Protein synthesis Horner Jacob (cooler than Michael Lin)
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Protein synthesis Horner Jacob (cooler than Michael Lin)

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Protein synthesis Horner Jacob (cooler than Michael Lin) Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Protein Synthesis By Jacob Horner
  • 2. Nucleus Ribosomes Cytoplasm
  • 3. Nucleus Ribosomes
  • 4. Nucleus
  • 5. TACCGGCCCATAATC
  • 6. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 7. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 8. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 9. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 10. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 11. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 12. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 13. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 14. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 15. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 16. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 17. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 18. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 19. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 20. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 21. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 22. Nucleus Ribosomes Nuclear Pore Cytoplasm
  • 23. Ribosomes – bind mRNA and tRNA to synthesize polypeptides and proteins. Start Codon Codons Stop Codon
  • 24. Larger Subunit Smaller Subunit
  • 25. Amino acids tRNA Anti-codon UAC CGG
  • 26. UAC CGG
  • 27. UAC CGG CGG
  • 28. UAC CGG CGG
  • 29. UAC CGG CGG
  • 30. UAC CGG CGG
  • 31. UAC CGG CGG CGG
  • 32. UAC CGG CGG CGG
  • 33. UAC CGG CGG CGG
  • 34. UAC CGG CGG CGG
  • 35. STOP UAC CGG CGG CGG
  • 36. STOP AUC UAC CGG CGG CGG
  • 37. STOP UAC CGG CGG CGG AUC
  • 38. STOP UAC CGG CGG CGG AUC
  • 39. STOP UAC CGG CGG CGG AUC
  • 40. STOP UAC CGG CGG CGG AUC
  • 41. The amino acid chain is folding into a tertiary structure so it can function.
  • 42. The amino acid chain is folding into a tertiary structure so it can function.
  • 43. The amino acid chain is folding into a tertiary structure so it can function.
  • 44. The amino acid chain is folding into a tertiary structure so it can function.
  • 45. Summary Beginning in the nucleus, we zoom in on a strand of DNA. RNA polymerase comes in to unwind the double-stranded DNA. As it unwinds the DNA, it reads the nitrogenous bases and finds their complement, creating a strand of mRNA (messenger RNA). Except, in this case, Adenine’s base pair is not thymine, because it is replaced by uracil. This process is called transcription.
  • 46. Summary (cont.) The strand of mRNA breaks off and we zoom out of the nucleus. The mRNA then leaves the nucleus through a small pore called the nuclear pore. Once the mRNA strand is in the cytoplasm, it binds with a ribosome. Now, we begin translation. First, we zoom in on the ribosome and mRNA strand. Ribosomes bind mRNA and tRNA (translation RNA) to synthesize polypeptides and proteins. Ribosomes have a large and small subunit.
  • 47. Summary (cont.) The first group of bases is known as the start codon. The middle ones are known as codons and the last one in known as the stop codon. tRNA comes in, carrying the bases complements called the anticodon. With an amino acid attached, tRNA connects the bases with their compliments on the start codon. The same thing is happening to the second codon. Once the start codon has received its complementary bases, tRNA leaves, leaving behind its amino acid.
  • 48. Summary (cont.) The amino acid then attaches to the second codon’s amino acid, forming a polypeptide bond. Another tRNA comes in to supply the third codon with its complementary bases. tRNA leaves the second codon, leaving behind the polypeptide bond. That then attatches to the third codon’s tRNA amino acid. Then another tRNA comes in with the fourth codon’s complements. This cycle continues until you get to the stop codon.
  • 49. Summary (cont.) The stop codon ends the cycle, not leaving an amino acid. The amino acid chain that is formed cannot function until it folds into a tertiary structure, so it does. Thus, ending translation.
  • 50. THE END