Go4 it! powerpoint without video for winter 2013 factc meeting
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Go4 it! powerpoint without video for winter 2013 factc meeting

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Information about an optional interinstitutional "Talk & Watch" faculty exchange program in Washington State two-year colleges

Information about an optional interinstitutional "Talk & Watch" faculty exchange program in Washington State two-year colleges

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Go4 it! powerpoint without video for winter 2013 factc meeting Go4 it! powerpoint without video for winter 2013 factc meeting Presentation Transcript

  • “GO4IT!” AN OPTIONAL MULTI-CLASS, MULTI- COLLEGE FACULTY EXCHANGE PROJECTThis material is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 United States License.
  • THE PLAN • Background & Rationale • Process • Outcomes • ImplicationsThis material is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 United States License.
  • THE INVITATION—PART 1 **OPTIONAL**OPTIONAL**OPTIONAL**OPTIONAL**Dear Faculty Colleagues:Would you like to find new ways to help your students?Do you think you might learn from how colleagues organize their courses andoversee their classes?Are you willing to visit and be visited by fellow teachers?If so, then... GO4IT!This material is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 United States License. View slide
  • THE INVITATION—PART 2 How? • Visit the classes of 4 colleagues (after first asking them for permission to come, of course!) • Watch. Listen. See what’s going on. • Think about how you could emulate the good things you observe. How Long? • For a total of 4 hours, anytime over a 4-day period. When? • During Week 4 of this quarter (Tuesday through Friday, January 22-25, just after the MLK holiday).This material is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 United States License. View slide
  • THE INVITATION—PART 3 What else? 1. You are NOT required to participate. (If you do participate, you are NOT required to go to four classes for four hours; those are just suggestions). 2. If someone asks to visit one or more of your classes, you may of course decline. 3. You do NOT have to write anything about what you see and do. 4. You do NOT have to ask or tell your supervisor that you are taking part (although that would probably be appreciated). 5. You ARE free to tell other people--including your supervisor and your students--what you learn from the experience. 6. You ARE invited to complete a really short, anonymous online questionnaire afterward to share what you learn.This material is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 United States License.
  • OBSERVATIONS INVISITSHTTP://YOUTU.BE/I6JYY8HSVBE
  • SAMPLE COMMENTSDear ********:Thanks again for the opportunity to visit one of your classes last week as part of the first GO4IT!Project. Here are some notes about the good things I observed and learned during my visit toclass: Using “conference-style” seating really helped focus the students’ attention on each other and you. The students all pitched in nicely to rearrange the furniture for this configuration, too. I loved the suspense and joy associated with having students read each other’s anonymous poems. Your questions and requests were unfailingly polite and nonconfrontational (e.g., “Can I ask you to read that line again?” “I’d like you to read that again, if you don’t mind”). You thoughtfully and successfully directed errant students’ attention to the task at hand (“This time is sacred”). I enjoyed your referring to each anonymous writer as “the poet,” which lent dignity to the proceedings. You knew and used your students’ names. You gently solicited participation and involvement (e.g., “Anything else anyone wants to say?” Many of the students quite freely offered their opinions and observations, even when not called on. You allowed repetition of various poetic phrases to extract their full impact. You used colorful similes and metaphors (e.g., “Poetry can be like candy: You need to savor it”). Your reminiscences and assessments about dandelions were touching and pertinent to the class activity. You maintained a positive and cheery demeanor throughout the entire session.I hope you’ll be able to participate in this experimental process again in the future and would behappy to have you come observe any of my classes. This material is licensed under a Creative Commons******* 3.0 United States License. Attribution
  • PARTICIPANTS—QUARTER #1 CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE • Linda Avery • Michele Jones • Sue Williams • DeWayne Grimes • Maureen Sparks • Sally Gove • John Walstrum • Phil Venditti BATES TECHNICAL COLLEGE • Tanya Sorenson PIERCE COLLEGE—FT. STEILACOOM • Diana CaseyThis material is licensed under a Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 United States License.