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From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example
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From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example

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Presentation by Pieter van der Hijden (pvdh@sofos.nl) of Sofos Consultancy (www.sofos.nl) and Stichting RechtenOnline (www.rechtenonline.nl) at the 39th annual conference of the International …

Presentation by Pieter van der Hijden (pvdh@sofos.nl) of Sofos Consultancy (www.sofos.nl) and Stichting RechtenOnline (www.rechtenonline.nl) at the 39th annual conference of the International Simulation and Gaming Association (ISAGA,, www.isaga.info); Kaunas, Lithuania, 2008.

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  • 1. From learning design to game design and back; the Cyberdam example Stichting RechtenOnline Project Leren in een Virtuele Wereld Projectleiding: Diny Peters Pieter van der Hijden Projectpartners: E-Merge Hogeschool Rotterdam Hogeschool Utrecht Strathclyde University Glasgow TU-Delft Universiteit Leiden Thieme Meulenhoff IJsfontein Pieter van der Hijden MSc ( [email_address] ) Stichting RechtenOnline (Foundation Law Online) Sofos Consultancy, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Presentation at 39 th ISAGA Annual Conference, Kaunas, Lithuania, 7-11 July 2008
  • 2. Introduction www.cyberdam.nl
  • 3. Introduction www.cyberdam.nl
  • 4. Many game design tools exist
    • Examples of classifications:
      • Gaming the future’s language; Richard Duke; Sage Publications, 1974.
      • Patterns in game-design; Staffan Björk, Jussi Holopainen; Charles River Media, 2005.
  • 5. Patterns in Game Design; Staffan Björk & Jussi Holopainen; 2005
  • 6. Relation design tools <-> external goals of game are vague
  • 7. Learning designers use thei own tools and concepts
    • Towards a Pattern Language for Networked Learning; Peter Goodyear et al.; NLC 2004
    • The on-line report on pedagogical techniques for computer-mediated communication; M.Paulsen; 1995
    • Training complex cognitive skills: a four component instructional design model for technical training; J. van Merriënboer; 1997
    • Digital didactics
  • 8. Towards a Pattern Language for Networked Learning; Peter Goodyear et al.; NLC 2004
  • 9. The on-line report on pedagogical techniques for computer-mediated communication; M.Paulsen; 1995
  • 10. Training complex cognitive skills: a four component instructional design model for technical training; J. van Merriënboer; 1997
  • 11. Digital Didactics
  • 12. Where can game design and learning design meet?
  • 13. A pattern language; Christopher Alexander et al.; 1977
    • A pattern describes a problem which occurs over and over again in our environment, and then describes the core of the solution to that problem, in such a way that you can use this solution a million times over, without ever doing it the same way twice.
  • 14. Educational institutes ask to justify the use of games
    • Context
    • Intended audience
    • Prerequisites
    • Learning objectives
  • 15. How are requirements on learning objectives met by game?
  • 16. How are requirements on learning objectives met by game?
    • House-of-Quality
    • QFD – Quality Function Deployment
    http://pages.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/~jadalow/seng613/qfd_summary.html
  • 17. How are requirements on learning objectives met by game? http://www.pd-trak.com/devtools.htm
  • 18. Lessons from the Cyberdam project
    • Welcome to Cyberdam
  • 19. Welcome to Cyberdam
    • Cyberdam:
      • 25 Online Role Playing Games
      • Virtual city as common playground
      • Internet application to develop, deploy and run these games
      • Organisation to support it
  • 20. Welcome to Cyberdam
  • 21. Welcome to Dharadam Dharadam was created during the 5th ISAGA Summer School in Delhi, India, 21-30 June 2008 by Aashish Bhardwaj (India), Vinod Dumblekar (India), Renata Furman (Poland), Monica Mor (India), Vladimir Solodov (Russian Federation), Joanna Woźniakiewicz (Poland) and team manager  Pieter van der Hijden (The Netherlands). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- Noncommercial -Share Alike 3.0 Unported License .
  • 22. Cyberdam screenshot
  • 23. Definition phase Set boundaries and external requirements Define the game Explore the domain of possible games Identify basic learning opportunities Know the topic of the game Deep reading Know the gaming environment Cyberdam demo Assessment of available resources Offered/wanted exercise Design relevance Activity
  • 24. Definition phase
  • 25. Design phase 1/2 Exploring possible actions between roles Filling the communications matrix Identify relevant roles in the game Assessment of stakeholders (max. 7) Completing and reducing set of stakeholders Categorising stakeholders Diverging complexity Brainstorming on stakeholders Design relevance Activity
  • 26. Design phase
  • 27. Design phase 2/2 Set the boundaries for the playground map Determine the magic circle Guard internal consistency All roles: cross check Global specification of activities from step to step Per role: plausible scenario to go from A to B Materials for briefing, individual targets Per role: initial state A and end state B Design relevance Activity
  • 28. Design phase
  • 29. Realisation phase NA Make the playground map NA Per role – per step: write instructions NA Realise playground characters NA Recapitulate the design, resolve any issues Design relevance Activity
  • 30. Realisation phase
  • 31. Implementation phase NA Preparing first run and launch NA Preparing introduction, briefing, debriefing Design relevance Activity
  • 32. Implementation phase
  • 33. Conclusions
    • Learning design may have got more scientific attention than gaming design;
    • Nevertheless, gaming patterns are more elaborated than learning patterns;
    • Matrix could bring both patterns together; for practical reasons: relevant cells have to be identified in advance;
    • Reminder: Designing is not only an analytical process.
  • 34. Discussion www.cyberdam.nl
  • 35. www.cyberdam.nl www.cyberdam.nl 2008 – Stichting RechtenOnline Pieter van der Hijden ( [email_address] )

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