Putnam Income Fund Q&A Q2 2013

  • 93 views
Uploaded on

The overriding factor influencing fixed-income performance was the market’s changing expectations as to when the Federal Reserve would begin tapering its quantitative easing program. The fund’s …

The overriding factor influencing fixed-income performance was the market’s changing expectations as to when the Federal Reserve would begin tapering its quantitative easing program. The fund’s mortgage prepayment strategies, most notably our holdings of collateralized mortgage obligations, detracted from performance before rebounding in June. Our interest-rate and yield-curve positioning aided performance during the quarter. Our near-term outlook calls for continued positive economic growth and a potentially range-bound interest-rate environment.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
93
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PUTNAM INVESTMENTS | putnam.com Key takeaways •The overriding factor influencing fixed-income performance was the market’s changing expectations as to when the Federal Reserve would begin tapering its quantitative easing program. •The fund’s mortgage prepayment strategies, most notably our holdings of collateralized mortgage obligations, detracted from performance before rebounding in June. •Our interest-rate and yield-curve positioning aided performance during the quarter. •Our near-term outlook calls for continued positive economic growth and a potentially range-bound interest-rate environment. What was the bond market environment like during the second quarter of 2013? Spread sectors, meaning sectors that trade at a yield premium to U.S. Treasuries, continued to modestly rally during the first month of the period. However, in May, the market backdrop changed, as investors increasingly debated when the Federal Reserve would begin to taper its stimulative bond-buying program. In June, bonds remained under pressure following Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s announcement that the central bank could begin pulling back on its stimulus program later in 2013, and end it by mid 2014. All told, the market’s anticipation of the transition in Fed policy created volatility, causing yields to rise and prices to fall across most market sectors. What triggered the change in the Fed’s policy stance regarding quantitative easing? U.S. economic data, including employment, has been slowly improving, while inflation has continued to hover below the Fed’s target of two-and-a-half percent. The central bank hasn’t taken direct action yet, but it is letting investors know that if these encouraging trends continue, it may ease up on its $85 billion of monthly bond purchases. In his announcement, Chairman Bernanke made the analogy to driving a car: “Any slowing in the pace of purchases will be akin to letting up a bit on the gas pedal as the car picks up speed, not to applying the brakes.” So, the Fed was trying to convey the message that when it does begin to reduce its bond purchases, it will do so gradually. At the same time, the Fed reiterated that it would keep its target for short-term interest rates near zero until the jobless rate falls much further, even after its bond purchases end. Portfolio Managers Michael V. Salm (industry since 1989) Brett S. Kozlowski, CFA (industry since 1997) Kevin F. Murphy (industry since 1988) Q2 | 2013 » Putnam Income Fund Q&A Bonds struggle as investors debate Federal Reserve timetable for curtailing stimulus
  • 2. Q2 2013 | Bonds struggle as investors debate Federal Reserve timetable for curtailing stimulus PUTNAM INVESTMENTS | putnam.com 2 Let’s shift gears and talk about which strategies bolstered the fund’s performance during the quarter? Our term-structure strategies — interest-rate and yield- curve positioning — proved moderately beneficial, as we generally took less interest-rate risk during a quarter marked by rising Treasury yields. Additionally, our hold- ings of commercial mortgage-backed securities [CMBS] helped performance, especially earlier in the period, as investors capitalized on attractive spreads and positive underlying fundamentals in the sector. Which strategies weren’t as productive? Overall, our mortgage prepayment strategies hurt the fund’s results. As the quarter began, given the uncer- tainty about Fed policy, the pace of home refinancing, and interest rates still at low levels, our holdings of collateralized mortgage obligations [CMOs] significantly underperformed. In June, we sought to capitalize on CMOs’ improved relative value by increasing the portfo- lio’s allocation, which worked well during the quarter’s final month. With the increase in interest rates, CMOs rallied, because higher rates led to slower prepayments of the mortgages underlying the securities. What is your outlook for the coming months? As investors adjust their expectations about when the Fed will actually begin to wind down quantitative easing, we expect some degree of volatility in interest rates and yield spreads. However, while rates rose during the quarter, we think it’s unlikely that they are going to suddenly spike dramatically higher, and they may remain range bound. As a result, we believe the environment for corporate credit and other risk-based fixed-income categories may continue to be favorable. That said, if spreads expand more than economic funda- mentals seem to warrant, we may view that as a window of opportunity to add attractively valued securities to the portfolio. Where are you finding the most compelling investment opportunities? In terms of the yield curve, we think the better opportu- nities exist among intermediate-maturity securities, as opposed to short-term bonds, which remain anchored by Fed policy. In light of positive economic growth and solid corporate fundamentals, we expect to hold an overweight position in investment-grade corporate bonds. Within investment-grade credit, we like bonds issued by banks and other financial institutions, as well as utilities. We’re less optimistic about securities from large pharmaceutical and defense companies, and expect to largely avoid those industry groups. Lastly, after the liquidity-driven selloff in mortgage credit, we modestly added back non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities positions during June, seeking to benefit from their improved relative value supported by solid fundamentals.
  • 3. Q2 2013 | Bonds struggle as investors debate Federal Reserve timetable for curtailing stimulus Putnam Retail Management Putnam Investments | One Post Office Square | Boston, MA 02109 | putnam.com EO134 281759 7/13 The opinions expressed here are those of the portfolio managers as of June 30, 2013, and are subject to change with market conditions. Market forecasts cannot be guaranteed and are not to be construed as investment advice. Consider these risks before investing: Funds that invest in government securities are not guaranteed. Mortgage-backed securities are subject to prepayment risk and the risk that they may increase in value less when interest rates decline and decline in value more when interest rates rise. Bond investments are subject to interest-rate risk (the risk of bond prices falling if interest rates rise) and credit risk (the risk of an issuer defaulting on interest or principal payments). Interest- rate risk is greater for longer-term bonds, and credit risk is greater for below-investment-grade bonds. Risks associated with derivatives include increased investment exposure (which may be considered leverage) and, in the case of over- the-counter instruments, the potential inability to terminate or sell derivatives positions and the potential failure of the other party to the instrument to meet its obligations. Unlike bonds, funds that invest in bonds have fees and expenses. Bond prices may fall or fail to rise over time for several reasons, including general financial market conditions and factors related to a specific issuer or industry. You can lose money by investing in the fund. Request a prospectus or summary prospectus from your financial representative or by calling 1-800-225-1581. The prospectus includes investment objectives, risks, fees, expenses, and other information that you should read and consider carefully before investing. Putnam Income Fund (PINCX) Annualized total return performance as of June 30, 2013 Class A shares (inception 11/1/54) Before sales charge After sales charge Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index Last quarter -2.56% -6.46% -2.33% 1 year 4.49 0.31 -0.69 3 years 5.57 4.14 3.51 5 years 7.93 7.05 5.19 10 years 5.45 5.02 4.52 Life of fund 7.81 7.73 — Total expense ratio: 0.86% Returns for periods of less than one year are not annualized. Current performance, which may be lower or higher than the quoted past performance, cannot guarantee future results. Share price, principal value, and return will vary, and you may have a gain or a loss when you sell your shares. After-sales- charge returns reflect a maximum sales charge of 4.00%. Performance of other share classes will vary. For the most recent month-end performance, visit putnam.com. The fund’s expense ratio is based on the most recent prospectus and is subject to change. The Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index is an unmanaged index of U.S. investment-grade fixed-income securities. You cannot invest directly in an index.