The Peace Treaties After The First World War

6,279 views
6,030 views

Published on

Published in: Travel
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
6,279
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
29
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
83
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Peace Treaties After The First World War

  1. 1. The peace treaties after the first world war: were they fair?
  2. 2. You know it makes sense!!!! Aaaaahhhhh
  3. 3. Lesson objectives: <ul><li>To have a clear understanding of the Paris Peace Conference. </li></ul><ul><li>To consider the mood and public opinion in 1919. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Starter: Examine the range of statements and then decide which apply to which country in 1919. Draw a line to like the statement that best fits the country. Britain France. USA Germany. A former world power whose empire was crumbling. A late comer to the war who wanted to avoid being drawn into another European conflict. A country that had never actually surrendered or been forced off enemy soil. A country that presented ideas for the peaceful coexistence of states to prevent further major conflict. A country wanting to remain a global power but reliant on another country for financial backing. A country keen to seek revenge against those that had been aggressive towards it. A nation suffering from bankruptcy and with a starving population. A country that had seen much of its land destroyed by war and whose economy had been devastated.
  5. 5. Task 1 – discussion points. <ul><li>Germany had asked for cease fire. The German army was exhausted and British naval blockades were stopping food and resources getting to Germany – slowly the German population was starving to death. </li></ul><ul><li>Germany did not surrender and the German army was still massed on French soil. </li></ul><ul><li>Germany was simply in a position whereby she couldn’t carry on fighting but she hadn’t been defeated. </li></ul><ul><li>The peace conference decided what was to happen – it lasted 12 months and Germany wasn’t invited. (non of the losing countries were asked to attend). </li></ul><ul><li>Do you think Germany was ever going to get a fair outcome? Think about this point and try to come up with a reason for your answer. </li></ul><ul><li>If Germany had invaded France and most of the fighting had taken place in France how do you think French would have felt towards the Germans in 1919? </li></ul>
  6. 6. Task 2 <ul><li>Listen to the pod cast. </li></ul><ul><li>Now take two minutes to read the range of questions on the quiz sheet. </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to the pod cast again and have a go at answering the questions. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Pod cast questions. </li></ul><ul><li>We are learning about the of the population? </li></ul><ul><li>Who were the big three? </li></ul><ul><li>On what date was the Treaty of Versailles signed? </li></ul><ul><li>Germany had to sign the treaty on what basis? </li></ul><ul><li>How is the pod cast designed? </li></ul><ul><li>Who were the leaders of the big three? </li></ul><ul><li>Which two countries were most seriously effected by WW1? </li></ul><ul><li>What had almost every British family lost during the war? </li></ul><ul><li>In what year did Russia withdraw from WW1? </li></ul><ul><li>Clemenceau was angry at the cost in lives for the French nation. What figure was mentioned on the pod cast? </li></ul><ul><li>What 3 things did France want to do to Germany? </li></ul><ul><li>What was Wilson’s view on Germany? </li></ul><ul><li>What was Wilson’s main aim? He wanted to turn Germany into ……………… </li></ul><ul><li>How many points did Wilson publish? </li></ul><ul><li>What was significant about point 14? </li></ul><ul><li>On what ground was David Lloyd George in with reference to the treatment Germany should receive? </li></ul><ul><li>How did Lloyd George want to see Germany punished? </li></ul><ul><li>What did Lloyd George want Germany and the UK to start doing again? </li></ul><ul><li>How did ordinary people in the UK want Germany to be treated? </li></ul><ul><li>How long was this pod cast? You’ve listened to it twice!! </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Pod cast questions. </li></ul><ul><li>We are learning about the mood of the population? </li></ul><ul><li>Who were the big three? Britain, France and the USA. </li></ul><ul><li>On what date was the Treaty of Versailles signed? 28 June 1919. </li></ul><ul><li>Germany had to sign the treaty on what basis? Take it or leave it. </li></ul><ul><li>How is the pod cast designed? To help you understand why the treaty was the way it was. </li></ul><ul><li>Who were the leaders of the big three? Lloyd George, Clemenceau, Wilson. </li></ul><ul><li>Which two countries were most seriously effected by WW1? France and Belgium </li></ul><ul><li>What had almost every British family lost during the war? A family member </li></ul><ul><li>In what year did Russia withdraw from WW1? 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>Clemenceau was angry at the cost in lives for the French nation. What figure was mentioned on the pod cast? 2/3 </li></ul><ul><li>What 3 things did France want to do to Germany? cripple, break up and weaken. </li></ul><ul><li>What was Wilson’s view on Germany? Germany should be punished </li></ul><ul><li>What was Wilson’s main aim? He wanted to turn Germany into ……………… democratic country. </li></ul><ul><li>How many points did Wilson publish? 14 </li></ul><ul><li>What was significant about point 14? League of Nations. </li></ul><ul><li>On what ground was David Lloyd George in with reference to the treatment Germany should receive? Middle ground </li></ul><ul><li>How did Lloyd George want to see Germany punished? Lose their navy and colonies. </li></ul><ul><li>What did Lloyd George want Germany and the UK to start doing again? Trading. </li></ul><ul><li>How did ordinary people in the UK want Germany to be treated? Punish harshly. </li></ul><ul><li>How long was this pod cast? You’ve listened to it twice!! 7:16 </li></ul>
  9. 9. Task 3 <ul><li>Turn to page 80 – read information. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete the activity at the bottom of page 81. </li></ul>

×