most important safe items & 1 concern (if any) on which you plan to give feedback.  Provide immediate positive feedback and discuss one concerns. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 48
    • Area Teams  Who will be on the area teams?  How will they analyze the data?  How will they communicate with employees?  How will they work with leadership to change systems that affect safety?  How will they make improvements to the process? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 49
    • Leadership Role  Participate  Observations and feedback  Steering Committee and area teams  Support  Committee and teams  Budget  Respond to recommendations  Monitor  Ensure the process is successful  Continuous improvement Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 50
    • Impact of Leader Participation 1998 14 Locations % Employee Participation 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 80% - 100% 40% – 60% 0 – 20% Level of First Line Supervisor Participation 43% Correlation Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 51
    • Impact of Leader Participation 1999 10 Locations 80 % Employee Participation 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 >80% 60-70% <40% Level of First and Second Line Participation 78% Correlation Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 52
    • Module Six: Observation and Feedback Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 53
    • Observing and Describing Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 54
    • Observation Checklists  Target significant practices  Analysis of incidents  Simple & short  Practices are pinpointed  Observable  Objective  Specific  Active Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 55
    • Video  Giving Feedback  Four steps  Six guidelines 1. ? 1. ? 2. ? 2. ? 3. ? 3. ? 4. ? 4. ? 5. ? 6. ? Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 56
    • Basic Feedback Model  Describe the action or result, not the person  “I notice you have positioned your monitor so that your eyes are level with the center of the screen.”  NOT: “You are ergonomically correct.”  Describe reason for the practice  “That can prevent neck and back strain.”  Listen to response Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 57
    • Positive Feedback  Role play providing POSITIVE feedback based on your first observation  Use Feedback Worksheet  Rotate roles Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 58
    • Suggestions  Talk with individual – maybe later  Discuss in area safety meeting  Consult with resources  Primary rule: Don’t argue! Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 59
    • YES NO Feedback  The purpose of observations is to catch people working safely.  Completely review the checklist with the person.  Make sure they don’t say anything.  Make sure they don’t see the checklist.  Emphasize your concerns. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 60
    • Behavioral Safety Process  Employees observe & discuss significant practices  Safety Committee analyzes data & recommends action  Leaders respond to recommendations and take action  Safety Committee recognizes individuals for support & celebrates meeting goals Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 61
    • Key Features  Universal participation  Frequent, quality participation by everyone  Employee designed and managed  Frequent, quality Action Plans by employee-led Safety Committee  Leadership monitored and supported  Frequent, quality responses to recommendations by leaders  Pay attention to process and contributions of individuals Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 62
    • YES NO Workshop Evaluation  I never thought Behavioral Safety would be this complicated.  I am enthusiastic & excited about this new approach.  I am totally confused.  I think this process could really make a difference at my company. Copyright Quality Safety Edge © 2006 63