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Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston
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Project Management in the City of Boston: Alice Santiago, Director, Program Management Office, City of Boston

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  • With his business background and experience he understood the importance of a Program Management Office and brought invaluable knowledge to the City. After a few months the tool, Clarity, was ready and made available to MIS Staff
  • 1. Poor Project Planning and DirectionImproving project planning and direction is one of the key factors in IT project success. This requires a method made up of rules, processes and tools for project planning and management, supported by a software tool. It’s important to remember the Four Ps—pilot, phase, parallel and plunge—and, certainly, don’t plunge under any circumstance.A vital part of planning is to assign the right people to the right task and make clear assignments to team members, with defined goals and responsibilities. When assignments don’t work out, adjust roles as necessary.2. Insufficient CommunicationObjective status reports, frequent contact with sponsors and business users, and involvement of such external parties as the hardware vendor are crucial to avoiding the communication breakdowns that can derail IT projects.Simple actions matter, such as organized agendas, minutes, action items and information-push emails. Agendas force the project manager running the meeting to organize the time and supply preliminary materials. The thinking and preparation that goes into creating the agenda are more important than the agenda itself. Also, mix up the way the message is delivered, especially for executive reviews. Using the same status presentation repeatedly might be an efficient method, but it could also be missing necessary diversity to keep executives interested in the story behind the status.3. Ineffective ManagementSidestep this pitfall by proactively managing changing objectives, goals and risks, coordinating efforts between the technology and finance departments, and measuring performance.Implement a straightforward change-management process with estimating and approval steps. This should be a lightweight process, but one that also allows management to understand the impact of changing requirements on the project. Utilize a risk-management assessment tool to uncover risks that must be addressed during and after the project. Enlist a finance representative on the team and formalize a business case. Lastly, identify discrete performance measurements, like planned and actual task starts and completes, and include them in the status reporting.4. Failure to Align With Constituents and StakeholdersBuilding understanding and trust with constituents and stakeholders is essential to a successful outcome, particularly when these groups are in different organizations and might have varied measurements and motivations.For greater alignment, target specific initiatives to ensure interlock and communication with stakeholders. This can be done through input-gathering meetings, communication to push information and activities to get sign-offs on work products. Early in the IT project, it’s useful to have at least one face-to-face meeting with key stakeholders and team members. A well-planned kickoff meeting, where relationships are developed, will support the project in later months.5. Ineffective Involvement of Executive ManagementThe participation of an executive sponsor in key operational working sessions is crucial to establish priorities. Project kickoff is the best first meeting, but it doesn’t end there. Executive involvement must be targeted for specific status meetings to monitor project progress, particularly in meetings where go/no-go decisions must be solicited.6. Lack of Soft Skills or the Ability to AdaptTo prevent a situation in which team members lack the necessary skills for the project, utilize a mentoring approach for less-experienced employees. Also, include required education in the overall project schedule. Actively recruit skilled personnel through internal and external routes like jobs systems. A good outcome will not result without sufficiently skilled people.7. Poor or Missing Methodology and ToolsSuccessful projects are based on a methodology or framework that includes project-management tools. This approach can increase accuracy and save time by automating activities like task tracking.Maintaining a simple, organic methodology can have significant payback on a project. It should include the following:Set up an electronic project notebook.Establish written objectives for the project.Work with the technical lead to establish tasks within phases.Ask team members to estimate the time and number of tasks required.Create a formal project plan and manage to it, including basic change control.Proactively solve problems that may arise.Finding SuccessImproving the success rate of IT projects is possible by putting significantly more focus on general-management activities. It can be daunting at the onset of a project to know the odds indicate major retoolings or even outright failure. But with accurate planning, defined goals, clear assignments and effective communication, proactive managers can overcome those odds to master even the most challenging project.Simply knowing where potential pitfalls lie can help prevent backlogs and costly delays in the future.
  • Transcript

    • 1. You just need to have a plan
    • 2. Agenda: City of Boston’s Program Management Office What is a project? Project Statistics Why do Projects Fail? Project Success factors Project Management based on what? City of Boston Department Benefits What is your investment? Resources Q&A
    • 3. Pre-Program Management Office 2006 - 2007 2006: Mayor Menino hired Bill Oates from Starwood to become the City’s first CIO . Mr. Oates purchased CA Clarity to be used as the project management tool. 2007: Dave Nero contacted a number of people across the City to help configure the tool. 2008: Alice Santiago hired to create the City’s first Program Management Office. What is wrong with this picture?
    • 4. Program Management Office Established in 2008 @ DoIT Developed a flexible process for working on projects • Customize tools to facilitated project management • Create and deliver training • Provide resources to promote project management • Develop custom reporting on project management data
    • 5. What is a Project? A project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result. The temporary nature of projects indicates definite beginning and end. The end is reached when the project’s objectives have been achieved or when the project is terminated because it’s objectives will not or cannot be met, or when the need for the project no longer exists. Temporary does not necessarily mean short in duration. Temporary does not generally apply to the product, service ,or result created by the project, most projects are undertaken to create a lasting outcome.http://www.pmi.org
    • 6. Succeeded: Ontime, budget, all Standish Group Chaos Project Numbersrequirements metChallenged: Over budget 2011and/or delivered lateand/or fewer features 2009than requested 2006Failed: Cancelled or neverused once completed 2004 2002 2000 1998 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2009 2011 Succeeded 26% 28% 34% 29% 35% 32% 37% Challenged 46% 49% 51% 53% 46% 44% 42% Failed 28% 23% 15% 18% 19% 24% 21% http://blog.standishgroup.com/
    • 7. Look familiar? http://www.ibmsystemsmag.com/power/Systems-Management/Workload-Management/project_pitfalls/project_success_or_failure/Why do projects Fail?Project management (54%)Activities defining and controllingthe IT projectBusiness (21%)Aspects of the project dealing withproject funding, internal rate ofreturn and business dataPeople (14%)The team that carries out the ITprojectMethod (8%)The dimension involvingapproach, procedures and toolsTechnical (3%)Aspects of the project regardinghardware and software, testing andinterfaces between components http://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2009/12/52846-why-did-your-project-fail/comments
    • 8. Albert EinsteinInsanity: doing the same thingover and over again and expectingdifferent results.
    • 9. Project Management Success FactorsPM ResourceMethodologyConsistencyTool(s)Sponsor
    • 10. Project ManagementMethodology Phases
    • 11. City of Boston Project Management Approach 4.1 Develop 4.2 Develop 4.3 Direct and 4.6 CloseMethodology: Based on Project Project 5.1 Collect Manage Project or Charter Management Project Phaseindustry standard, Project Requirements Plan ExecutionManagement Body of Knowledge 5.2 Define Scope 5.3 Create(PMBOK 4, PMI) WBS 6.3 Estimate 6.1 Define Activity Breadth vs. Depth Activities Resources 6.2 Estimate 6.4 Sequence ActivityPhase 1 Activities Durations13 Steps across All Process 6.5 Develop 7.1 EstimateGroups Schedule Cost 9.3 Develop 9.2 Acquire Project TeamPhase 2 Project 9.4 Manage Team12 Steps In Planning and Project Team 10.2 Plan 10.3 DistributeExecuting 10.1 Identify Communicati Information Stakeholders ons 10.4 Manage StakeholderPhase 3 Expectations 11.2 IdentifyFocused Training (Human RisksResources, Quality, Risk, Cost, Change Control, etc.) 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 Plan Conduct Administer Close AS of 2010 32 out of 42 Steps covered Procurements Procurements Procurements Procurements
    • 12. DoIT Capital Funding$20,000,000.00$19,000,000.00$18,000,000.00$17,000,000.00$16,000,000.00$15,000,000.00$14,000,000.00$13,000,000.00$12,000,000.00$11,000,000.00$10,000,000.00 $9,000,000.00 $8,000,000.00 $7,000,000.00 $6,000,000.00 $5,000,000.00 $4,000,000.00 $3,000,000.00 $2,000,000.00 $1,000,000.00 $- 2007 2013 Capital Funding $2,750,000.00 $19,500,000.00
    • 13. Project Central
    • 14. PMO Center of Excellence Opened on October 3rd, 2011 Accommodates 61 people 3 Large conference rooms 3 Small conference rooms Kitchen and work room
    • 15. City Department BenefitsOutcomes Training• Capture all Project Work • Project Management I (15 hours)• Idea Approval Process • Project Management II (15 hours)• Project Approval Process • Project Communications (1 hour)• Reports from Clarity Data • Work Breakdown Structure (4 hours)• Resource Management • Workbench (8 hours)• Budget Plan • Stakeholder Identification and Analysis (1 hour) • Running Team Meetings (2 hours) • Status Reporting (3 Hours) • Risk and Issues Management (3 hours) • Lessons Learned (2 hours) • Project Shutdown (1.5 hours)Resources• Templates• Job Aids• Clarity Licenses• Project Consultation• Project Manager Mentoring• Project space at Project Central• City of Boston Project Management User Group
    • 16. Available to all City DepartmentsPM ResourceMethodologyTrainingTool(s)SpaceSponsor
    • 17. What is the investment?• Your time to customize the process• Your dedication to follow the process through• Dedicated time for training• Assigning Resource/Liaison to PMO• Cost for training, software, support?
    • 18. SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GRADUATE LEVEL PROGRAMS WHO MAY APPLY? Only full time City of Boston employees, in participating departments, are eligible for scholarship consideration.* Applicants must have been City employees for at least one year. Programs at the masters level and graduate level certificate programs at Boston University and Northeastern University may be covered by the scholarship program. HOW IS A SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED? Scholarships are awarded based upon (1)the needs of the City, (2) anticipated benefit to the City, (3) the employee’s record of on the job performance and potential. HOW DOES ONE APPLY? Applications for admission must be made directly to the graduate school of the applicants choice. Applications for scholarship must be received by July 1. If the applicant is accepted to the Scholarship Program, he/she will be notified between July 15 and August 1. Scholarship applications are available on the HUB under Document Library or by contacting Dana Webber at 617-635-2221. Contact: Dana.Webber@cityofboston.gov
    • 19. Resources Blog: http://pmo@cityofboston.gov Email: pmo@cityofboston.gov alice.santiago@cityofboston.gov http://pmi.org http://www.bu.edu/met/programs/graduate/project- management-certificate/ http://www.cps.neu.edu/degree- programs/graduate/graduate-certificates/certificate-in- project-management.php

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