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Dive into Digital Badges! A Badge Curriculum Workshop
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Dive into Digital Badges! A Badge Curriculum Workshop

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#badgecurric presentation at #alaac14 by Emily Ford, Nicole Pagowsky, & Annie Pho

#badgecurric presentation at #alaac14 by Emily Ford, Nicole Pagowsky, & Annie Pho

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  • Goal: to introduce those unfamiliar with badges to possibilities, and get those ready to think about structure and specifics a head start on the process. We have to leave a lot of information out since there is just too much to cover in the entire scope of badging, but we hope this workshop provides you with a general overview and some food for thought. We will be using the #badgecurric during this session and to continue the conversation on afterward.
  • Two things to point out…… (next 2 slides) <br /> 1: Badges do not solve all problems <br /> 2: Badges are instructional design
  • A few months ago a friend on Facebook linked to an article in ScienceInsider that validates what we have known for a long time: lectures are an ineffective way for students to learn. Instead, active learning is the way to go. And what’s more active than games? http://news.sciencemag.org/education/2014/05/lectures-arent-just-boring-theyre-ineffective-too-study-finds <br /> There is also something to be said from active learning with a reward structure. A reward structure that is rigid enough to let you know what you have to achieve to move on to the next level, but also flexible enough to allow for surprises along the way, much like this warp challenge pictured here from Super Mario Brothers, keep users engaged and motivated to continue along the path to achieve set goals. Some research on motivation and using badges in education has been performed, and it has shown that for some kinds of learners badge systems can be motivating, for others it is not. <br /> <br /> Nicole will talk a bit more about this in a few minutes.
  • Intro - competency-based education <br /> In higher ed we keep talking about is the value of an education. In recent years outcome or competency based education has gained more traction in higher ed. One only need do a basic search on the Chronicle of Higher Education’s web site to find a plethora of articles, blog posts, and other artifacts that attest to this phenomenon. <br /> <br /> Students pay so much, and by the time they are done with their schooling they have a transcript with grades and a degree. But grades and degrees don’t effectively surface and acknowledge for students or their future employers, exactly what skills students have gained. While it can communicate to the student and to future employers and the public a certain level of knowledge about a subject, four-year degrees do a bad job of communicating certain acquired skills. Usually these skills aren’t attached to a credit hour or even a program of study. Rather, they are the lesser defined skills acquired over the course of time. Might be: writing and editing, leading discussions or projects, and, of course, what we are going to talk about today: information literacy. <br /> More and more students seem (at least a PSU) to want to know what they are learning and want to be able to communicate what skills and knowledge they have gained. And more and more higher education is talking about a competency-based curriculum. In higher education, badges are one such way to certify competencies. <br /> By credentialing achievements at a more granular level, be it with badges or any other acknowledgement, students are more aware of what they are learning and what they will bring with them into wherever they go next. It also is a way that students can be more aware of how their learning fits into the outcomes expressed by an instructor.
  • Who is using Badges? <br /> One of the reasons badges have been getting so much attention is that there is an initiative backed by the MacArthur Foundation and the Mozilla Foundation to expand the use of digital badges to improve learning and outcomes for students. <br /> So what are some examples of badge projects? <br /> 1.Dallas Museum of Art’s membership program uses badges to enhance visitor interaction with exhibits <br /> 2.Online social networking sites around a hobby. This example is from Untappd, a beer-focused site <br /> 3.Educause uses badges at the ELI Annual Meeting to certify and encourage participation <br /> 4.4Square has partnered with the History Channel to award badges to promote engagement
  • -Working closely with 3 faculty members and one instructional designer from our office of Academic innovation <br /> -outcomes mapped: ASPPH Domains of Knowledge: Public Health to SCH Outcomes to Library Learning Outcomes; curriculum identified, assignments and syllabi revamped <br /> -each class might require different assignments to earn the badges, but they all map to the same outcomes. E.g. Contributor assignment: PHE 250 they are writing a blog, PHE 327 they are writing and submitting editorials; PHE 354U they are writing article responses and engaging in a peer review of each others’ commentaries. Similarly PHE 250 search techniques is more about using search engines effectively, whereas other classes are about library database use <br /> -launching in Fall 2014
  • I’m working with a colleague on creating a digital badge system for our first year writing course. This section is the heaviest demand on library instruction where we usually do a 1-2 shot session.
  • This section goes more into detail about the eco-system of digital badges, developing outcomes for your badges and their criteria.
  • Achievement name and short description and the criteria <br /> Identify specific outcomes that will be achieved and certified with badges <br /> Talk about potential values of badges? (what it means to earner, issuer, and third parties) <br /> <br /> We’ve already discussed that a digital badge is a visual representation but this image really shows the metadata fields that are embedded in every badge. As a creator, YOU are the person who creates this information for not only the earners, but other stakeholders who might be looking at the badges as proof that shows exactly what someone did to earn it. For those who are awarding badges, you need to come up with some of these fields, like the badge name, a short description of what it is, what activity the person did to earn that badge, and make sure that it ties into the general theme of your system. <br /> <br /> The metadata fields here are quite significant, this is what acts as a validator for the badge earner
  • For badge earners and other stakeholders, having a public space to display all the badges that you’ve earned helps with accountability and for the earner, a way to keep track of all their acheievements. This digital space stays with the badger earner
  • Once you have a general sense of the purpose of your badge system, you need to develop learning outcomes for what you want your users to gain from earning your badges. <br /> <br /> Your learning outcomes might be aligned with industry standards like the ACRL Info Lit Standards or Common Core, but for every badge in your system you will need to have an outcome that that specific badge as well. And remember that every single badge that is earned still has all of these other metadata fields attached to it, that tie back to the outcomes that you have set. <br /> <br /> Coming up with outcomes and mapping them to institutional goals is in my own experience, a big part of the design process for digital badges. <br /> <br /> Once you have a general sense of the purpose of your badge system, you need to develop learning outcomes for what you want your users to gain from earning your badges. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Your learning outcomes might be aligned with industry standards like the ACRL Info Lit Standards or Common Core, but for every badge in your system you will need to have an outcome that that specific badge as well. And remember that every single badge that is earned still has all of these other metadata fields attached to it, that tie back to the outcomes that you have set. <br /> <br /> Coming up with outcomes and mapping them to institutional goals is in my own experience, a big part of the design process for digital badges. Once you have a general sense of the purpose of your badge system, you need to develop learning outcomes for what you want your users to gain from earning your badges. <br /> <br /> Your learning outcomes might be aligned with industry standards like the ACRL Info Lit Standards or Common Core, but for every badge in your system you will need to have an outcome that that specific badge as well. And remember that every single badge that is earned still has all of these other metadata fields attached to it, that tie back to the outcomes that you have set. <br /> <br /> Coming up with outcomes and mapping them to institutional goals is in my own experience, a big part of the design process for digital badges. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Once you have a general sense of what you’d like to do with a badge system, it’s time to get more specific and develop a theme. What we mean by theme is creating a master plan for your entire system which might be comprised of many individual badges. When you are developing your outcomes for all your badges, if you keep your general theme in mind, your outcomes will be tied to each other. Example: in my own project, the general purpose of our badge system is tied to learning outcomes of the english composition class, and the first year library instruction program. <br /> <br /> Jonathan Finkelstein and Susan Manning, talk about themes by using the analogy of constellations, which I think is a good way to visual how you approach creating your own system. Every badge in your infrastructure should support your main outcomes. <br /> <br /> You also can determine a linear structure for badges, or not. <br /> <br /> Also when you are creating your theme, you need to consider which of your badges will be shared outwardly to Mozilla Backpack and what badges might be earned but stay in your system. If too much gets pushed out, it bloats the value of the badge. <br /> <br />
  • Choose one outcome within the standards that you would use that you would like to create a badge for and the criteria <br />
  • The next thing you’ll want to spend time considering with your badge is what kind of assessment to use. What is required of badge earners to receive a badge? How are you assessing what they do? What is the threshold for awarding a badge? <br /> <br /> Assessments should be aligned with the learning outcomes -- map learning outcomes to Blooms or other outcomes that you have identified; skills, knowledge, attitudes, etc. <br /> <br /> Badges are great in that they can reflect really granular and authentic assessments. Because you can attach evidence to badges, students can display these real life achievements via badges wherever they wish. They might share them on an eportfolio, social media, or other venues. They might also become part of a community. Something I’ve thought a lot about is how students or patrons or whoever is earning badges, can identify local experts. Let’s say you used badges for engagement with reading groups in public libraries, maybe there would be badges for the number of mysteries a person read, etc. Could a community around badges help a reader who is curious about mysteries and wanted to reach out to a reader of mysteries for a reading suggestion? <br /> <br /> In education I think the biggest and best power behind badges is the ability to assign more granular assessments to them. What exactly did students achieve? Instead of generally assessing student work with a grade for a course, smaller assessments can tell a student and her instructor what she is learning, and what she is missing.
  • Something to keep in mind as your design your own badge systems and badges... <br /> <br /> Based on Jessica Klein’s Badgemaking 101 presentation <br /> <br /> 1. Consider your audience <br /> What’s the age range? Are they college students? High school? The design of your badge should be appropriate to who you are trying to reach out to. Things to consider: colors (do they need to be tied to your institutional brand? <br /> <br /> 2. Badges and Identity <br /> 3. User Feedback <br /> 4. Reiterate <br /> <br /> <br /> Implementing your theme. Design principles? Colors? Shape? Fonts? <br />
  • 1. This is an example from a badge created in Credly, a website that allows you to design and directly award badges. It’s a potential design for one of the badges in my own project. This is not a badge that will be shared out in the open, it’s a badge that will stay in it’s system, and is linked to an activity where students do some library catalog searching for books, hence the term bookwork. Note: the design is pretty simple, so if you’re using credly, keep in mind that it’s a little limited if you just use the icons they provide. <br /> <br /> 2. This badge is from the Smithsonian. Here the iconography clearly reflects what the learning activity is, and the event. Telescope looking thing for astrophotograhpy and on the bottom, it also states the event. <br /> <br /> 3. The weed warrior badge is for volunteer’s for Outdoor Colorado. Somehow the color palette seems outdoorsy. Badge has image that reflects the activity (weed pulling) the year, and the name of the organization. Even without the metadata that would be associated with the badge, we can get a good sense of what the volunteer did to earn the badge just from looking at it. <br /> <br /> For a well designed badge, that’s what you want. An external reviewer should be able to glance at the badge, and have a general idea of

Dive into Digital Badges! A Badge Curriculum Workshop Dive into Digital Badges! A Badge Curriculum Workshop Presentation Transcript

  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Dive into Digital Badges! A Badge Curriculum Workshop #badgecurric Emily Ford, Urban and Public Affairs Librarian, Portland State University Nicole Pagowsky, Research & Instruction Librarian, University of Arizona Annie Pho, Resident Librarian, University of Illinois Chicago
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric A. Intro to Badges B. Creating Badges 1. Purpose, goals, structure 2. Outcomes, criteria 3. Assessment, evidence 4. Visual design, alignment C. Wrap-Up Agenda
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Quick Intro to Badges Background Information
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric What IS a badge, anyway? A badge is a visual representation of a skill, achievement, or knowledge gained.
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Intro. to Badges - Background flic.kr/p/5b5MGR
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3224/2653462361_9c725e 4dca_o.jpg
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Who is using badges? DMA Friends Program Educause Untappd
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric How are we using badges?
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Portland State University - Emily Website Evaluation Prof/ Pop/ In-between Contributor to Info Landscape Source Documentatio n Analysis of Info Learning Outcomes Core Badge Curriculum Undergraduate community Health classes Search Techniques
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric University of Arizona - Nicole LIBR Credit Course Research + Writing Tutor Training Library Information Literacy Institutional: General Education, Engagement, Retention
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric University of Illinois-Chicago - Annie First-Year Library Instruction Developing Incorporating Searching & Finding Evaluating
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Creating Badges Step 1 Purpose + Goals + Structure
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Image credit: carlacasilli.wordpress.com
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Image credit: http://blogs.cetis.ac.uk/
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Image credit: dmlcentral.net
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric “Gamification is an emergent approach to instruction which facilitates learning and encourages motivation through the use of game elements, mechanics and game- based thinking.” (Kapp, 2013)
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Image credit: zefcan.com
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Image credit: http://coral.ie.lehigh.edu/~frankecurtis/research ALA 2014 #badgecurric
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 1 Activity: 5 min Use the handout to brainstorm the following: 1. WHY: The goal or purpose for your badges 2. WHAT: The standards to align your badges with your audience 3. HOW: The overall badging structure
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Creating Badges Step 2 Outcomes + Criteria
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 2 - Achievements & Criteria What’s in a badge? Badge Name Description Criteria Issuer Evidence Date issued Standards Tags Photo credit: Badge anatomy. CC BY Kyle Bowen
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 2 - Showing off achievements Mozilla Backpack: online dashboard
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 2 - Mapping outcomes Badge Name Description Criteria Issuer Evidence Date issued Standards Tags Learning Outcomes
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 2 - Developing your theme . The Mega Badge
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 2 Activity: 10 min Use the handout to brainstorm the following: 1. WHY: The specific outcome for one badge 2. WHAT: The theme for your badge system 3. HOW: The criteria needed in order to earn the badge
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Creating Badges Step 3 Assessment + Evidence
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Creating Badges Step 3 - Assessments
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 3 Activity: 10 min Decide on what kind of assessment you’d like to use for your chosen badge, and what evidence should be sufficient for you to be able to award it.
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Creating Badges Step 4 Visual Design + Alignment
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Creating Badges Step 4 - Design 1. Consider your audience 2. Badges and Identity 3. User Feedback 4. Reiterate Process Cat Meme Expert
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 4 Creating Badges Don’t just put a logo on it.
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 4 Creating Badges Don’t just put a logo on it.
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 4 Creating Badges Examples:
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Step 4 Activity: 10 min Using the template on your handout, grab some markers and design your own badge! Take a photo of your design and tag it with #badgecurric!
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Wrap-Up
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric Your turn! Within 30-60 seconds… Tell us about your badge: ● What is it? ● Why did you make it? ● Who/what is it for? ● Any new insight? Image credit: miller-communications.com
  • ALA 2014 #badgecurric #badgecurric Emily Ford, Urban and Public Affairs Librarian, Portland State University @femilyr Nicole Pagowsky, Research & Instruction Librarian, University of Arizona @pumpedlibrarian Annie Pho, Resident Librarian, University of Illinois Chicago @catladylib