Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey

480

Published on

Toronto Safer Nightlife Forum 2011: …

Toronto Safer Nightlife Forum 2011:

How can you contribute to a safe, vibrant nightlife?

Tuesday November 8, 2011
2:30pm – 6:00pm

Hyatt Regency Hotel - Regency Ballroom B
370 King Street West

Join us for a conversation with youth and bar/club operators about safety issues in Toronto's nightlife scene. Topics include pre-drinking, illicit drugs, sexual aggression and strategies for reducing harm. Come out and share your views and ideas for creating safer bars and clubs.

Jerry Levitan (lawyer, musician and Academy Award nominee) will moderate the forum. Speakers include Yamina-Sara Chekroun (youth outreach worker/event promoter), Nav Sangha (venue owner/DJ), Mike Homewood (Homewood Security) and Samantha Wells (Centre for Addiction & Mental Health).

Featuring DJ VRAK, with light refreshments provided.

For more information go to www.safernightlife.info

This event is brought to you by the Toronto Safer Nightlife Committee comprised of youth, TRIP!, Toronto Public Health, the Alcohol & Gaming Commission of Ontario, the Centre for Addiction & Mental Health, Asian Community AIDS Services, the Entertainment District Business Improvement Area, the Parkdale Village Business Improvement Area, the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas, Social Development, Finance & Administration and Municipal Licensing & Standards.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
480
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Predrinking was common across all age groups Frequency – youth 25-29 reported slightly higher frequencies of predrinking with 39% “ always ” and 43% “ often ” Binge drinking is 5 drinks No gender differences found for any of the predrinking questions Limitation – didn ’ t ask if they kept drinking when got to the bar, and if so, how much they drank
  • Predrinking was common across all age groups Frequency – youth 25-29 reported slightly higher frequencies of predrinking with 39% “ always ” and 43% “ often ” Binge drinking is 5 drinks No gender differences found for any of the predrinking questions
  • Across all age groups respondents said main reason they stopped drinking was when they felt drunk enough Younger youth (19-29%) have more bravado about it – 40% said they can “ go all night ” No gender differences
  • We don ’ t know the frequency of drug use Although the sample was small (9), 89% of transgendered people reported using drugs
  • We don ’ t know the frequency of drug use Although the sample was small (9), 89% of transgendered people reported using drugs Predrinking and illicit drug use together – we don ’ t know if this is happening concurrently. It may be they drink at home and use drugs when they get to the club
  • No gender differences No major age differences although youth aged 19-24 seemed to be most respectful
  • Youth under18 and over 30 may be drinking less that the 19-29 year olds re: OD No major gender differences found Respondents over age 30 were more likely not to report any of the identified harms in the survey list (33%)
  • Approached to buy drugs – consistent across all age groups with lowest for age 30. Of concern, 78% of youth under 18 report being approached so must be happening in all ages events
  • Transcript

    • 1. Toronto SaferNightlife.info Survey Lisa Campbell Salazar TRIP! Coordinator Design by Carver Manuel-Smith Toronto Safer Nightlife Forum November 8, 2011
    • 2. Tweet with Us!
      • #SaferNightlife
    • 3. Purpose of the Survey
      • To explore potentially risky behaviours of youth aged 19-29 in nightlife scene.
      • To explore youth perceptions of practices in bars/clubs that may create risk/harm.
      • To explore youth perceptions of practices in bars/clubs that may reduce risk/harm.
    • 4. How the Survey Was Conducted
      • Led by TRIP! to inform work of Toronto Safer Nightlife Committee.
      • Survey was conducted in Summer 2010
      • In line and online surveys
      • May be some bias toward TRIP! clients
      • Cross-tabs: age, gender, frequency of pre-drinking and area of residency
    • 5. Who Participated?
      • 334 people participated
      • 71% were in target population = 19-29 year olds
      • 53% female, 43% male, 1% transgendered, and 3% “ other ”
      • Majority (75%) from Toronto
    • 6. Total Distribution in the GTA:
    • 7. Distribution in Toronto
    • 8. Pre-drinking
      • 90% of respondents pre-drink
      • Frequency of pre-drinking – about 33% each “ sometimes, often, always ”
      • Pre-drinking decreased with age
      • Typical number of pre-drinks = 3 to 5
      • 16% had 5 to 10 drinks before going out
      • No gender differences across questions
    • 9. Reasons for Pre-Drinking
      • 90% to save money
      • 78% to socialize with friends
      • Consistent with literature
      • Other reasons included:
        • Lower inhibitions
        • Reduce social anxiety
        • Play drinking games
        • Get drunk
    • 10. Determining drinking limit
      • 62% - when felt “ drunk enough ”
      • 36% - when ran out of money
      • 34% - when felt ill
      • 32% - at last call
      • Key goal is to get drunk
      • Older respondents less likely to drink to point of sickness
    • 11. Illicit drug use
      • Majority (80%) use illicit drugs while in bars and clubs
      • More young men (88%) than women (74%) report use
      • More common among youth 19-29
      • Of concern, 76% of youth under 18 use illicit drugs in bars and clubs
    • 12. Illicit Drug Use
      • Top drugs used :
        • Amphetamine-type
        • substances
        • (i.e. MDMA/ecstasy)
        • Hallucinogens
        • (i.e. Ketamine)
        • Cannabis
      • 81% reported both pre-drinking and illicit drug use in bars/clubs
    • 13. Mindful of local residents
      • 58% tried to be mindful
      • 27% said it depended how drunk they were
      • Some said depended on area – didn ’ t see ED as residential area
      • No differences between youth living in Toronto vs. youth from outside city
    • 14. Health and Safety Issues
      • Harms related to substance use:
        • Illness (vomiting, blacking or passing out)
        • Losing personal belongings
        • Injury
      • Harms most often reported by frequent pre-drinkers
      • Youth under 18 and over 30 had lowest incidence of OD/alcohol poisoning
    • 15. Health and Safety Harms
      • 75% were approached to buy drugs in bars/clubs
      • Sexual and physical assaults – by patrons and bar/security staff.
      • Sexual assault reported most often by women (19-29).
      • Respondents over age 30 less likely to report assault or drug-related issues.
    • 16. Harm reduction /safety strategies
      • Majority took some action to reduce harm; most frequent strategies:
        • Buddy system (70%)
        • Eating/sleeping well before going out (69%)
        • Drinking water throughout evening (68%)
        • Limiting use of alcohol/other drugs (50%)
        • Not mixing alcohol/other drugs (40%)
      • More women than men used HR strategies
    • 17. Harm reduction/safety strategies
      • Safe transportation options:
        • Public transit (80%)
        • Walk (68%)
        • Taxi (52%)
        • Shared ride (47%)
      • We don ’ t know if driver had been drinking in “ shared ride ” example.
    • 18. Potentially Harmful Bar Practices/Conditions
      • Key issues raised by youth:
        • No access to free drinking water
        • Being treated badly after becoming ill due to substance use
      • Other issues:
        • Forced to check coat (68%)
        • Being kicked out in winter without coat (21%)
        • Being separated from friends who had been kicked out
    • 19. Potentially harmful bar practices/conditions
      • Key issues related to the physical bar environment:
        • Lack of air conditioning/poor ventilation (86%)
        • Overcrowding (86%)
        • “ Unsafe ” venues (52%)
    • 20. Positive Bar Practices
      • Can refill water bottle (72%)
      • Access to free, cold drinking water (72%)
      • Can take drink everywhere, including bathroom (50%)
      • Access to safer sex/drug use info (64%)
      • Access to chill out room (57%)
      • Access to medic room (46%)
    • 21. Worst Experiences in Bars/Clubs
      • Mistreatment by security staff:
        • Physical and sexual assault
        • Drug dealing
        • Drug exploitation
      • Physical and sexual assault by other patrons
      • Lack of access to free drinking water
    • 22. Best Experiences in Bars/Clubs
      • Cab stands & designated driver programs
      • Health and harm reduction supports
      • Benefits of good (nice) security
        • “ To tell you the truth, raves always have the best safety set-ups in the city because they take the preventative measures necessary to keep kids safe. Clubs never ASSUME drug use, and as a result, they have a less informed, safety-conscious set of patrons.”
    • 23. Suggestions for Action
      • Some youth did make suggestions for action, including:
        • More chill out and medic rooms
        • Support from bar staff during illness or overdose
        • More harm reduction information and services available
    • 24. Keep the Conversation Going Follow Us: @SaferNightlife @tripproject Facebook.com/TRIPProject TRIP! Project www.safernightlife.info [email_address]

    ×