Re-thinking the MHS Library Media Center

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Presentation for contintuing to evolve our newly-renovated library.

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Re-thinking the MHS Library Media Center

  1. 1. Re-thinking the Library Media Center Re-thinking the MHS Library Media Center Diana Gardner, MHS Library Media Specialist “Investing in only 5% of the school’s real estate [the library]…has an impact on 100% of the students.” THE ROBIN HOOD FOUNDATION
  2. 2. Re-thinking the Library Media Center Re-thinking the Media Center “Schools with stronger school library programs average 10-20 % higher test scores. Keith Curry Lance, Ph.D. Director, Library Research Service Laura Bush Foundation
  3. 3. Re-thinking the Library Media Center Re-thinking the Media Center Today, an intellectual “hum” is the new “quiet.” Librarians function as instructors, coaches, teachers, and cheerleaders — while all around them students and teachers engage in multiple forms of learning. To spend a day in a contemporary school library is to witness what all the research says about quality education for the 21st century — educators and students engaged in research, collaboration, communication, problem solving, creativity, and more . (National Association of Independent Schools) . http://www.nais.org/Magazines-Newsletters/ISMagazine/Pages/The-New-School-Library.aspx
  4. 4. Re-thinking the Media Center This substantive shift to digital content will also change the requirements for the school library's physical space. Because the library is no longer warehousing the research collection itself, there is no need for a formal, quiet space. Library research can occur anywhere: in the classroom, at home, in quiet study areas throughout campus, and the library itself. School Library Monthly http://www.schoollibrarymonthly.com/articles/Corbett2011-v27n7p5.html
  5. 5. Digital Learning Space Evolving the Old School Library to a Digital Learning Space We have a very attractive space for the school media center; however, more and more, forward -thinking high schools in America are developing a hybrid school library or media center that incorporates traditional books, new digital technologies, and new modes of learning/teaching.
  6. 6. Re-thinking the Library Media Center Library Learning Commons I’ve chosen a model called the Library Learning Commons, a variation of what is happening started on many college campuses and now is spreading to a growing number of high schools.
  7. 7. Library Learning Commons What is the Library Learning Commons? • • • • • Physical and virtual space Welcoming and inviting student-centered environment Open, varied, and flexible collaborative space Point of access for resources and services, print AND electronic Center for state-of-the-art technology for research, coursework, and Project-Based Learning • Areas for professional development and whole-group instruction • Showcase of best teaching and learning practices • Heartbeat of the building, hub of student and staff activity
  8. 8. Purpose What does the Library Learning Commons accomplish? • Organizes library resources, collections, and technologies in one location—it is the place students and teachers know to go for anything related to knowledge and learning • Raises academic achievement school-wide by increasing and improving student use of traditional and non-traditional library resources • Promotes a love of reading through displays, programming, and a professionally-developed collection that includes high interest fiction and nonfiction for students and staff • Enriches the cultural life of the high school campus through exhibits, events, and other activities, connecting students with the greater local community and world. Adapted from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: “The Learning Commons: The Undergrad is Having an Extreme Makeover!” <http://www.library.uiuc.edu/ugl/lc/more.html> (April 22, 2009)
  9. 9. Specifics The Specifics An evolved media center is like a busy, six-lane highway, traffic in all lanes – all day long. Lane 1, iCommons: (Glassed-in conference room) Digital research and individual student work in a quiet, collaborative setting. Lane 2, Two Multi-use Computer Labs: – Multi-media instruction, Professional Development. Lane 3, Flex Zones: Resources and research, catalog, and online databases. Lane 4, Maker Space: individual and small group media creation/projects Lane 5, Information Station: Everyone’s first stop – manned with trained student staff. Lane 6, Conference Rooms: Dropshare Collaboration Tables connected to TV’s
  10. 10. iCommons Lane 1: iCommons Designated Area A: (Glassed-in conference room) Digital research and individual student work in a quiet, collaborative setting. • A beautiful space arranged to accommodate study needs of independent and small - group learners. • The place for students and teachers to work, read, or pursue new skills in information technology and literacy. • The place for students to research, create, problem-solve with support from media specialist and trained student ‘interns.’ • The place with hook-up for laptop computers. • A place with comfortable seating that can be put in a variety of configurations/arrangements.
  11. 11. iCommons Lane 1: iCommons Designated Area A: (Glassed-in conference room) Digital research and individual student work in a quiet, collaborative setting. • Bistro-style cafe seating • Collaborative Sprocket Table
  12. 12. Multi-use Computer Labs Whole Group Instruction/Professional Development An “open” computer lab - space arranged to provide everything a teacher needs to present a lesson with the latest of instructional technology. • Polyvision Boards – Update with sound bar. • Two, 30-station computer labs with media manipulation software programs. • Connection to each computer through the school network to the Internet. Each would include a CD-burner, and USB and firewire input/output with accompanying software to facilitate assembling and saving projects.
  13. 13. Lane 2: Multi-use Computer Labs Motion Tables • Designed with under-the-work-surface cable troughs and modesty panels that channel cords discreetly and out-of-sight from table to table. You can connect up to six tables per power plug.
  14. 14. Media-Center Computer Lab (Ben Davis)
  15. 15. Flex Zones Lane 3: Flex Zones Lane 3, Flex Zones: Resources and research, catalog, and online databases. • Use Current Computer Configurations – each side of circulation desk. • Moveable furniture for maximum flexibility • Low, flexible, mobile shelving as an option for part of the collection. • Computer furniture that includes an ample side work area adjacent to each computer. • Comfortable seating that can be put in a variety of configurations/arrangements. • Tables, both large and small, arranged to accommodate study needs of independent and small group learners.
  16. 16. Flex Zones Lane 3: Flex Zones Lane 3, Flex Zones: Resources and research, catalog, and online databases.
  17. 17. Maker Space Lane 4: Maker Space Designated Area B: "Innovation Zone" or “ Maker Space” A space arranged to provide everything students need to create projects – adjacent to the iCommons • Computer Workstations Currently in use– Updated with Creativity Software) • CollaborativeTables arranged to accommodate creation of projects • Open-source creativity software • Commercial creativity software • Office supplies (staplers, glue, paint, markers, etc.).
  18. 18. Lane 4: Maker Space Designated Area B: "Innovation Zone" or “ Maker Space”
  19. 19. Information Station Lane 5: Information Station • Everyone’s first stop – trained student staff • Digital displays for student work, upcoming events, latest acquisitions, etc. • Available for borrowing: (examples) • iPads or Tablets • iPod touches • Kindles • Laptops Theft-prevention system, placed relatively close to the circulation desk to provide for the most effective use of equipment. .
  20. 20. Conference Rooms Lane 6: Conference Rooms • Dropshare Media Table • Conferencing/collaborative work Get more out of our existing televisions with this special media table enhance small group learning. Team members can share multiple devices on one screen and students can embrace long-distance learning. With a small footprint and the integrated technology connectivity, these centers are critical tools for having people work together with today’s laptops and tablets.
  21. 21. Infrastructure Good News: We already HAVE most of this! ✓ Electrical system sufficient to accommodate current and future technological needs. Outlets need to be located throughout the facility at regular intervals. ✓ Wireless and wired technology infrastructure with a high bandwidth and the flexibility to accommodate a wide range of current and future technologies. Computer/data ports need to be located throughout the facility at regular intervals. ✓ Meets specific needs of various areas: circulation desk, online data bases, independent work stations, etc. ✓ Windows treated to screen ultraviolet light that could damage books and create excess heat.
  22. 22. Technology Digital Signage W list ish
  23. 23. NEW: offering collaborative workspaces for students and noise-cancelling headphones for those who want silence.
  24. 24. How Will This New Library Learning Commons Be Different From Our Current School Library? Old Model Librarians teach students how to find quality information New Model Librarians coach students in acquiring, creating, and sharing knowledge Librarians show students how to use technology to access databases Librarians, subject teachers and students explore the uses and implications of state-of-the- art technology Librarians are resources of information Librarians inspire learning Everyone must be quiet! Multiple, flexible spaces allow for a variety of simultaneous learning environments Areas defined by stacks, computers, and tables Changeable areas defined by affinity groups, classes, and subjects Books are stored in the stacks Entire collection is used every year Students assemble 2D projects on posterboard Students create multimedia presentations, borrowing from text, audio, video Students present projects to their class Students present projects to the public in the Learning Commons Separate sections devoted to digital information and print information QR Codes link print and non-print media by subject (Newton North Learning Commons)
  25. 25. Media Center Activities Media Center Qualities No Two Are the Same Large-group instruction Research Zones Reference Control Independent work areas Visibility Small group work areas Structured Learning Areas Informal reading Technology Learning Areas Production (e.g. video) Project-Based Learning Areas “The library of the future still is going to be an environment in which people can interact, they can work in small groups, and kids can learn to socialize with each other, to actively engage in learning.” Circulation Flexible/Moveable Furniture Administration (office) Technologically Integrated Displays/exhibit Learning Hub Doug Johnson, Director of Media and Technology Mankato (MN) School District.
  26. 26. “GIANT things are yet to come on our journey to become among the most consistently high-performing and innovative school communities in Indiana.” Brad Lindsay, MCS Superintendent MARION GIANTS VISION FOR VICTORY!

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