Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Cy 241-assignment03
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Cy 241-assignment03

85
views

Published on

This document describes about recent progress in bringing down the cost of Hydrogen fuel cells. Around 3 papers were summarised and all of them belong to a timespan of 2012-2013.

This document describes about recent progress in bringing down the cost of Hydrogen fuel cells. Around 3 papers were summarised and all of them belong to a timespan of 2012-2013.

Published in: Technology, Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
85
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Nano catalysts Hydrogen Fuel cells Team Neeraj Kumar (B10024) Vihari Piratla (B10025) Submitted as a part of assignment for the course of CY­241 Autumn semester 2013
  • 2. Introduction:                       Hydrogen fuel cells can be an efficient and alternate source of power, as some of the variants of hydrogen fuel cells doesn’t produce green­house gases. The energy efficiency of a fuel cell is generally between 40–60%, or up to 85% efficient if waste heat is captured for use. Hydrogen is a most common fuel for its source is abundant.                       Though Hydrogen fuel cells are efficient and lucrative sources of energy, much of the capability is untapped for cost reasons. 40% of the cost of the Hydrogen fuel cell(HFC) is because of the Platinum(Pt) cathode catalysts and the other reason stems from the intolerance of catalyst towards Carbon­Monoxide(CO). It is observed that CO concentration so low as few 10’s or 100’s of ppm can poisson the catalyst by reducing the active sites and hence reducing the catalytic capacity and efficiency. This intolerance of catalyst towards CO renders common way of hydrogen production through steam reforming of light useless as it contains CO to 1­3%, hence forcing one to produce hydrogen by electrolysis of water. Because of the high cost of HFC’s they are not yet successful in replacing IC engines.                       The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that platinum­based catalysts will need to use roughly four times less platinum than is used in current PEM fuel cell designs in order to represent a realistic alternative to internal combustion engines.[1] Research is being carried out with the following goals: 1. To increase the efficacy of the catalyst, the catalysts efficiency should be increased at least 4 times to be able to replace IC engines. 2. To make it more tolerant to impurities like CO, even CO in ppm amount can poisson the catalyst and render the catalyst useless. Generally high temperature Fuel cells are used to avoid the catalyst poisoning(one of the variants of Fuel cells). 3. To design a metal free catalyst model that can be easily synthesised, with alloys or composites that are copiously available, tolerant to CO poisonous and less degrading with usage. While these are some of the factors that stood as impediments, the research area has seen some game changers.                        Some game changers being  nano technology and other nano imaging techniques these help in better and more control over synthesis of defect less and desired amalgamate of the various elements. Also better imaging techniques mean that one can observe the adsorption and surface absorptions better and this can help in better synthesis of the heterogeneous Hydrogen has a high energy density and is a great energy carrier, Schaak said, but it requires energy to produce. To make its production practical, scientists have been searching for a way to trigger the required chemical reactions with an inexpensive catalyst. 1. Since then there has been a lot of research for a non metallic alternate to Pt and also ways to 1. increase active sites in the catalyst either by occluding the Pt atoms on a nano material. 2. Pt occlusions on other metals/elements to make it more CO tolerant.
  • 3. 3. Good amount of research also on testifying structures like Carbon nano tubes, edge halogenated graphene nano platelets, nickel phosphide nano structures and were also found. We shall discuss some very recent research efforts in this direction. Research details Ru–Pt core–shell nano­particle: This section constitutes the summary of [2].                    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory ­­ in research published online September 18, 2013 in the journal Nature Communications ­have created a high­performing nanocatalyst that solves to a good extent the problems of high cost/rarity of Pt and poisoning of Pt catalyst upon exposure to CO. The novel core­shell structure ­­ ruthenium coated with platinum ­­ resists damage from carbon monoxide and also reduces the Pt consumption by 98%. In specific the paper also talks about the trade­offs between various amalgamation types of Pt with Ru/Ir/Rh/Pd/Au. Alloy core­shell and linked mono­metallic nano particle structures were considered. It was also concluded that core­shell structures of Ru­Pt has the best efficiency both in terms of cost and active sites. The paper attributes that recent advances in surface science techniques, analytical instrumentation and first­principles calculations provide mechanistic insight into the atomistic surface chemistry governing the catalytic activity and over the groundwork for true rational design of heterogeneous catalysts. Throughout this research STEM images enhanced with Density Functional Theory(DFT) were used to characterise and observe histogram of particle sizes in various heterogeneous structures.The carbon monoxide impurities in hydrogen formed from natural gas present another challenge to scientists because they deactivate most platinum catalysts. Ruthenium ­­ less expensive than platinum ­­ promotes carbon monoxide tolerance, but is more prone to dissolution during fuel cells' startup/shutdowns, causing gradual performance decay.                      It was observed that loss of ruthenium on start/shutdown is because of defect mediated interlayer diffusion and can be avoided by eliminating lattice defects from ruthenium particles before adding Pt. In conclusion this method claims a new nano­perfect Ru@Pt structure that is CO poisoning tolerant and uses 98% less platinum, they also claim that the manufacturing process is effortless and scalable and function just as well as platinum at room temperature. Figure 1 shows the effectiveness of various bimetallic structure with respect to temperature and also observe the comparison with Pt, which does not trigger into action until 170 degrees.
  • 4.  Figure­1: TPRresultsforthedifferentPt–RucatalystsshowingH2OformationversustemperatureforH2 feeds contaminated by 0.1% CO by volume. The H2 O yields are plotted as % maximum formation based on the limiting reactant O2 . With complete CO conversion in the 0.1% CO feed, the maximum formation of water is 90%. The monometallic Pt remains in the baseline in this temperature range and does not light off until 170 C. Figure­2: A schematic representation of synthesis of XGnP’s. Figure­3 Facile, scalable synthesis of edge­halogenated graphene nanoplatelets as efficient metal­free eletrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction: This section summarises [3]. This paper published in June 2013, proposes edge halogenated graphene nano­platelets as a replacement for Pt crystals and also claims that this replacement has good tolerance towards methanol
  • 5. crossover/CO poisoning effects and long term cycle stability. It is also implied that the catalyst in itself is much cheaper because of easy synthesis and also pervasive nature of primary elements.                  Hetro atom or covalently bonded atoms can better function in Oxygen Reduction reaction(ORR). The difference in electronegativity (x) between the heteroatom dopants (B = 2.04, I = 2.66, N = 3.04, P = 2.19 and S = 2.58) and carbon atom (2.55) in covalently doped graphitic carbon frameworks can polarize adjacent carbon atoms. Indeed, quantum mechanics calculations revealed that the electron accepting/donating ability of the heteroatom dopants created net positive/negative charges on adjacent carbon atoms in graphitic lattice to facilitate the oxygen reduction process. Thus, both the vertically­aligned nitrogen­doped carbon nanotubes (VA­NCNTs) and nitrogen­doped graphene (N­graphene) catalyzed an efficient four­electron ORR process with a higher electrocatalytic activity and better operation stability than the commercially available Pt/C­based electrocatalyst (Pt: 20 wt%, Vulcan XC­72R). Many of these were untapped because of their intricate synthesis processes and here in this paper authors propose a very simple and scalable synthesis that is ball milling of graphite with halogen. Figure 2 shows and summarises the synthesis step. The order of Electro­catalysis observed was IGnP>BrIGnP>ClGnP, where XGnP is X halogenated grapheme nano platelets.                 In a test of durability, electrodes coated with XGnP's maintained 85.6 to 87.4 percent of their initial current after 10,000 cycles while platinum electrodes maintained only 62.5 percent. The performance of graphene based catalysts was unaffected with induction of CO impurity with Hydrogen fuel. When methanol was added to replicate methanol crossover from the anode to cathode in direct methanol fuel cells, the current density of the platinum catalyst dropped sharply. Again, the graphene­based catalysts were unaffected. Also in comparison with the Pt/C commercially available catalyst: a cathode coated with iodine­edged nanoplatelets performed best. A cathode coated with bromine­edged nanoparticles generated 7 percent less current than the commercial cathode coated with platinum, the chlorine­edged nanoplatelets 40 percent less.              In conclusion, a metal­free easy to synthesise and easily available catalyst was developed and tested to be better than Pt/C and more robust than Pt/C. Though the authors state that they have to further optimise the nano­catalyst, the scope of commercialisation is very high. Electro­catalyst based on carbon nanotubes­graphene complexes This section summarises [4].                Although this paper doesn't aim at commercially replacing Pt/C, it obviates some misconceptions and also proposes a new nano catalyst based on carbon nano­tubes whose catalytic activity is close to platinum and thus considered relevant.               For the study, the Stanford team used multi­walled carbon nanotubes consisting of two or three concentric tubes nested together. The scientists showed that shredding the outer wall, while leaving the inner walls intact, enhances catalytic activity in nanotubes, yet does not interfere with their ability to conduct electricity. A typical carbon nanotube has few defects. "But defects are actually important to promote the formation of catalytic sites and to render the nanotube very active for catalytic reactions.              The multi­walled carbon nano­tube is treated to unzip outer wall and is as depicted in
  • 6. figure­3. Authors claim that though the outer wall is unzipped the conductivity remains intact because of the inner wall and hence can help in charge mobility. The research also concluded that metal impurities play a major role in the catalysis and can't be ignored. NanoPhosphide based nano catalysts This section constitutes information from [5].              According to a team lead by Chemistry professor in Penn state University and patent filed, NickelPhosphide nano particles in solution has produced current at a greater efficacy than Pt/C counter­part. This was possible because of very high surface area in nano­particles and increased number of active sites.              Though it is implied that it will be lot cheaper than Pt/C, it is unknown the effect of impurities in Hydrogen source on the catalyst. It is also unknown the durability of the catalyst. The research group states their future goal as to further improve the performance of these nanoparticles and to understand what makes them function the way they do. Summary:              We are evidencing a revolution in the research of nano catalysts with the advent of Nano­science and nano imaging techniques like STEM. Nanocatalysts have a larger scope in catalysis because of increased surface area, possibility of producing defect free and hence very conductive. Also because of the enhanced imaging techniques, the pioneers are able to observe the factors that influence the active sites and catalytic abilities and thus leading to better catalysts like NickelPhosphide.             We have seen metal­free catalysts that can function just as well as Pt/C and also have seen modification to Pt catalysts to nano­catalysts to improve the robustness and alleviate cost.             We feel that the results that were presented here suffices for large scale commercialisation of Hydrogen Fuel cells. These fuel cells can be much cheaper because of the reduced catalyst cost which constitutes 40% and also reduced cost of hydrogen fuel because of the relaxed constraint of CO poisoning. The day when HFC's replace IC engines is near and can be one stop solution for depriving sources of oils and green­house gases. We feel the only possible piece of puzzle that needs to be solved is efficient(Volume/weight ratio) and safe storage of Hydrogen. References: 1. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi­Year Research Development and Demonstration Plan, U.S. Department of Energy, October 2007 2. Yu­Chi Hsieh, Yu Zhang, Dong Su, Vyacheslav Volkov, Rui    Si, Lijun Wu, Yimei Zhu, Wei An, Ping Liu, Ping He, Siyu Ye, Radoslav R. Adzic & Jia X Wang (2013) Ordered bilayer ruthenium–platinum core­shell nanoparticles as carbon monoxide­tolerant fuel cell catalysts. Nature Communications 4, Article number: 2466 doi: 10.1038/ncomms3466 3. Jeon, I., Choi, H., Choi, M., Seo, J., Jung, S., Kim, M., Zhang, S., Zhang, L., Xia, Z., Dai, L. and Others. 2013. Facile, scalable synthesis of edge­halogenated graphene nanoplatelets as efficient metal­free eletrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.
  • 7. Scientific reports, 3. 4. Li, Y., Zhou, W., Wang, H., Xie, L., Liang, Y., Wei, F., Idrobo, J., Pennycook, S. and Dai, H. 2012. An oxygen reduction electrocatalyst based on carbon nanotube­graphene complexes. Nature nanotechnology, 7 (6), pp. 394­­400. 5. Theengineer.co.uk. 2013. Nano­catalyst could aid hydrogen production | News | The Engineer. [online] Available at: http://www.theengineer.co.uk/energy­and­environment/news/nano­catalyst­could­aid­hyd rogen­production/1016531.article [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013]. External Links: 1. Batteries, '. 2012. 'Unzipped' carbon nanotubes could help energize fuel cells and batteries. [online] Available at: http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=25388.php [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013]. 2. Diolazo, J. 2013. New nanocatalyst for hydrogen production developed at Brookhaven. [online] Available at: http://www.ecoseed.org/renewables/hydrogen­fuel­cells/17082­new­nanocatalyst­for­hyd rogen­production­developed­at­brookhaven [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013]. 3. Hamilton, T. 2013. Nanocrystal Catalyst Transforms Impure Hydrogen into Electricity. [online] Available at: http://scicasts.com/green­biology/1865­green­nanotechnology/6631­nanocrystal­catalyst­ transforms­impure­hydrogen­into­electricity [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013]. 4. Media, B. 2013. Green Car Congress: New core­shell bi­layer nanocatalyst tolerant to CO; potential for low­temperature fuel cells with reformates. [online] Available at: http://www.greencarcongress.com/2013/09/20130921­bnl.html [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013]. 5. MIT Technology Review. 2013. A Cheaper Hydrogen Catalyst | MIT Technology Review. [online] Available at: http://www.technologyreview.com/news/416520/a­cheaper­hydrogen­catalyst/ [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013]. 6. Newscientist.com. 2013. Platinum­free fuel cell promises cheap, green power ­ tech ­ 15 December 2008 ­ New Scientist. [online] Available at: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16275­platinumfree­fuel­cell­promises­cheap­gree n­power.html#.UnzXdpQY3mQ [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013]. 7. ScienceDaily. 2013. Metal­free catalyst outperforms platinum in fuel cell. [online] Available at: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605111518.htm
  • 8. [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013]. 8. Wikipedia. 2013. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell. [online] Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_exchange_membrane_fuel_cell#cite_note­5 [Accessed: 9 Nov 2013].

×