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  • From Texas Drove to School Walked to the store and pulled over by police to see what was wrong and if I needed a ride Taught to bike in college. Told not to bike in the rain. Started bike commuting in New York City. Worked with Safe Routes for 3 years now.
  • Education and advocacy
  • How many of you are interested in teaching or having someone else teach a bike safety curriculum at a school? Would you like me to spend more time presenting, or do it quickly and have time to talk about ideas/barriers/how to solve problems and first steps.
  • As much as 26% of morning traffic is school related. (Imagine that you are all vehicles on the road, ¼ of you are taking kids to school) Passenger vehicles account for 62% of traffic green-house gas emissions. 61% of children 9-13 years do not participate in any physical activity during non-school hours. (My sister has 5 kids, that means 3 of those 5 are not getting any exercise, which 3 would you pick). In one generation the percentage of kids who walk or bike to school has dropped from 50% to 15% and Childhood obesity has tripled. Distance and Traffic Danger are the top 2 barriers.
  • We ask the kids why they love biking during one of the lessons and one of the most popular answers is “the wind.”
  • Teaching 4th-7th graders the bike-safety basics using Safe Routes for Kids , a 10 hour curriculum of in-class and on-street lessons during the school day. Lessons include: Stopping with both brakes Turning left and right Looking back for traffic Following the laws Wearing a helmet Practicing right of way  
  • These lessons are geared toward having one instructor and the classroom teacher present. Many of the lessons in the curriculum are geared toward using a classroom teacher or phys ed teacher and several volunteers. These drills have been modified to fit our level of adult participation.
  • Lesson 1: Introduction Objectives: Students learn the importance of biking safely, understand the health and environmental benefits of biking, view a 20-minute video about bike safety (First Gear), and define visible, predictable, and legal cycling. Lesson 2: Helmet fitting Objectives: Students learn how to and demonstrate the ability to properly fit a bicycle helmet and understand the importance of wearing a helmet while cycling.   Lesson 3: Bike fitting Objectives: Students learn how to properly fit a bicycle, understand and demonstrate the ability to check major components of a bike to make sure it is safe to ride, and understand and demonstrate the ability to properly outfit themselves to be ready to ride a bicycle. Drills: Ride with Ghost Rider Space (leaving a bike length between you and the person in front of your while riding single file). Lesson 4: Rules of the Road and Stopping Objectives: Students define intersection, discuss rules of the road and how they apply to cycling, learn the lane positions and understand their use, understand and demonstrate stopping using both brakes, understand the basics of shifting gears, and demonstrate the ability to only shift when pedaling. Drills:  See “DAY 4 COURSE” Lesson 5: Turning left and right at a simulated intersection. Objectives: Students demonstrate how to properly use lane positions to turn left and right, understand and demonstrate the ability to look back before moving into the lane, understand and demonstrate the proper use of hand signals. Drills: Shoulder-Check, and see “DAY 5 COURSE” Lesson 6: Turning left and right using a low traffic intersection. Objectives: Students define right of way, learn the three rules of right of way, understand the dangers of riding with traffic and the importance of making safe decisions, demonstrate the ability to safely and legally turn left and right at an intersection using lane positions. Drills: See “DAY 6 COURSE”
  • Lesson 7: Right of way at a 3-way intersection Objectives: Students demonstrate understanding of the rules of right of way, understand and demonstrate how to make a safe decision at an intersection using his/her own judgment, demonstrate the ability to safely and legally turn left and right at an intersection using lane positions. Drills: See “DAY 7 AND 8 COURSE” Lesson 8: Right of way at a 4-way intersection Objectives: Students define road hazard, understand how to safely avoid road hazards, demonstrate understanding of the rules of right of way, understand and demonstrate how to make a safe decision at an intersection using his/her own judgment, demonstrate the ability to legally turn left and right at an intersection using lane positions. Drills: See “DAY 7 AND 8 COURSE” Lesson 9: Review Objectives: Students understand all material presented in Lessons 1-8, demonstrate the ability to ride safely with traffic following the rules of the road and using lane positions. Drills: See “DAY 7 AND 8 COURSE” Lesson 10: Community Ride Objective: Students safely complete a group ride in the neighborhood following all rules of the road.  Students experience some benefits of cycling. Drills: 1-hour bike ride through the community.
  • I picked lesson 5 because it still includes many of the very basic skills. The curriculum is a series of levels to the pyramid, gear is first, laws/ hand signals are next, where to ride in the road follows, and then how to interact with other road users and practice is the icing on the cake (or pyramid… choose you analogy) . Lesson 5 is still working on the basics, and since I am going to teach you all this lesson, it’s a great one. So transform into 5th graders, we’re going to learn how to navigate an intersection.
  • During one communtity ride the students were pretending to be a musical show going on the road performing the ever popular musical sensational hit, Shoulder check signal, move to position one.
  • • Students rode by a group of people during their community ride who asked, “What is this? Why aren’t you in school” to which a student replied, “This is school!” • On one community ride, the weather was unusual to say the least with sun, strong winds, rain, and hail. At one point when the hail and wind were particularly bad and there was no cover, the group had to stop and face away from the wind to protect the students' faces. A student yelled, “This is another reason to wear a helmet. It keeps us safe from hail!” • While riding in the bike lane on Holgate, one student proclaimed, “This is OUR lane!” On one ride, many students rode on a tour of their neighborhoods for the first time. Shouts of “I didn’t know this was here!” could be heard along the single file line of students. • A student attended class wearing kneepads and shoulder pads . He learned to ride that day.
  • The BTA started teaching in a couple of schools in 1998.  In the 2009-2010 school year, the BTA taught in: 40 Portland Schools: Funded by Portland Bureau of Transportation's Safe Routes to School Program 5 Albany Schools: Mostly funded through individual and business donations, partial ODOT funding 6 Ashland Schools: Some Ashland Parks and Rec funding and some ODOT funding 7 Corvallis Schools: ODOT funding and Local Bike Club donations 2 Eugene Schools: Some local grants, Business donations, and ODOT funds 4 Salem Schools: Local Bike Club donations and ODOT funds
  • 1. Support from Principal/District Start small.  Go for the low hanging fruit. 2. Funding Local, State, Federal Grants; Fee for service; Individual/ Business Donors 3. Bike Fleet, Tools, Maintenance, and Storage Six 20-inch wheel bikes; Twenty 24-inch wheel bikes; Seven 26-inch wheel bikes. 4. Excited, Knowledgeable Teachers Either teach classroom/PE teachers to bike safely or teach a bike safety expert lessons in classroom management!
  • For more information about the BTA's Safe Routes to School Curriculum, contact: LeeAnne Fergason, leeanne@bta4bikes.org, 503-226-0676x26 You can order your own copy by visiting www.bta4bike.org.

Safe routesforkids Safe routesforkids Presentation Transcript

  • LeeAnne Fergason Bicycle Transportation Alliance [email_address] Twitter @BTAOregon Facebook.com/BTAOregon
  • BTA Mission To create healthy, sustainable communities by making bicycling safe, convenient, and accessible. BTA Vision Bicycling transforms communities by reinventing transportation and offering solutions to the universal challenges to health, livability, and the environment.
  • Safe Routes for Kids The Bicycle Transportation Alliance's Bike Safety Education Program
  • Presentation Outline
    • Why teach bike safety?
    • 10 Lesson Outline
    • Sample Lesson
    • Schools and funding
    • How do I get started?
  • Why teach Bike Safety? 
      • 26%
      • 62%
      • 61%
      • 50% to 15%
      • Tripled
      • Top 2 barriers
    An investment in Bike Safety Education is an investment in our future and...
  • ...and it is awesome.
  • BTA's Bike Safety Education  Program Overview
    • Safe Routes for Kids is a 10 hour curriculum.
    •  
      • Stopping
      • Turning
      • Looking back for traffic
      • Laws
      • Helmet use
      • Right of way
    •  
  • 10 Lessons: Lesson 1: Introduction Lesson 2: Helmet fitting Lesson 3: Bike fitting Lesson 4: Rules of the Road and Stopping Lesson 5: Turning left and right at a simulated intersection. Lesson 6: Turning left and right using a low traffic intersection. Lesson 7: Right of way at a 3-way intersection Lesson 8: Right of way at a 4-way intersection Lesson 9: Review Lesson 10: Community Ride
  • D R I L L S
  • M O R E D R I L L S
  • Sample: Lesson 5 Intersections: Straight, Right, and Left
  • Lesson 5:Hand Signals
  • Lesson 5: Lane Positions         3
  • Lesson 5: Lane Positions      2   3
  • Lesson 5: Lane Positions 1   2   3
  • 1   2   3 Lesson 5: Starting Position
  • 1   2   3 Lesson 5: Going Straight
  • 1   2   3         3 Lesson 5: Going Straight
  • 1   2   3 Lesson 5: Turning Right
  • 1   2   3         3 Lesson 5: Turning Right
  • 1   2   3 Lesson 5: Turning Left
  • 1   2   3 Lesson 5: Turning Left "Shoulder Check, Signal, Move to Position 1"
  • 1   2   3         3 Lesson 5: Turning Left
  • Favorite Outtakes from Bike Safety Class
    • • “ This is school!”
    • • “ This is another reason to wear a helmet. It keeps us safe from hail!”
    • • “ This is OUR lane!”
    • “ I didn’t know this was here!”
    • • kneepads and shoulder pads
  • Schools and Funding
    • The BTA started teaching in a couple of schools in 1998. 
    • In the 2009-2010 school year, the BTA taught in:
      • 40 Portland Schools
      • 5 Albany Schools
      • 6 Ashland Schools
      • 7 Corvallis Schools
      • 2 Eugene Schools
      • 4 Salem Schools
    Total:  64 schools; 4,000 students yearly; many funding sources
  • How do I get started? 1. Support from Principal/District 2. Funding 3. Bike Fleet, Tools, Maintenance, and Storage 4. Excited, Knowledgeable Teachers
  • Thank you! LeeAnne Fergason, leeanne@bta4bikes.org 503-226-0676x26 www.bta4bike.org