LEARNING ABOUT QUESTIONING Materials from the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory School Improvement Research Series  ...
Importance of Questioning <ul><li>More than 40% of instructional time is devoted to answering and responding to questions....
Levels of Questioning <ul><li>70 to 80% of the questions posed in both elementary and secondary schools are at the knowled...
Findings from the NW Regional Educational Laboratory <ul><li>The average wait-time teachers allow after posing a question ...
Wait Time Beyond 3 Seconds <ul><li>Increasing wait-time beyond three seconds is positively related to the following studen...
Extra-Long Wait Time <ul><li>Increasing wait-time beyond three seconds is positively related to the following outcomes:  <...
Recall Bloom’s Taxonomy <ul><li>Knowledge (recall) </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>Application </li></ul...
Varieties of Wait Time <ul><li>Wait Time I (immediately following a teacher’s question) </li></ul><ul><li>Wait Time II (fo...
Further Research on Questioning <ul><li>Asking questions at all intellectual levels  promotes higher-level thinking) </li...
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=Info Wait Time And Questioning

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Analysis of wait time in educational settings.

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=Info Wait Time And Questioning

  1. 1. LEARNING ABOUT QUESTIONING Materials from the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory School Improvement Research Series http://www.nwrel.org/scpd/sirs/3/cu5.html Modified by Phil Venditti
  2. 2. Importance of Questioning <ul><li>More than 40% of instructional time is devoted to answering and responding to questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Good questions, well-delivered, facilitate student learning and measure how well students are mastering content. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Levels of Questioning <ul><li>70 to 80% of the questions posed in both elementary and secondary schools are at the knowledge or recall level--the lowest intellectual level. </li></ul><ul><li>When given the opportunity to answer higher level questions, students demonstrate the ability to analyze, summarize and evaluate. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Findings from the NW Regional Educational Laboratory <ul><li>The average wait-time teachers allow after posing a question is one second or less. </li></ul><ul><li>Students whom teachers perceive as slow or poor learners are given less wait-time than those teachers view as more capable. </li></ul><ul><li>For lower cognitive questions, a wait-time of three seconds is most positively related to achievement, with less success resulting from shorter or longer wait-times. </li></ul><ul><li>There seems to be no wait-time threshold for higher cognitive questions; students seem to become more and more engaged and perform better and better the longer the teacher is willing to wait. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Wait Time Beyond 3 Seconds <ul><li>Increasing wait-time beyond three seconds is positively related to the following student outcomes: </li></ul><ul><li>(1) Improvements in student achievement </li></ul><ul><li>(2) Improvements in student retention </li></ul><ul><li>(3) Increases in the # of higher cognitive responses generated by students </li></ul><ul><li>(4) Increases in the length of student responses </li></ul><ul><li>(5) Increases in the number of unsolicited responses </li></ul><ul><li>(6) Decreases in students' failure to respond </li></ul><ul><li>(7) Increases in the amount and quality of evidence students offer </li></ul><ul><li>(8) Expansion of the variety of responses offered by students </li></ul><ul><li>(9) Increases in student-student interactions </li></ul><ul><li>(10) Increases in the # of questions posed by students </li></ul>
  6. 6. Extra-Long Wait Time <ul><li>Increasing wait-time beyond three seconds is positively related to the following outcomes: </li></ul><ul><li>(1) Increases in flexibility of teacher responses, with teachers listening more and engaging students in more discussions </li></ul><ul><li>(2) Increases in teacher expectations regarding students usually thought of as slow </li></ul><ul><li>(3) Expansion of the variety of questions asked by teachers </li></ul><ul><li>(4) Increases in the number of higher cognitive questions asked by teachers. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Recall Bloom’s Taxonomy <ul><li>Knowledge (recall) </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>Application </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesis </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation </li></ul>
  8. 8. Varieties of Wait Time <ul><li>Wait Time I (immediately following a teacher’s question) </li></ul><ul><li>Wait Time II (following a student’s answer) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Further Research on Questioning <ul><li>Asking questions at all intellectual levels  promotes higher-level thinking) </li></ul><ul><li>Redirecting questions  promotes interaction among students) </li></ul><ul><li>When to call on a student  try posing questions before calling on an individual </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid repeating students’ answers; it can cause them not to pay close attention </li></ul>

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