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J417 Ck Grids Paper II
J417 Ck Grids Paper II
J417 Ck Grids Paper II
J417 Ck Grids Paper II
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J417 Ck Grids Paper II

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Paper II revision grids - based on the specification key questions

Paper II revision grids - based on the specification key questions

Published in: Education, News & Politics
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  • 1. J417 OCR Modern World History B Paper 2 – A972 – British Depth Study 1890-1918 http://gcsehistory.wetpaint.com
  • 2. Paper II – British Depth Study 1890-1918 <ul><li>Rowntree and Booth </li></ul><ul><li>Seebohm Rowntree 1901 found 30% people living below the poverty line </li></ul><ul><li>Produced evidence people were poor not because they drank too much but because of economy </li></ul><ul><li>3 times vulnerable as a young child, old, sick or unemployed </li></ul><ul><li>Booth studied London 1886-1903 </li></ul>Cultural achievements KEY QUESTIONS:- 1906 - the Trades Disputes Act ruled that unions were not liable for damages because of strikes. 1906 - the Workers Compensation Act granted compensation for injury at work. 1907 - school medical inspections. 1908 - eight-hour day for miners. 1910 - half-day a week off for shop workers. A Merchant Shipping Act improved conditions for sailors. From 1911, MPs were paid. This gave working men the opportunity to stand for election. <ul><li>Children’s Charter </li></ul><ul><li>Churches and local councils provided schools and looked after orphans </li></ul><ul><li>1906 Education Act </li></ul><ul><li>Allowed local councils to provide free school meals </li></ul><ul><li>1907 councils forced to provide meals </li></ul><ul><li>1908 Children and Young Persons Act – made children protected person. Parents could be prosecuted for ill treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Other regulations on children working </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons for Liberal Reforms </li></ul><ul><li>Social reformers </li></ul><ul><li>Idealism – people like David Lloyd George believed rich should help poor </li></ul><ul><li>Army – 1899-1902 Boer War proved men not fit enough to fight </li></ul><ul><li>Industry – UK lost its place as world’s economic super power </li></ul><ul><li>Labour – Libs worried about growth </li></ul><ul><li>OAP and National Insurance and Labour Exchanges </li></ul><ul><li>1909 OAP </li></ul><ul><li>Anyone over 70 with no income given 5 shillings, married couple 7s 6d </li></ul><ul><li>1911 National Insurance Act </li></ul><ul><li>Protect against illness and unemployment </li></ul><ul><li>1909 Labour Exchanges - bit like job centres – by 1913 finding 3000 jobs per day for workers </li></ul>Big Question:- How was British society changed 1890-1918?
  • 3. Paper II – British Depth Study 1890-1918 <ul><li>Women & the Vote </li></ul><ul><li>1906 most men could vote, no women could </li></ul><ul><li>Some women were opposed to them getting the vote </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of ordinary working women didn’t care </li></ul><ul><li>Most men were opposed, some thought right idea but best done slowly </li></ul>Cultural achievements KEY QUESTIONS:- <ul><li>Reaction of the authorities </li></ul><ul><li>Suffragette action made the government stubborn </li></ul><ul><li>As soon as campaign turned violent it was unlikely to get the vote </li></ul><ul><li>Force feeding went on in prison – so govt. allowed Suffragettes to go home, and then come back when recovered – Cat and Mouse Act </li></ul><ul><li>Women during the War – </li></ul><ul><li>When war broke out the campaign was interrupted and women supported the war effort </li></ul><ul><li>Pankhursts encouraged young men to volunteer to fight </li></ul><ul><li>1914-18 women started to work in offices, munitions factories, armed forces and in medical services </li></ul><ul><li>1916 – Lloyd George became PM and House of Commons began debating the bill for suffrage in 1917 </li></ul><ul><li>NUWSS and WSPU </li></ul><ul><li>NUWSS – Suffragists </li></ul><ul><li>Leader Millicent Fawcett </li></ul><ul><li>500 local branches </li></ul><ul><li>Orderly and well organised – wrote letters </li></ul><ul><li>WSPU – Suffragettes </li></ul><ul><li>Militant – Emmeline Pankhurst leader </li></ul><ul><li>Hunger strikes </li></ul><ul><li>June 1913 Emily Davison – Derby Day </li></ul><ul><li>Situation by 1918 – </li></ul><ul><li>Representation of the People Act 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>Passed by HOC and HOL in 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>9 million women given vote </li></ul><ul><li>all women over age of 30 </li></ul><ul><li>women over 21 who were householders or married to house holders </li></ul><ul><li>Women voted in Dec 1918 </li></ul>Big Question:- How was British society changed 1890-1918?
  • 4. Paper II – British Depth Study 1890-1918 <ul><li>1918 Representation of the People Act </li></ul><ul><li>Representation of the People Act 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>Passed by HOC and HOL in 1918 </li></ul><ul><li>9 million women given vote </li></ul><ul><li>all women over age of 30 </li></ul><ul><li>women over 21 who were householders or married to house holders </li></ul><ul><li>Women voted in Dec 1918 </li></ul>Cultural achievements KEY QUESTIONS:- <ul><li>DORA 1914 8 Aug 1914 </li></ul><ul><li>Extended several times during the war to give govt. more power </li></ul><ul><li>govt could take control of the land, buildings and whole industries </li></ul><ul><li>controlled food production and consumption </li></ul><ul><li>controlled information through propaganda and censorship </li></ul><ul><li>Britain’s war economy did better than the Germans </li></ul><ul><li>The mood of the British People at the end of the War </li></ul><ul><li>Propaganda had tried to make nation pull together – during the war the TUC called for workers not to take holidays </li></ul><ul><li>End of war – “squeeze Germany like a lemon” at the peace talks </li></ul><ul><li>Only happy with a Treaty that punishes Germany </li></ul><ul><li>Lloyd George concerned re-Empire and trade but has to keep people back home happy </li></ul><ul><li>Recruitment </li></ul><ul><li>Lord Kitchener Minister of War </li></ul><ul><li>By end of 1915 the number of volunteers was worrying govt – 1 million in first 6 weeks </li></ul><ul><li>Jan 1916 conscription – all men 18-40 had to register for war </li></ul><ul><li>Conscientious objectors </li></ul><ul><li>White Feather </li></ul><ul><li>Impact on civilians </li></ul><ul><li>From 1914-end of 1916 the food supply was not a major concern </li></ul><ul><li>April 1917 – U boat strike led to a crisis – 6 weeks of food left. Workers went on strike as food prices rose </li></ul><ul><li>May 1917 govt took charge – increased wages, voluntary rationing, allotments, Women Land Army </li></ul><ul><li>Jan 1918 compulsory rationing </li></ul>Big Question:- How was British society changed 1890-1918?

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