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Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results
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Gaining Employee Commitment to Increase Business Results

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Our own Dr. Tom Brooks presented on the topic of employee engagement at a recent event for CEOs. He explored the 10 things that drive employee commitment and increase bottom line results in any …

Our own Dr. Tom Brooks presented on the topic of employee engagement at a recent event for CEOs. He explored the 10 things that drive employee commitment and increase bottom line results in any organization.

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  • 1. Gain Employee Commitmentto Increase Business Results October 2012 Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 1.0b
  • 2. Topics  Make the case for engagement  Discuss drivers of workplace change  Connect workplace change and engagement  Motivators  Who owns responsibility?Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 2
  • 3. What Is Employee Engagement?  Employee is emotionally and intellectually committed to the organization and its goals  When employees care (when they are engaged), they use discretionary effort — they go the extra mileCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 3
  • 4. Emotional and Intellectual Engagement Emotional Engagement Intellectual Engagement  I am proud to tell others that I  I am willing to put in a great deal work for my company of effort beyond what is  The work I have to do is normally expected to help my reasonable company be successful  I am unlikely to look for a job in  I am learning in a manner that another company in the next 12 engages me and enhances my months career options  I understand how my role is  I would recommend my related to my company’s overall company to a close friend as a goals, objectives, and direction good place to work  My job provides me with a  My company inspires me to do sense of personal my best work accomplishmentCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 4
  • 5. Most Employees Are Not Highly Committed How much of your organization is up for grabs? These employees exhibit moderate commitment to their work, teams, managers, and organizations These high performers have a low retention risk; These poor performers and exhibit very strong put in minimal effort emotional and rational and exhibit strong commitment to their jobs, 29% non-commitment to teams, managers, and their organizations, jobs, 20% 27% organizations managers, and teams Leaning Toward Neutral Leaning Toward 13% Disengagement Engagement 11% The “Disaffected” The “Agnostics” The “True Believers” Source: Corporate Leadership Council 2004 Employee Engagement SurveyCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 5
  • 6. Most Employees Are Not Highly Committed You need to move the middle. 29% 20% 27% Leaning Toward Neutral Leaning Toward 13% Disengagement Engagement 11% The “Disaffected” The “Agnostics” The “True Believers” Source: Corporate Leadership Council 2004 Employee Engagement SurveyCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 6
  • 7. Job Brings Out My Most Creative IdeasCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 7
  • 8. Share New Ideas With CustomersCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 8
  • 9. Financial Impact of Engagement Committed employees add to bottom-line results Financial Performance Compared to Total Stock Index 30% 22% 20% 10% 0% Highly Engaged Disengaged -10% -20% -30% -28% -40% Source: Aon Hewitt 2010. Sample size = 2,900 companiesCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 9
  • 10. Engagement Value Chain ENGAGED INCREASE RESULTS EMPLOYEES • Productivity • More sales • Work harder • Service • More satisfied • Work longer • Quality customers • More focus • More profitCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 10
  • 11. Employee Engagement High engagement levels have positive effects Challenge Autonomy Performance Productivity Purpose RetentionCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 11
  • 12. Employee Engagement What drives commitment from your workforce? 1. Knowing that my job is important (no stonecutting) 2. Knowing what’s expected of me (no ambiguity) 3. Recognition that allows me to take pride in my work 4. Being able to use my talents (doing what I do well) 5. Pride in our company’s service/value to customers 6. Someone here (hopefully, my boss) cares about me as a person 7. Someone here cares about my development 8. I have a voice, and my opinion is valued 9. I have what I need to do my job well 10. I get the communication I need to “know what’s going on”Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 12
  • 13. Managerial Actions 1. Knowing that my job is important  No “stonecutting”  Every job is a “10 on a 10”Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 13
  • 14. Managerial Actions 2. Knowing what’s expected of me My picture Your picture Shared IdeasCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 14
  • 15. Clarifying Importance Clear, matching expectations/priorities What does Watch out for “Should” my boss want? Clarify “What and Why”Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 15
  • 16. Managerial Actions 3. Recognition that allows me to take pride in my work  Personal pride — the strongest motivator of high performance  Be clear about what is recognized, why it is recognized, and what it did for the company Good What Better What and Why Best What, Why, and OutcomeCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 16
  • 17. Managerial Actions 4. Being able to use my talents (doing what I do well)  Do you know the “talents” of each of your team members?  Do you take talent information into account when delegating responsibilities?Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 17
  • 18. Managerial Actions 5. Pride in our company’s service/value to customers  Knowing what problems we solve  Knowing the value we add  Knowing how my job enables the aboveCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 18
  • 19. Managerial Actions 6. Someone here (boss) cares about me as a person  Know your people: – Their wishes, hopes, and dreams – Their families – Their wants and needs  Could be as basic as knowing someone’s nameCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 19
  • 20. Managerial Actions 7. Someone here cares about my development  Development discussions?  Do they see a career path?  Growth opportunities?Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 20
  • 21. Managerial Actions 8. I have a voice, and my opinion is valued  Solicit input  Reinforcement input  Feedback on its use Note: Do not ask for input unless you are willing to implement ideas and changes.Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 21
  • 22. Managerial Actions 9. I have the tools I need to do my job wellCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 22
  • 23. Managerial Actions 10. I get the communication I need to “know what’s going on”Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 23
  • 24. The Outcome? “Our research demonstrated that a 5-point improvement in employee attitudes will drive a 1.3- point improvement in customer satisfaction, which in turn will drive a 0.5% improvement in revenue growth. “If we knew nothing about a local store except that employee attitudes had improved by 5 points on our survey scale, we could predict with confidence that if revenue growth in the district as a whole were 5%, revenue growth at this particular store would be 5.5%.” Source: SEARS, 1998 Harvard Business ReviewCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 24
  • 25. Drivers of Workplace Change  Women’s and men’s workplace needs are becoming more similar  Across generations, people want more career-life options  Flattened organizations have eliminated many avenues for advancement and increased mobility  Technology expands how work gets doneCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 25
  • 26. Generational Differences “Every generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.” George Orwell, AuthorCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 26
  • 27. The Career Ladder Is Waning Career customization then nowCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 27
  • 28. Across Generations, People Want More Career-Life Options  Retirement  Ramp up and  When and options pull back where to work  Role  Flexible flexibility hours  Hours vs. pay Boomers Gen X Gen YCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 28
  • 29. Career Mobility Best way to stay marketable is to always be learning  Absence of job security = workers looking for opportunities that are career enhancers  People leave jobs if opportunities to stay relevant and marketable are not there  Each generation has a decreasing sense of career “destinations”Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 29
  • 30. Motivators Is everything you thought you knew about motivating employees wrong?Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 30
  • 31. Pay Enough to Take the Money Topic Off the Table All things considered when someone is already being paid fairly (market value)  $$ incentives decrease effective performance of complex tasks  Overreliance on $$ rewards erodes emotional commitment  $$ encourages self-serving and short-term behavior more than long-term, company- focused achievement  Financial incentives are used in place of dealing directly with equity and performanceCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 31
  • 32. Incentives Have Kryptonite Incentives will be ineffective when the reason people do something is bigger than money . . . and don’t you want people who are in it for more than the money?Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 32
  • 33. Motivation 2.0  Challenge and Mastery – I am learning in a way that prepares me for my next job  Sense of Purpose – What I do matters  Autonomy – Control over when, where, and how I do the job  Flexibility to integrate work and life stages – Ramp up and pull backCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 33
  • 34. Who Is Responsible? “The future has already arrived. It’s just not evenly distributed yet.” William Gibson, AuthorCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 34
  • 35. Individual Responsibilities Ownership, clarity, and action  Know what they want  Know what the organization needs  Take actionCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 35
  • 36. Manager Responsibilities Coaching, relationships, and dialogue  Check their own engagement  Know individual talents  Know what the organization needs  Coach  Create ongoing conversationsCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 36
  • 37. Leader Responsibilities Trust, communication, and culture  Check their own engagement  Consistent words and actions  Over-communicate  Drive results and engagementCopyright © Psychological Associates® 2012 37
  • 38. Thank you! tbrooks@q4solutions.com (314) 725 7771 Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012Copyright © Psychological Associates® 2012

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