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The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?
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The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?

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The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education? …

The mobile movement: what does this mean for tertiary education?

March 2012

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  • 1. The mobile movement: what does thismean for tertiary education? Assoc Prof Philip Uys Director, Strategic Learning and Teaching Innovation Division of Learning and Teaching Services Charles Sturt University, Australia <puys@csu.edu.au> DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 2. 1. Introduction2. Examining the impact of mobile devices on the sector3. Investigating mobile learning for Charles Sturt University4. Identifying and overcoming ethical, educational, technicaland general challenges5. Implementing a mobile strategy that best aligns withstudent and staff expectations for learning, communicationand campus experience6. Summary DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 3. 1. Introduction- Sponsor CSU mLearn project; 2011 mlearning seminars in SA; judge of GSMAs 17thGlobal Mobile Awards (Best Mobile Innovation for Education or Learning)- mlearning - mLearning is about supporting the mobility of the learner (anywhere, anytime) - We are using the students devices (not the institution’s) and moving into their world in a more direct and personal way - Focus is on student learning (not access to general administrative information e.g. time tables, maps) - Synchronous and asynchronous - Offline and online DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 4. 2. Examining the impact of mobiledevices on the sector- general access to the “University”; learning and teaching; research – willfocus on the impact on learning in this presentation DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 5. - CSU Ed Tech survey responses June 2010 (n=4000) • 87% of students want to revisit work from lectures on their handheld/mobile device • Students were evenly split (50/50) among those who wish to access on campus information; subject information; subject readings; assessments or notifications on a handheld/mobile device. • Since 2005 we have surveyed our first year students in the School of Communication about a range of technology/media issues. Of the 207 surveyed in 2010 - 94% own a portable media player (e.g. iPod) and 80% use iTunes at least weekly. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 6. - CSU website access through mobile devices per month: January 2012: 51, 533 visits (growth of more than 1000% since January 2010) iOS accounted for 40,000. Total 245,508 unique visitors = 21% mobile- Other needs at CSU: - CSU students doing fieldwork need to access CSU’s learning and teaching systems wherever they are. - The envisaged increase in students from lower SES backgrounds could see a decrease in privately owned laptops with a resultant higher ratio of mobile (small screen) devices. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 7. - some mlearning developments in Australasia and beyond• Take up by many universities in Australasia and internationally• Abilene Christian University: initial findings from 2008 to 2009 were above 80%satisfaction and the last two years this has risen to over 90%.http://www.acu.edu/technology/mobilelearning/documents/ACU2009-10MobileLearningReport.pdf(ACU, 2011) 84 percent of ACUs faculty reported using their devices frequently in class tofacilitate enhanced classroom collaboration. 86 percent of students reported improvedstudent-to-student and student-to-teacher collaboration when using mobile devices in theinstructional process.• Oklahoma State University reported 75% agreed or strongly agreed with the statement,“I think the iPad enhanced the learning experience of this course.”http://news.okstate.edu/press-releases/929-ipad-study-released-by-oklahoma-state-university• Earlypilot programs have found that students feel that mobile technology encouragesexploration of additional course topics, helps manage time, provides new functions/tools, increases learning, and makes courses more interesting (University of NotreDame, 2011) and provide additional motivation for learning (Bond University, 2011) DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 8. • The Horizon Project is a long-running qualitative research project that seeks to identifyand describe emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning,research, or creative expression within learning-focused organisations. For the last threeyears mobile learning has featured as the number one emerging technology bothinternationally and in Australasia• Mobile devices (such as Phones, Smart phones, PDA’s, Tablets, Netbooks and PortableGaming Platforms) are more common and we are seeing an increase in usage ofhandheld ‘mobile’ devices by staff, community members and students. Many of these areInternet capable, able to connect to the Internet via a wireless connection, or via the 3Gmobile phone network.• A typical Smartphone has not only a wireless internet connection but a GPS,accelerometer, compass and multi-touch interface which can be developed to create amuch more personal experience where content can be delivered, created andcontextualized by a student’s physical location.http://www.lukew.com/resources/articles/MobileFirst_LukeW.pdf• In the 3 years (2006-2009) mobile web traffic on the AT&T network in the USAincreased 50 times AT&T, Morgan Stanley Research DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 9. • Tremendous growth in the number of new mobile devices, specifically tablets,expected over the next few years. Gartner predicts word wide rollout of 54.8 million tabletunits in 2011, 103.4 million in 2012 and 154.2 million in 2013 on top of the 11 million soldin 2010.http://printceo.com/2010/11/gartner%E2%80%99s-optimistic-predictions-of-tablet-growth/ DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 10. • In the final quarter of 2010 Fortune reported that Smartphones outsold PCs for thefirst time – a full two years before the prediction by Morgan Stanley – and according tothe UN Telecommunications Agency www.itu.int 77% of the world’s population nowhas mobile devices.• By 2013, mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common Web access deviceworldwide – Gartner Inc, 2010http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1278413• By 2015, 80% of people accessing the Internet will be doing so from mobile devices– 2011 Horizon Reporthttp://wp.nmc.org/horizon2011/sections/mobiles/ The technology is here, ready, available and in widespread use BUT availability does not mean that students are demanding it or that by itself it has potential to enhance learning DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 11. A survey last year (2010) of 200 iPhone-owning Stanford students portrayedthem as digitally obsessed, even addicted. Most slept next to their phones. Aquarter said their phones were "dangerously alluring."But when Stanfords School of Medicine lent iPads to all new students lastAugust, a curious thing happened: Many didnt like using them in class. Officialshad hoped to stop printing an annual average of 3,700 pages of coursematerials per medical student, encouraging them to use digital materialsinstead. Some students rebelled, and Stanford was forced to resume offeringprinted notes to those who wanted them. In most classes, half the students hadstopped using their iPads only a few weeks into the term. May 2011 http://chronicle.com/article/The-Slow-Motion-Mobile-Campus/127380/ DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 12. Impact on learning “There is something counter-intuitive but familiar about this approach to technology: new technologies often heralded and sold as “revolutionary,” are deployed to do the same old things” (p. 11). Hanley, L. (2011). Teacher as bricoleur. Radical Teacher, 90, 9-14. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 13. - focus on distinctive aspectsSuch as using the:5.inherent affordances of mobile devices themselves (mobility, GPS,etc.)as well as the2. functionality on the devices (apps) DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 14. - A few standout items of the “24 benefits of mobile learning - MarcusBoyes” -1.Relevance: mobile learning enables training and evidence collection to be ‘situated rather than simulated’ and so it makes learning possible at the point of need e.g. Induction - 2. Elimination of technologicaland acceptance barriers: the use of a learner’s own mobile device means they are already familiar with the technology, eliminating technological barriers to accessing learning. - 3. Context sensitive learning: with GPS and the use of QR codes learning can become specific to a location DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 15. Distinctive capabilities in learning and teaching through (personas):1. Students accessing learning materials2. Performing learning tasks3. Participating in learning interactions4. Performing assessment tasks7. Students accessing learning support6. Evaluating teaching DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 16. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 17. a. eBooksMartha (28) is studying by distance. Whilston the train she is able to browse booksand resources in an online store on heriPad. Before she reaches her destinationshe has read a few samples and chosen topurchase an eBook of her prescribed textso she can avoid lugging the large volumeprint copy to and from work. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 18. b. Pod/VodcastsRachel (43) has two children and is enrolledin CSU through distance education. Sheuses mobile technology mostly to completeher readings while on the move. She is ableto access podcasts of her lectures while sheis preparing dinner using iTunesU, and onher hands free mobile phone while travellingto work and socially DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 19. 3. Performing learning tasks DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 20. • Research Andre (42) is a 4th year education student on practicum in a small country town teaching year 2 children. He uses an iPad to find relevant articles and add it to “Instapaper” to read later (“Instapaper” also allows Andre to change the font, size and colour.) DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 21. b. ePortfolio/Personal Learning SystemLiz (24) is a final year student in B.Information Studies (DE only), currentlystudying Social Networking in Info Studiessubject. She is able to update her ePortfoliousing her smartphone to keep a record of any meetings that she will have in regards to work or study.She also uses the Pebble Pad applicationon her smart phone todocument emergent,unintentional learning. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 22. send x-ray with comments to academic for upload/upload in LMSc. Mobile CaptureMick (44) is a mature age student, family man andfarming outside Broken Hill. He is in his second year ofstudy doing an joint agricultural /health science diplomaby DE. Out in the field, where there is no networkconnection, Mick is still able to use his phone to takephotos of examples from his study guide which are alsogeo-tagged. When he is back at the homestead he isable to upload them to the forums for discussion with hispeers.. This supports contingent learning (reacting to theenvironment and changing experiences), situatedlearning (learning takes place in the surroundings thatmake learning meaningful). Mick also sends x-rays from outstations with comments to the academic for upload in the LMS, or sometimes upload it himself at the homestead. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 23. d. Geo-taggingKevin (20) is a student in environmentalscience who with fellow students visits anatural reserve near Sydney where variousplants and trees are geo-tagged to deliveronline information and enhance users’experiences via photo, video, audio andtext; on the user’s mobile device. Kevincan add to the information which is thenavailable to his peers. It is developed asan environmental teaching tool as well asan eco-guide for natural reserves andparks. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 24. e. SMSMichael (23) is a final year Vet student. Hehas a basic mobile phone (not a smartphone). He accesses CSU’s intelligentmobile answer engine that deliversknowledge bits over SMS. The return SMSwill contain the exact answer to the queryand not links to answers. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 25. 4. Participating in learning interactions DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 26. a. CHATAndre (42) is a 4th year education studenton practicum in a small country townteaching year 2 children. He uses an iPad toaccess his Learning Management Systemmodules and communicates with otherstudents in the class using the chat tool. Inaddition, he belongs to a Mixit study groupwhere he also participates actively in chats.He is also a bof on using his mobile phoneto participate in Twitter discussions. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 27. b. Messaging System - the LearningManagement SystemPete (41) is an academic teaching adistance education cohort in the Outback,with only two residential schools persession per year. His students in theregion have intermittent Internet access atbest and the mobile networks are far morerobust. Pete sends notifications to students(using SMS) regarding the availability ofnew Internet resources as they are postedso students know when they need to getonline. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 28. c. Web Application ClientLiz (24) is a final year student in Bachelor ofInformation Studies currently studying a SocialNetworking subject. The class is immersed andengaged with variety of Web 2.0 tools integrated inSakai OAE. Using a web application client, the classis able to aggregate and share content on theirGalaxy Tablet from a variety of sites and applicationsin one central location. For Liz this is a great timesaver. She can also use tools she is already usingand familiar with. This supports personalised learning(learning is customised for the preferences, historyand abilities of individual learners or groups oflearners). DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 29. 5. Performing assessment tasks DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 30. a. Self Assessment ToolsJames (29) is studying a health sciencedegree. James is about to undertake amultiple choice test on the train as part ofhis subject revision. To access this, Jamesuses his tablet and an environmentspecifically designed for mobile use. Oncecomplete, James will get instantaneousfeedback from the test and see where hemay need to focus his studies for the exam DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 31. b. OLE Access – online assignmentsubmissionSam (28) is a trainee parks managercompleting a Bachelor of EnvironmentalSciences. Sam is struggling to connect toanything because of his location (very remote).Sam struggles with a poor internet connectionon his homestead but is able to get mobilereception in some locations with higherelevation. Sam is able to take his tabletcomputer and submit his assessments usinghis mobile connection saving a long trek intotown. Mobile learning thus addressesgeographical or spatial distance. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 32. c. Radio-frequency identification (RFID)James (29) is studying a health sciencedegree. He is required to attend a trade fair inSydney and check in with at least half of thestalls at the fair. RFID uses radio waves totransfer data from an electronic tag attached tothe student, through a reader for the purposeof identifying and tracking the object. Studentswear RFID bracelets that connects them totheir Facebook and Twitter pages. At eachstation they scan their bracelet and have apost or tweet automatically sent to their pages. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 33. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 34. a. Learning Support Tools and SMSRobyn (58) is a mature age student returning to studyafter 25 years in the workforce. She is struggling withthe Learning Management System and with the DEmaterials that are so different from when she got herdegree. Fortunately she is able to access a range ofresources and tools to help her, including interactivetutorials so she is able to see how things work. She hasto contribute to a Wiki in one of her subjects and afterwatching a video showing how wiki formatting is doneshe feels more confident. She has downloaded a cheatsheet to her mobile that lists all the codes so she canrefer to it quickly whenever and wherever she needs to.Furthermore, she has elected to receive targeted SMSmessages such as reminders of assessments andencouraging messages at crucial milestones. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 35. 6. Evaluating teaching DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 36. a. Classroom FeedbackLeanne (31) - first year academic teaching Accounting.It’s her first full time teaching position and she isnervous about her performance and she will be incharge of reviewing and updating the subject nextsession. Leanne wants to ensure that she is engagingwith the students, that they are finding the subjectinformation useful and the assessments beneficial soshe has deployed a range of feedback tools to hersubject materials through mobile devices. Students can“like” sections of the online modules as well as makecomments, which are recorded anonymously. Studentshave already commented on a number of areas that aredifficult to understand and she now knows that theyneed further development. Students are able to updatetheir comments simultaneously, using a smart phone. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 37. 3. mLearning at CSU DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 38. http://www.csu.edu.au/division/lts/docs/role/ltsystemsdashboard.pdf DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 39. Implementation thus far: - 2012 iTunesU (private) with CSU Replay - since 2008 podcast tool in Interact: 2011 in 714 subject sites, out of approx 3600 sites = 20% - since 2010 ePortfolio/PLE system mobile web and iPhone/iPad app 2011 - 2013 mLearn project at CSU - within the unique context of Charles Sturt University DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 40. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 41. http://eportfolio.csu.edu.au/pebblepad/mobile DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 42. • General mobile access available since mid-2011: mobile web available targetingiphones and android phones http://m.csu.edu.au DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 43. - 2011 TO 2013 to expand mlearning and explore sustainability issues(around $.5 million): • Mobilise specific features and tools from Interact (CSU’s learning management system Sakai) then Interact 2 (Sakai OAE) as a whole (2013) • Run trials of tablet devices: nuclear medicine; eCommerce; education • Develop mobile friendly media-rich learning materials, and • Mobilise the subject evaluation system. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 44. 4. Identifying and overcomingethical, educational, technical andgeneral challenges DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 45. Ethical issues• Inequity across different socio-economicgroups and ability to use the technology –organisation could provide; alternatives;decreasing cost of devices; blended• Radiation: disputes around tumourcreation, impact on fertility - appropriate riskreduction strategies• Negative impact on sight and hearing –blended learning DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 46. • Mobile use in class, and inassessment contexts DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 47. Educational issues• Integrated within blended and flexiblelearning• Deep versus shallow learning DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 48. • In-the-flesh communication vs mediated• Appreciate diversified learning preferences• Respect cognitive load (“head space”)• Limitations of multi-tasking DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 49. • Redefined role of the teacher/educator?• Informal/mobile language acceptable? DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 50. Technical issues• Variable access (regional and ruralAustralia) – National Broadband Network DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 51. • strain on wirelessnetworks (Stanford; Duke:3 years to expand wireless andcellular coverage to 95 % of themajor areas on campus) http://www.ausnetech.com.au/images/cartoons/sept2004.gif DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 52. • Variable platforms (apps against open“web” philosophy), create once, publisheverywhere – the promise of HTML5compliancy. DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 53. General issues• Is it a fad? Gartner’s Hype cycle • Spaces are not neutral e.g. in evaluation DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 54. 5. Implementing a mobile strategythat best aligns with student andstaff expectations for learning,communication and campusexperience DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 55. - a mobile learning strategy has three key elements: LAP modeladjusted from http://www.slideshare.net/dmolsenwvu/developing-a-progressive-mobile-strategy-bdconf-version DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 56. Building mLearning content- Integrate as part of the learning processi.e “doing” and interactivity, not just listen/read (supported by mlearning)(Traditional: Learning outcomes  learning content) DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 57. - Select the apps to be used (especially free ones!) – distinctive of mlearning http://langwitches.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Bloom-iPads- Apps.jpg DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 58. - consider platform: SMS / mobile web / mobile app (off-line + features of devicee.g. Geo-location)- consider special affordances of mobile devices that might add to the learnerexperience DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 59. One of the keys of a mobile learning strategy for highereducation: Produse: Use mobile learning to produce and consume knowledge Herrington, A., Herrington, J. & Mantei, J. (2009). Design principles for mobile learning. In J. Herrington, A. Herrington, J. Mantei, I. Olney, & B. Ferry (Eds.), New technologies, new pedagogies: Mobile learning in higher education (pp. 129-138). Wollongong: University of Wollongong. Retrieved from http://ro.uow.edu.au/edupapers/88/ DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 60. URLsmLearn project at CSUhttp://www.csu.edu.au/division/landt/resources/mobilelearning/index.htmmLearning project bloghttp://mlearnproject.wordpress.com/Uys, Philip mLearning collectionhttp://www.globe-online.com/mobilelearning24 benefits of mobile learning, by Marcus Boyeshttp://insights.elearningnetwork.org/?p=507mLearning in Higher Education (Curated by Tim Klapdor)http://www.scoop.it/t/mlearning-in-higher-education DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 61. Design principles for mobile learninghttp://ro.uow.edu.au/edupapers/88/Top 50 Mobile Learning Resourceshttp://www.upsidelearning.com/blog/index.php/2009/11/02/top-50-mobile-learning-resourcesADL Mobile Learning Handbookhttps://sites.google.com/a/adlnet.gov/mobile-learning-guide/homeTop 50 mLearning Resourceshttp://www.slideshare.net/UpsideLearning/top-50mlearningmobilelearningresources DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 62. 6. Summary- Plan – design – implement – evaluate-- Seek out appropriate apps- Use the inherent affordances of the mobile devices DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 63. - Use mobile learning to generate knowledge- We are in their world- DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES
  • 64. Thank youSlides available from www.globe-online.com/philip.uys Assoc Prof Philip Uys Director, Strategic Learning and Teaching Innovation Division of Learning and Teaching Services Charles Sturt University, Australia <puys@csu.edu.au> DIVISION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING SERVICES

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