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Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned
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Session 4 - Implementing Complete Streets: Lessons Learned

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  • This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons license permitting non-commercial use with attribution. Any of these conditions may be waived with permission. For-profit organizations wishing to use this presentation should contact us at bmccann@completestreets.org or 202-234-2745. For more information about this license, please visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/
  • Photo: Davis, CA (Dan Burden, Walkable and Livable Communities Institute, Inc.)
  • Twenty years of consistent investment in a multimodal system has lead to measurable results. These numbers represent commuting to work only, so actual use of these modes in all trips is likely higher. Transit: 10.6% locally, 5.0% nationally; Walking: 8.3% locally, 2.8% nationally; Biking: 9.9% locally, 0.55% nationally Source: 2008 American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau: http://www.census.gov/acs/www/ Image: Boulder, CO artist’s rendition.
  • Photo credit: City of Colorado Springs Excellent example of incremental and low cost approach to “completing streets” – Cheyenne Blvd. Typical old style street 4-lane street, no center turn lane, on-street parking Major E/W corridor from south downtown area (connects with Tejon Street road diet) to southwest neighborhoods and major recreation sites in the foothills - ~ 9,000 ADT (approx. 3 miles long) Older residentially fronted arterial with lots of driveways and side streets – some mixed uses, mix of income Frequent complaints about speeding, on-street parking concerns, aggressive drivers – serves transit, heavily used by bicyclists 2006 resurfacing project = opportunity to change SWITCH TO NEXT SLIDE
  • Photo credit: City of Colorado Springs Excellent example of incremental and low cost approach to “completing streets” – Cheyenne Blvd. Typical old style street 4-lane street, no center turn lane, on-street parking Major E/W corridor from south downtown area (connects with Tejon Street road diet) to southwest neighborhoods and major recreation sites in the foothills - ~ 9,000 ADT (approx. 3 miles long) Older residentially fronted arterial with lots of driveways and side streets – some mixed uses, mix of income Frequent complaints about speeding, on-street parking concerns, aggressive drivers – serves transit, heavily used by bicyclists 2006 resurfacing project = opportunity to change SWITCH TO NEXT SLIDE
  • Photo credit: City of Colorado Springs Converted the street to a 3-land configuration, with bike lanes and on-street parking Very low cost – a little more solid striping and some additional signage for bike lanes Preserved all on-street parking – even added spaces by middle school at west end of corridor 85 th percentile speeds dropped from 41 mph (posted 35) to 38 mph; no diversion of traffic to parallel corridor. Temporary increase to over 13,000 vpd was handled well when parallel corridor was closed for major utility work last year. Supported by most neighbors and very well liked now ; however, there was some initial push back (2 weeks of angry emails, calls, newspaper coverage). ADVICE: Trust your professional judgment and ride it out. NOTE: Cheyenne Blvd is still not “complete” several sections of missing sidewalk, numerous missing transit pads but these are being targeted in near future – good example of incrementalism. Cheyenne Blvd may still be somewhat incomplete but it is much better than before.
  • Photo credit: City of Colorado Springs Converted the street to a 3-land configuration, with bike lanes and on-street parking Very low cost – a little more solid striping and some additional signage for bike lanes Preserved all on-street parking – even added spaces by middle school at west end of corridor 85 th percentile speeds dropped from 41 mph (posted 35) to 38 mph; no diversion of traffic to parallel corridor. Temporary increase to over 13,000 vpd was handled well when parallel corridor was closed for major utility work last year. Supported by most neighbors and very well liked now ; however, there was some initial push back (2 weeks of angry emails, calls, newspaper coverage). ADVICE: Trust your professional judgment and ride it out. NOTE: Cheyenne Blvd is still not “complete” several sections of missing sidewalk, numerous missing transit pads but these are being targeted in near future – good example of incrementalism. Cheyenne Blvd may still be somewhat incomplete but it is much better than before.
  • Dedicated staff needs supportive high-level officials and decision makers. Without that support, their input is marginalized. Going through the process of developing a complete streets policy, educating the elected officials and community – and others in the DOT! – helps give these innovators the political and community cover. It also allows the necessary process of TRYING things and seeing what happens! Pilot projects have been so important in many communities – not only to check their internal data and forecasting, but also as a tool to communicate the vision to doubters, both in the community and among decision makers.
  • 1. Crosswalks and sidewalks near stops and stations are necessities. Every transit trip requires crossing the street. Complete streets connect transit users to their destinations. 2. Buses get stuck in traffic, and their progress is further slowed by the constant need to merge back into the flow of traffic after pulling over to pick up passengers. Stop-and-go bus service discourages use, increasing traffic congestion by those who choose to drive instead. While solutions exist that can help speed service, transit agencies often don’t have much say in tweaking road design for bus use. A complete streets policy enables decision makers to prioritize transit in roadway improvements – making trips faster and more reliable. Photo: (John LaPlante)
  • Photo: Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, apbp.org
  • Transcript

    • 1. Complete Streets Best Practices Barbara McCann
    • 2. Best Practices Manual
      • Today:
      • Change plans & process
      • Tackle design
      • Be an opportunist
      • Measure results
      • Empower planners
    • 3. 4 Implementation steps
      • Changing Procedures
      • Training
      • Re-writing Manuals
      • New Performance measures
    • 4. Change plans & process
      • Successful implementation reaches beyond the initial document to include changes to:
        • procedures
        • Zoning codes
        • Plans
        • Subdivision ordinances
        • Standards
        • Manuals
    • 5.
      • Much of the training
      • needed for successful Complete Streets policies is not in design, but in new procedures.
      Training As of 01/15/10
    • 6. Columbus, Ohio
      • Procedural training sessions for:
        • Zoning staff
        • Public utilities
        • Contractors
        • Consultants
        • Private developers
    • 7. CalTrans Implementation guide
    • 8. Tackling Design Issues
      • Approaches:
        • Rewrite the book
        • Throw out the book
        • Augment the national standards
    • 9. Complete Streets Design Manuals
      • State of Massachusetts Project Development Guide
      • Louisville, Kentucky Complete Streets Manual
      • Charlotte, NC Urban Street Design Guidelines
      • Sacramento Best Practices Guide
    • 10. Throw out the book
      • University Place Washington: charettes for every project
    • 11. Augment National Standards
      • Boulder, CO:
        • Experiment with treatments,
        • tweak standards,
        • Make variances routine
    • 12.
      • Twenty years of consistent investment in a has lead to measurable results in Boulder, CO.
      Boulder Results Transit use is twice the national average. Walking commutes are 3 times the national average. Bicycle commutes are 18 times the national average. 2008 American Community Survey
    • 13. Measure Results Measure outcomes to build support and learn what is working
    • 14. Measure Results
      • Before-after road diet studies:
        • New York
        • Seattle
        • Colorado Springs
        • Charlotte
      • Charlotte: two-hour congestion analysis, multi-modal LOS
      • New York Sustainable Streets measures
      • Redmond Mobility Report Card
    • 15. Redmond Washington http://redmond.gov/connectingredmond/policiesplans/tmpprojectdocs.asp
    • 16. Lesson: Be an Opportunist
      • Be Opportunistic:
        • Assess the needs of all users for every project
        • Take every opportunity to make small improvements
      • Be Incremental:
        • Organize a retrofit program around repaving and rehabilitation
        • Begin to plan ahead for larger ‘fixes’
    • 17. Colorado Springs
    • 18. Cheyenne Blvd. Before Complete Streets through resurfacing: 7-10% of network each year
    • 19. Cheyenne Blvd. After
    • 20. Cheyenne Blvd. After
      • Speed (85 th Percentile)
      • Posted: 35 mph
      • Before: 41 mph
      • After: 36-39 mph
    • 21.
      • Bridging the Gap Levy 2006
      • Complete Streets Ordinance 2007
      Seattle’s systematic approach
    • 22.
      • Internal steering committee
      • Citizen oversight committee
      • Document analysis
      • Cross-departmental project meetings
      • Systematic review for street completion
      Seattle’s systematic approach
    • 23. Seattle’s Incremental approach
      • Retrofitting during repaving projects & signal changes
      • Aligning similar projects to save money
      • Tracking projects that have to wait for more funds
    • 24. Seattle Results
      • Total collisions:  12%
      • 2006 - 18,676
      • 2008 - 16,458
      • Fatalities  50%
      • Serious injuries  31%
      • 2006 - 357
      • 2008 - 246
    • 25. Lessons in Cost Concerns
      • Seem to fade once policy is adopted
      • Are mitigated by:
        • Opportunism
        • Incrementalism
        • Avoiding retrofit costs
      • Projects provide high value
      • Many strategies are inexpensive
    • 26. Lesson: Inside Advocacy
      • An advocate inside the agency can make all the difference to successful policy implementation, especially in the early stages
    • 27. Lesson: Empowerment Local policies are successful when they empower planners and engineers to think through creative approaches.
    • 28.  
    • 29. New York City Results 225 new miles of bike lanes, doubled since 2006 Bike Fatalities  54 % from 2008
    • 30.
      • Resistance fades with success.
      Final Lessons
    • 31. Available from:
      • www.planning.org
      • www.completestreets.org
    • 32.
      • Full-day, interactive, customized workshops with two nationally-known instructors
      • Engages planners, engineers, elected officials, community stakeholders, and other decision makers
      • Three types of workshops:
      • Laying the Foundation for Complete Streets
      • Complete Streets Policy Development
      • Complete Streets Policy Implementation
      Complete Streets Workshops For details, contact Linda Tracy at linda@apbp.org
    • 33.
      • For more information:
      • www.completestreets.org
      Illustration: AARP Bulletin

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