Session 6 - Bike Boxes in San Francisco
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Session 6 - Bike Boxes in San Francisco

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Thinking Inside the Box: Best Practies on an Innovation to Improve Traffic Intersections

Thinking Inside the Box: Best Practies on an Innovation to Improve Traffic Intersections

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  • 1. Bike Boxes in San Francisco ProWalk/ProBike 9 | 14 | 2010 | Chattanooga, TN
  • 2. San Francisco in Context • 2nd highest population density in the U.S. • 47 square miles • Mild climate • Population ~ 815,000 • Hilly (steepest hill 31.5%)
  • 3. Bike Network in 2012 Increase to 79 miles (126 km) of bike lanes Increase to 98 miles (157 km) of streets with sharrows Downtown
  • 4. Cycling Volumes in San Francisco 53% increase in cycling between 2006-2009
  • 5. Ultimate Goal – A Positive Feedback Loop More bike More demand facilities (to accommodate bikes) MORE CYCLISTS More awareness Increase of cyclists safety
  • 6. San Francisco Practice • Current Use – Help cyclists merge to left-side of road • Bike Box Design – Limit line (24” wide, 6’- 12’ before crosswalk) – Bicycle symbol – “No Turn on Red” at signalized intersections – “Stop Here on Red, Except Bicycles”
  • 7. Scott Bike Box Celebration
  • 8. Scott-Oak Bike Box • Help cyclists enter the left-turn only bike lane • Scott Street – 2 lane, two-way street with bike lane – Bike left-turn only lane onto Fell Street bike lane
  • 9. Scott/Oak Bike Box: Timeline • May 2006 • Northbound bike lane and bike box installed • December 2009 • Bike box painted green (no bike symbol) and left-turn bike lane added north of the intersection • December 31st, 2009 • Bike symbol added back
  • 10. Scott/Oak Bike Box: Data Collection • December 2009 (green but without bike symbol) • 4 hours observing the evening peak • February 2010 (green with bike symbol) • 3 hours observing the evening peak • Observations • Vehicles – total stopped, stopping location (in bike box, behind advanced stop bar) • Bikes – total stopped, stopping location (bike box, crosswalk, bike lane)
  • 11. Scott/Oak Bike Box: Findings Green “Bike Box” Green Bike Box w/ w/o Bike Symbol Bike Symbol (December ‘09) (February ‘10) Vehicle 50% 38% encroachment (n=116) (n=119) Bike stop Bike box 55% 61% location Crosswalk 30% 25% Bike lane 15% 14% (n=276) (n=350) • Use of bike box improved with installation of bike symbol • Some cars still encroach in the bike box • Some bikes still stopping in crosswalk
  • 12. 14th Street Bike Box • Facilitates bike left turns from a one-way street to an intersecting bike route • 14th Street – 2 lane, one-way street with bike lane – Cars make double left turn from 14th • Folsom Street – 4 lane, two-way street with bike lane
  • 13. 14th/ Folsom Bike Box: Data Collection • Timeline: • December 2004 - bike lane installed • March 2005 - bike box installed • Observations: • September 2010 • 4 hours in each peak period (~240 cycles per peak) • Vehicles – total stopped, stopping location (in bike box, behind advanced stop bar) • Bikes – total stopped, stopping location (bike box, crosswalk, bike lane)
  • 14. 14th/Folsom Bike Box: Findings • 65% of the stopped bikes were turning left Bike Box w/ Bike Symbol (September ‘10) Vehicle encroachment 49% (n=450) Bike stop location (left- Bike box 34% turning bikes) Crosswalk 15% Bike lane 15% Vehicle lane + 36% ped xing (n=185)
  • 15. 14th/Folsom Bike Box: Findings Other observations: • Many cyclists take advantage of a ped head start • Some cyclists simply merged with traffic • Conflicts persisted with right-turning cars Conclusions: • Bike box helps position bicyclists properly for left turns • Some cars still encroaching in the bike box • Some bikes still encroaching in crosswalk • Need more work to discourage right on red
  • 16. Synthesis 14th Street 14th Street – Scott St – Scott St – – Advanced Advanced Advanced Advanced stop bar stop bar + stop bar + stop bar + Bike green green + bike symbol symbol Vehicle 55% 49% 50% 38% encroachment • Vehicle compliance with advanced stop bar was highest with green paint and the bike symbol
  • 17. State Route 227 in San Luis Obispo
  • 18. Existing Intersection
  • 19. Proposed Bike Box
  • 20. Community Feedback • Overwhelming support from local bike advocacy groups and City of San Luis Obispo • Overwhelming support from other advocacy groups across the state and nation • Support from several other California cities including Santa Rosa, Long Beach, San Francisco
  • 21. Issues • High auto volume creates need for refuge area for cyclists • No standard on bike boxes in CA MUTCD • Experimental bike boxes in several CA cities has created a need to codify bike box standards to lessen confusion for road users • Can there be separate stop lines for different road users (motorists, cyclists)?
  • 22. Response from California Traffic Control Devices Committee • Request to experiment denied by CTCDC – Intersection has “non-typical” design configuration due to refuge island – Should consider a different intersection for experimentation • Caltrans instructed to apply to FHWA first and then return to the CTCDC
  • 23. Next Steps in San Francisco • Follow-up work to improve effectiveness of bike boxes • Engineering modifications • Enforcement of no right on red • Education of drivers and cyclists • Synthesize evaluation methodology • Identify additional pilot locations • Monitor performance under various operating conditions • Finalize design guidelines on the use of bike boxes • Support efforts to adopt bike box standards in California
  • 24. Questions? Contact information: Jessica Manzi Project Development SFMTA-Livable Streets jessica.manzi@sfmta.com (415)701-4548 Adam Fukushima, Bike Coordinator Caltrans – District 5 (805) 549-3131 Adam.fukushima@dot.ca.gov