Brands and Values - Changing Places or Learning to Tango?

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Mike Aiken and Philip Holden on the strange relationship between brands and values for non-profit organisations.
Presentation to 6th International Colloquium on Nonprofit, Social and Arts Marketing, London, September 2007

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  • Mike – long familiarity with social actors who spoke of and acted according to ‘values’ ~ but noted some social enterprises in particular paid attention to branding Phil – long familiarity with marketing organisations that aspired to powerful brands ~ but noted that some voluntary sector organisations were ambivalent about branding A need for exploring the ‘leaky boundaries’ between sectors.
  • Brands and Values - Changing Places or Learning to Tango?

    1. 1. Changing places or learning to tango? Values and brands in transition in the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors Mike Aiken & Philip Holden 6 th International Colloquium on Nonprofit, Social and Arts Marketing, London, September 2007
    2. 2. What is the real difference between… <ul><li>Not-for-profit organisations? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ many of these organisations exist in order to express and promote particular values” (Paton with Edwards, 1995) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>For-profit organisations? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ In the most developed role, brands become a synonym of the company’s policy to take larger responsibilities regarding economic values, social commitment, cultural awareness and political issues” (de Chernatony & McDonald, 1998) </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Convergence <ul><ul><li>Increasing emphasis in NFPs on the brand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing emphasis in FPs on values </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. A theoretical perspective <ul><li>Bourdieu, field theory and a relational analysis of objects within fields. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accumulation of capital is significant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Capital may be economic, symbolic, cultural, social etc </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Objects in the field (individuals or organisations) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘Struggle’ for legitimacy </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Visualising a sector as a field + - For profit ‘field’
    6. 6. Mapping two sectors + - + - For profit ‘field’ Not for profit ‘field’
    7. 7. Mapping two sectors + - + - For profit ‘field’ Not for profit ‘field’ ‘ force’ of ‘values’ ‘ force’ of ‘branding’
    8. 8. Mapping two sectors + -
    9. 9. Examples Organisational forms Private sector Public sector Third sector (The six organisations marked with a * are described in Aiken, 2007) A4E CARP* Reed in Partnership Work Directions UK* Work Solutions* Tomorrow’s People* Steps to Work* Necta INclude* Chase, Factory, HCWW
    10. 10. Examples <ul><li>A fathers’ rights group </li></ul><ul><li>Objectives to change public debate/opinion </li></ul><ul><li>A loose association with a limited company for trading </li></ul><ul><li>Focused almost entirely on communication activities </li></ul><ul><li>Income primarily from donations </li></ul><ul><li>Very strong brand </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to be a direct action, campaign group </li></ul><ul><li>Despite a strong advocacy role, no membership </li></ul><ul><li>A fathers’/parenting group </li></ul><ul><li>Objectives to change public debate/opinion </li></ul><ul><li>A registered charity </li></ul><ul><li>Focused almost entirely on communication activities </li></ul><ul><li>Income entirely from government </li></ul><ul><li>Relatively weak brand </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Designed’ to not look like a charity </li></ul><ul><li>Conscious SE model, no membership </li></ul>
    11. 11. Conclusions <ul><li>The concepts of ‘branding’ and ‘values’ are in transition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not static definitions, but dynamic process </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Relational analysis suggests </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Branding and values have symbolic currency which varies with the ‘field’ effect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>They are part of conflicting, but increasingly merging ideologies </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>These interact with other capitals and the habitus of actors and organisations </li></ul></ul>

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