Yr10 set1 RandJ 29/2/08
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Yr10 set1 RandJ 29/2/08

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Yr10 set1 RandJ 29/2/08 Yr10 set1 RandJ 29/2/08 Presentation Transcript

  • Objectives:
    • To understand the importance and relevance of the ‘prologue’
    • To further explore Act One Scene One of the play…
  • What does he say? How would you describe his language, and what does this imply about his character? Prince Escales
  • Reading: Lines 97-
  • ROMEO What do we learn about him from the other characters?
  • Adapting the scene:
    • As a director of this hugely important scene (the ‘fight’ section, up to the Prince’s speech), what are your main considerations?
    • What choices might you make as a director?
    • Justify your choices with close reference to the text
  • Example: As the argument escalates, I would start to fill the stage with more members of each household. They would gesture rudely at each other, and would get involved in the fight when it starts. This would help convey how ‘ all consuming’ the “ancient grudge” is, and how the “civil brawls” are continually making “civil hands unclean.”
  • Directing the actors: What do I need to know about my character, and their motivation? How should I deliver my lines here?
  • Example: You are a thoughtful character, and fearful of the law. In This scene you attempt to ‘keep the peace’, and the audience should see you as more level-headed, trying to defuse the violent situation. Your lines should show both fear and also authority over the servants…
  • Directing the actors: What do I need to know about my character, and their motivation? How should I deliver my lines here?
  • Example: You are a fiery, hot-tempered character. The audience needs to immediately see your inclination towards violence, and you should ‘spit out’ the word “peace” as if it is distasteful. Your reference to “hell” should convey the depth of your despise for the Montagues…