A Curriculum for the Future
The New Secondary Curriculum
Steve Keeble
SSAT
Lead Practitioner
North Suffolk
Small Rural
Sec...
Objectives
• A better understanding of issues in small rural schools
surrounding implementation of the new secondary
curri...
Jot down
2 exiting things and
2 challenging things about
implementing curriculum change
for your school
Task
The benefits of rural schools
• A school is an important element of a thriving
village/town
• Children are educated closer...
But………
• a balance has to be struck between:
• the difficulties and increased costs of maintaining a
small school
• Approp...
Context
• Specialism Business and Enterprise with a Rural
Dimension
• Catchment Rural, Acorn says high percentage of wealt...
I want to improve
myself......... I want to
Learn….. I want to see how
good I am...... I want to know
that I am making pro...
Opportunities
• Because of the school’s Business and Enterprise Specialist status,
students have an option to take vocatio...
Barriers to Remove
• Rural families do not have a tradition of going on to post
compulsory education
• Compliant parent bo...
Solutions
• An SLT prepared to take risks!!
• Some “Creative” Timetabling
• Vertical Federations
• Horizontal Federations
...
Preparing to Change…….
• Super rationalist: this is not possible, because this is not the * way
we do things
• Nay Sayers:...
2005
• BLOCK 1:
• Land based studies
• Geography
• ICT
• Applied Business **
• BLOCK 2 :
• Art & Design
• Food Technology
...
2008
• BLOCK 1:
• *Motor Vehicle Studies
• *Building and Construction
• *Land Based Studies
• *Hairdressing
• Art and Desi...
Problem solving, reasoning
and numeracy
Physical
development
Personal, social and
emotional development
Knowledge and
unde...
Drilling Deeper
• Clear and relevant links across subjects and the world beyond
school ensuring coherence and relevance fo...
OfSted’s view
The Common Inspection Framework asks inspectors
to evaluate how well programmes and activities
(which in the...
Ofsted’s expectations of what a school will
do in relation to its curriculum are as
follows:
• ensure that it meets the ne...
18
Managing Change…
VISION + SKILLS + INCENTIVES + RESOURCES + ACTION PLAN = CHANGE
SKILLS + INCENTIVES + RESOURCES + ACTI...
Outcomes
• All Land Based Studies students have gained at least a
pass at Lv2 2005/2008
• Current Year 10 perceptions bein...
Future Plans
• Further expansion of Vocational Curriculum Offer
• The Tardis Effect
• Diplomas
• “Super Blocks” of time fo...
Final Thoughts
• “All education is, in a sense, vocational, vocational for
living” (John Newsom)
• “It's fairly obvious th...
Further information
Useful links
• SSAT www.ssatrust.org.uk/curriculumdesign
• NCSL www.ncsl.org.uk/lnpartnershipevents
• ...
Support
If you want advice or support on any of the issues
discussed today
Phone: 01493660218
Email: sajh@btinternet.com
Finally
Please complete the evaluation sheets.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Rural Schools and Curriculum Change

804

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
804
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • On the Post Its, write 2 exiting things and 2 challenging things about implementing curriculum change for your school
  • Research has shown that the majority of learners want to learn but……
    20% of time in school = no planned learning
    Blackpool example, the majority of students questioned said they only learn in school, not anywhere else.
  • These are our "Fire Hoses". When we have a creative idea, and we want to
    believe in it, our rational side comes in and tries to extinguish our idea. There are three
    main things that we do:
    "Self-doubt": No, nobody will think it's a good idea. I'm probably being really stupid!
    · "Things could be worse": Ah, well the situation is not perfect but it could be worse.
    (Marcus's response, but what if it was a hell of a lot better)
    · "Hedging Bets": I could take the greater risk and lose or take the smaller risk (or no
    risk) and don't gain anything.
  • Personalisation= in the class WYSIWYG which is fine, but what can we do to help you access it
  • Relate the areas in red
  • Relate the areas in red
  • Rural Schools and Curriculum Change

    1. 1. A Curriculum for the Future The New Secondary Curriculum Steve Keeble SSAT Lead Practitioner North Suffolk Small Rural Secondary Schools and Curriculum Change
    2. 2. Objectives • A better understanding of issues in small rural schools surrounding implementation of the new secondary curriculum • A shared understanding of issues of collaboration in rural settings • A better understanding of how we can make the most of the opportunities presented by the new secondary curriculum • Share issues raised by delegates • Use Teacher Voice to feedback to SSAT/QCA
    3. 3. Jot down 2 exiting things and 2 challenging things about implementing curriculum change for your school Task
    4. 4. The benefits of rural schools • A school is an important element of a thriving village/town • Children are educated closer to home and the curriculum can be directly related to the local environment. • There is easy accessibility for parents and teachers alike. • The rural village/town secondary school may also play a key role in the social, as well as educational, life of the community. • It may provide a rich cultural resource for the village and be a focus for a range of activities.
    5. 5. But……… • a balance has to be struck between: • the difficulties and increased costs of maintaining a small school • Appropriate specialist status • The curriculum offer, broad and balanced or specific to the community, i.e. vocational emphasis e.g. land based/engineering with limited staffing • Ability to offer diplomas and multiple lines of learning • the consequences of its closure, particularly in terms of traveling times for students
    6. 6. Context • Specialism Business and Enterprise with a Rural Dimension • Catchment Rural, Acorn says high percentage of wealthy achievers but…. • Feeder Schools 6; Year 6 class sizes 4-16 • NOR 345 • 5+A*-C GCSE Rising Trend (But variance due to small cohort) JVA A*-C= 8/A*-C inc En/Ma= 5 • FE Colleges 45 Minutes travel….few busses • Bussed in? 80% • SEN Statements 17% • School Action/+ 22%
    7. 7. I want to improve myself......... I want to Learn….. I want to see how good I am...... I want to know that I am making progress I want to improve myself......... I want to Learn….. I want to see how good I am...... I want to know that I am making progress I don’t have a clear career path but I know I want a good job and for that I need qualifications. I want to contribute to society and I know the sort of person I want to be. I want my personal growth recognised in some formal ways
    8. 8. Opportunities • Because of the school’s Business and Enterprise Specialist status, students have an option to take vocational courses at key stage 4. • A philanthropic local farmer • Initially an opportunity to offer vocational options in partnership with a local FE provider • From 2008 a new partnership with locality schools • Gives wider exposure to different student cohorts-more opportunity for role model development • More appropriate curriculum for our students • Opportunity to personalise learning through wider curriculum choice • An Innovative Curriculum Model Designed to Meet Learner Needs?
    9. 9. Barriers to Remove • Rural families do not have a tradition of going on to post compulsory education • Compliant parent body • A reluctance among students to be independent learners • Connexions advisors find low career expectations and lack of ambition • With broadened option offer small KS4 class sizes • Expensive • Transport
    10. 10. Solutions • An SLT prepared to take risks!! • Some “Creative” Timetabling • Vertical Federations • Horizontal Federations • Access to funding linked to partnership working • Schools within schools • Flexible environments • Local business partnerships • Integrated locality transport
    11. 11. Preparing to Change……. • Super rationalist: this is not possible, because this is not the * way we do things • Nay Sayers: Yes, but have you thought of this and that, and these, it's just not possible is it! • Passive Resistors: Yes, that's a great idea, yes brilliant.... Have you done something about it: No! • Things will get back...: Don't worry he's got this new idea, go along with it, he will have forgotten next week! • Seasoned Veterans: We tried this in 1937, and it didn't work, so it won't work, sorry. • Bottom Liner: NO, it will never work, no discussion on that. • Yes, ... but: It is a very good idea, BUT have you thought to ...
    12. 12. 2005 • BLOCK 1: • Land based studies • Geography • ICT • Applied Business ** • BLOCK 2 : • Art & Design • Food Technology • Graphics • Resistant Materials • Applied Business** • BLOCK 3: • PE • French • ASDAN • Applied Business** • BLOCK 4: • Expressive Arts (Dance, Drama, Music) • History • ICT • Applied Business**
    13. 13. 2008 • BLOCK 1: • *Motor Vehicle Studies • *Building and Construction • *Land Based Studies • *Hairdressing • Art and Design • Food Technology • Business Studies • BLOCK 2: • *Motor Vehicle Studies • *Building and Construction • *Land Based Studies • *Hairdressing • Spanish • History • ICT • BLOCK 3: • Graphics • PE • Resistant Materials • Music • Life Skills • BLOCK 4: • Business Studies • Geography • French • ASDAN • ICT • Twilight • Customer Service Technical Certificate • GCSE Drama
    14. 14. Problem solving, reasoning and numeracy Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Whole curriculum dimensions Approaches to learning Components Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become Statutory expectations Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. Varied and matched to learning need e.g. enquiry, instruction, active, practical, theoretical Assessment is fit for purpose and integral to learning and teaching Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development In tune with human development Assessment develops learners’ self- esteem and commitment to their learning Personalised - offering challenge and support to enable all learners make progress and achieve Assessment uses a wide range of evidence to encourage learners to reflect on their own learning Involve learners proactively in their own learning Resource well- matched to learning need eg. use of time, space, people, materials Relevant, purposeful and for a range of audiences Environment RoutinesLocationsLessonsLearning outside the classroomEvents Extended hours Evaluating impact Accountability measures To secure The curriculum as an entire planned learning experience underpinned by a broad set of common values and purposes Whole curriculum dimensions Approaches to learning Components Every Child Matters outcomes Focus for learning Curriculum aims Be healthy Stay safe Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic wellbeing Attitudes and attributes eg determined, adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising Knowledge and understanding eg big ideas that shape the world Skills eg literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal, learning and thinking skills Successful learners who enjoy learning, make progress and achieve Responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society Confident individuals who are able to lead safe, healthy and fulfilling lives The curriculum aims to enable all young people to become Statutory expectations Overarching themes that have a significance for individuals and society, and provide relevant learning contexts: Identity and cultural diversity - Healthy lifestyles – Community participation – Enterprise – Global dimension and sustainable development – Technology and the media – Creativity and critical thinking. Varied and matched to learning need eg enquiry, instruction, active, practical, theoretical Assessment is fit for purpose and integral to learning and teaching Opportunities for spiritual, moral, social, cultural, emotional, intellectual and physical development In tune with human development Assessment develops learners’ self- esteem and commitment to their learning Personalised - offering challenge and support to enable all learners to make progress and achieve Assessment uses a wide range of evidence to encourage learners to reflect on their own learning Involve learners proactively in their own learning Resource well matched to learning need eg use of time, space, people, materials Relevant, purposeful and for a range of audiences PSHE PW EW+FC PEMuMFL RE SCMaICTHiGeEnD & TCiA & D Problem solving, reasoning and numeracy Physical development Personal, social and emotional development Knowledge and understanding of the world Communication, language and literacy Creative development Environment RoutinesLocationsLessonsLearning outside the classroomEvents Extended hours Attainment and improved standards Behaviour and attendance Further involvement in education, employment or trainingCivic participation Healthy lifestyle choices Three key questions 3 How well are we achieving our aims? 1 What are we trying to achieve? 2 How do we organise learning? To make learning and teaching more effective so that learners understand quality and how to improve Involves the whole school community eg learners, parents, teachers, employers, governors Chooses assessment fit for purpose Creates a continuous improvement cycle Uses a wide range of measures, both qualitative and quantitative Uses ‘critical friends’ to offer insights and challenge assumptions Uses information intelligently to identify trends and clear goals for improvement Looks at the whole child eg curriculum aims, progress in skills, subjects and dimensions Uses a variety of techniques to collect and analyse information I want to contribute to society and I know the sort of person I want to be. How good am I? What am I like? What do I want to achieve?
    15. 15. Drilling Deeper • Clear and relevant links across subjects and the world beyond school ensuring coherence and relevance for the learner. • The Dimensions provide overarching thematic links – and are themselves interdependent. • The curriculum must be designed to enable personalisation – to value each individual and address her/his needs, aspirations and interests. • Learning must be organised so that time, people and resources are deployed to optimise learners’ progress. • This requires a culture of the recognition of all interests, contributions and successes – not solely academic –drawing on the great potential of your staff • STUDENT VOICE should contribute to the design of the learning process – i.e. curriculum review.
    16. 16. OfSted’s view The Common Inspection Framework asks inspectors to evaluate how well programmes and activities (which in the case of schools is the curriculum) meet the needs and interests of learners. To do this Inspectors evaluate: • the extent to which the curriculum matches learners’ needs • the extent to which the provision contributes to the learners’ personal development and well-being, for example their capacity to stay safe and healthy and their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.
    17. 17. Ofsted’s expectations of what a school will do in relation to its curriculum are as follows: • ensure that it meets the needs of all learners and enables them to achieve high standards • constantly seek to improve the curriculum • ensure that it is relevant to, engages and hopefully inspires all learners • make links where relevant across and between subjects and aspects • allow choice and scope for personalising learning • promote creativity and independent learning
    18. 18. 18 Managing Change… VISION + SKILLS + INCENTIVES + RESOURCES + ACTION PLAN = CHANGE SKILLS + INCENTIVES + RESOURCES + ACTION PLAN = CONFUSION VISION + INCENTIVES + RESOURCES + ACTION PLAN = ANXIETY VISION + SKILLS + RESOURCES + ACTION PLAN = RESISTANCE VISION + SKILLS + INCENTIVES + ACTION PLAN = FRUSTRATION VISION + SKILLS + INCENTIVES + RESOURCES = TREADMILL [Source: 21st Century Learning Journeys: No Time for Hesitancy adapted from T. Knoster, 1991, TASH Conference, Washington DC]
    19. 19. Outcomes • All Land Based Studies students have gained at least a pass at Lv2 2005/2008 • Current Year 10 perceptions being evaluated via video diary as part of a National Applied Learning Survey • Pupils have more opportunities to access vocational courses • Increased opportunities for staff CPD in developing skills in teaching “New” qualifications • Strengthened partnership secures funding • Work in Progress!! •
    20. 20. Future Plans • Further expansion of Vocational Curriculum Offer • The Tardis Effect • Diplomas • “Super Blocks” of time for subjects to collaborate • Core days and Options Days • Redevelopment of the school day • 2 Year KS3 for Maths and Science • Exploring “Opening Minds” or competency curriculum equivalent for Year 7 • Increased number of “Flexi Days”
    21. 21. Final Thoughts • “All education is, in a sense, vocational, vocational for living” (John Newsom) • “It's fairly obvious that American education is a cultural flop. Americans are not a well-educated people culturally, and their vocational education often has to be learned all over again after they leave school and college” (Raymond Chandler) • Vocational education programs have made a real difference in the lives of countless young people nationwide; they build self-confidence and leadership skills by allowing students to utilize their unique gifts and talents.
    22. 22. Further information Useful links • SSAT www.ssatrust.org.uk/curriculumdesign • NCSL www.ncsl.org.uk/lnpartnershipevents • QCA http://curriculum.qca.org.uk/
    23. 23. Support If you want advice or support on any of the issues discussed today Phone: 01493660218 Email: sajh@btinternet.com
    24. 24. Finally Please complete the evaluation sheets.
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×