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California
Local Energy Assurance Planning
(CaLEAP) Program
California Energy Commission
Energy Strategies Workshop
June 2...
2
Welcome
CaLEAP Overview
Energy Disruptions - Lessons Learned
Microgrid Fundamentals
– Case Studies
Implementation P...
3
Workshop Format
– Presentation and Interactive (Informal)
– Recorded
– WebEx protocols
Workshop Objective(s)
– Provide...
4
Partnership between CEC and Subcontractors
– Team Introductions
Voluntary Pilot program to Increase Energy Resiliency
...
5
Identifying projects/actions to ensure energy to “key
assets” needed to provide/sustain local government
essential servi...
6
Demonstrate how to:
– Prepare Energy Assurance Plans or
– Incorporate energy assurance in other planning efforts
Prese...
7
Incorporating Energy
– Expanded Planning Team
– Energy consideration
Local Awareness
– Energy Profile
– Hazards
Ident...
8
Driven by:
– Methodology
Input from:
– Advisory User Group
– Select Stakeholders
– Strategic Partners
Allows:
– Start...
9
 Group and one-on-one meetings
– In person and conference calls
 Workshops
 Subject matter experts
– Project Manageme...
10
Sept. 8, 2012 San Diego Outage
Energy Disruptions- Lessons Learned
 Power out to 7 million people in southern Californ...
11
April 2013 PG&E Substation Sabotage
Energy Disruptions- Lessons Learned
 Coordinated communications and transformer at...
12
Hurricane Irene
Energy Disruptions- Lessons Learned
 A Whole Foods market in Connecticut, the first grocery store in t...
13
Northridge Earthquake
Energy Disruptions- Lessons Learned
Key Lesson Learned
Worst case electric outages last for 4 wee...
15
Microgrid Fundamentals
“A microgrid is a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources within clearly
...
16
Case Study 1
Microgrid Provides Energy Resiliency
 In 2011, Connecticut utilities and regulators evaluated grid
harden...
18
Case Study 2
Fortune 25 Corporate Campus
Net Zero Facility
Implemented using best practice system engineering
methodo...
19
Microgrid Business Values
Achieve business continuity with a system that pays for itself and
supports environmental ste...
20
Renewable, Distributed Generation
Net Zero Energy Microgrid
21
Challenges of Distributed
Renewable Generation
 Fuel cells and solar PV systems present challenging control
issues dur...
22
Implementation Processes,
Technologies and Systems
Energy resiliency technologies
Implementation guidelines
Best pra...
23
Menu of Energy
Resiliency Technologies
GENERATION
• Rotating Machine
•Diesel, Gasoline, Propane
•Natural Gas
•Biogas
• ...
24
Menu of Energy
Resiliency Technologies
ENERGY
STORAGE
• Uninterruptible Power
Supply(UPS)
• Battery Energy Storage
(BES...
25
Guidelines on Component
Technologies Selection and Sizing
 Generator sizing and fuel options
 Distribution and facili...
27
Best Practice Development
for Resilient Systems
 Identification & prioritization of critical facilities and systems
– ...
28
Managing Green and
Legacy Retrofits
 Integrating renewable systems with legacy systems can be
costly if not designed a...
29
Grid Control and Monitoring
to Protect Critical Facilities
Tier 1: Emergency responders and medical facilities
– Use U...
30
Grid Control and monitoring
to protect critical facilities (cont.)
 Tier 2: Continuity of operations & communications
...
31
Potential Discussion Topics
Energy Assurance Challenges
Energy Infrastructure Issues
Energy Assurance Risk Managemen...
32
Facilitated Discussion
33
Work with Local Governments to complete plans
Exploring funding sources to implement projects
Identify sustained fun...
34
David Michel, CEC- Contract Manager
david.michel@energy.ca.gov
(916) 651-3747
Andy Petrow, ICF- Project Manager
andre...
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CaLEAP Energy Strategies Workshop June 25, 2013

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Transcript of "CaLEAP Energy Strategies Workshop June 25, 2013"

  1. 1. California Local Energy Assurance Planning (CaLEAP) Program California Energy Commission Energy Strategies Workshop June 24, 2013 (Irvine) June 25, 2013 (Oakland)
  2. 2. 2 Welcome CaLEAP Overview Energy Disruptions - Lessons Learned Microgrid Fundamentals – Case Studies Implementation Processes, Technologies and Systems Facilitated Discussion Next Steps Agenda
  3. 3. 3 Workshop Format – Presentation and Interactive (Informal) – Recorded – WebEx protocols Workshop Objective(s) – Provide update on CaLEAP program – Present  Cost-effective, advanced technology strategies  Business cases for implementation of strategies Welcome
  4. 4. 4 Partnership between CEC and Subcontractors – Team Introductions Voluntary Pilot program to Increase Energy Resiliency Builds on work done by DOE and others All hazards approach – Focus on effect; not cause Encourage comprehensive planning Leverages existing planning efforts CaLEAP Overview
  5. 5. 5 Identifying projects/actions to ensure energy to “key assets” needed to provide/sustain local government essential services in response to and recovery of emergencies CaLEAP Goal
  6. 6. 6 Demonstrate how to: – Prepare Energy Assurance Plans or – Incorporate energy assurance in other planning efforts Present new and evolving energy technologies Awareness of – Community Profile – Energy Profile – Hazards – Dependencies/Interdependencies – Assets Building public and private partnerships CaLEAP Objective
  7. 7. 7 Incorporating Energy – Expanded Planning Team – Energy consideration Local Awareness – Energy Profile – Hazards Identify Key Assets Assess Vulnerabilities Identifying Solutions – Actions/Projects CaLEAP- Methodology 4.EAP Implementation &Maintenance  Training  Exercises  Review& Update theEAP 3.Finalize EAP  EAPReview  EAPApproval  Adopt & Disseminate theEAP 2.DevelopYour EnergyAssurancePlan(EAP) 2a.Understand YourSituation  Present Community Profile Overview  BuildCommunity EnergyProfile  UnderstandYour Energy Interdependencies &Dependencies  BuildYour All Hazards Profile  UnderstandYour Emergency Framework  IdentifyKey Assets 2b.Identify Gaps  Assess Threats &Hazards  Determine Vulnerabilities  ValidateYour Situation(2a) 2c.Assemble Actions& Projects  Develop Specific EnergyAssurance Objectives  IdentifyActions &Projects  IdentifyActions &Projects Resources  PrioritizeActions &Projects 1.Form Your Team  DesignateEAP Coordinator  Identify EAP Working Group  CreateEAP Vision &Mission IncorporateintoandLeveragefromYourExisting Plans EAPUPDATES
  8. 8. 8 Driven by: – Methodology Input from: – Advisory User Group – Select Stakeholders – Strategic Partners Allows: – Start to finish or section by section – Import/Export of Data – Future expansion/enhancements – Virtual office/available via the web CaLEAP- Planning Tool
  9. 9. 9  Group and one-on-one meetings – In person and conference calls  Workshops  Subject matter experts – Project Management/Planning – Emergency Management – Current and Evolving Energy Technologies – Risk Assessment – Quality Assurance/Quality Control  Help identify public-private partnerships  LEAP document review Project website (www.caleap.org) CaLEAP- Technical Support
  10. 10. 10 Sept. 8, 2012 San Diego Outage Energy Disruptions- Lessons Learned  Power out to 7 million people in southern California, Baja and Arizona  Gridlock ensued minutes after the outage  70 elevator rescues, many people trapped for 3+ hours  Emergency communications overwhelmed in first 30-60 minutes  Scripps Mercy hospital without power for 90 minutes due to generator failure  Gas pumps inoperable without electricity Outage in Downtown San Diego Impact Summary • $100M in economic losses • 3.5 million gallon sewage spills • Schools and Universities closed the following day Key Lesson Learned Critical facilities and infrastructure should be identified, prioritized, and protected for resiliency
  11. 11. 11 April 2013 PG&E Substation Sabotage Energy Disruptions- Lessons Learned  Coordinated communications and transformer attack on grid backbone for Silicon Valley  First phase of attack cut 2 underground fiber optic communication lines  In Phase 2, multiple shooters targeted and hit 10 of 11 large 500 kV transformers  Surveillance cameras, buffer zone, access controls did not deter attackers Preliminary Impact Assessment • Confidential NERC alert issued • Knowledgeable attackers • Surveillance before attacks • Police response monitored • Critical substation targeted Key Lesson Learned Electric infrastructure at risk for physical and cyber attacks from knowledgeable attackers
  12. 12. 12 Hurricane Irene Energy Disruptions- Lessons Learned  A Whole Foods market in Connecticut, the first grocery store in the US to install a fuel cell, was able to keep its coolers running during Hurricane Irene.  Other stores followed suit, with Wal-Mart's 26 fuel cell installations, including those in Hemet and Lancaster, generating 65,000 MWhs of electricity annually Key Lesson Learned Distributed generation furthers local energy resiliency Hurricane Irene: Downed power lines
  13. 13. 13 Northridge Earthquake Energy Disruptions- Lessons Learned Key Lesson Learned Worst case electric outages last for 4 weeks. Gas and water restoration times are similar. • Northridge was a 6.7 magnitude earthquake ($20B in losses) • Shakeout is an estimate for a Los Angeles area 7.8 quake Source: Potential Impacts to Water and Electric Services from a M7.8 Southern San Andreas Earthquake. H. David Nahai, CEO and GM, LADWP
  14. 14. 15 Microgrid Fundamentals “A microgrid is a group of interconnected loads and distributed energy resources within clearly defined electrical boundaries that acts as a single controllable entity with respect to the grid. A microgrid can connect and disconnect from the grid to enable it to operate in both grid- connected or island-mode”  Microgrid Exchange Group Definition
  15. 15. 16 Case Study 1 Microgrid Provides Energy Resiliency  In 2011, Connecticut utilities and regulators evaluated grid hardening options following wide spread outages caused by Hurricane Irene and a severe snowstorm.  Options considered included microgrids with 1 or 2 generators, and undergrounding of electrical distribution lines  Business Case Results – No “one size all” solution – Cost effective solutions included:  Microgrids  Undergrounding of electric distribution lines  Multiple backup generators – Non-emergency use of generators key to cost effective solutions – Combined Heat and Power generators and non-emergency market sales may improve economics
  16. 16. 18 Case Study 2 Fortune 25 Corporate Campus Net Zero Facility Implemented using best practice system engineering methodology Thorough business cases (peak shaving; freq reg, etc.) Powered with 100% renewable energy (PV, biogas, etc.) Test Program Design and Implement RequirementsUse Cases
  17. 17. 19 Microgrid Business Values Achieve business continuity with a system that pays for itself and supports environmental stewardship  Net Zero Facilities • California Environmental Quality Act AB900 • Minimum 30% reduction in energy use • Minimum 35% reduction in water use • Reduce drive miles for employees  Revenue Opportunities • Peak load shaving reduces demand charge, lowers utility bill • Energy and ancillary services sold via CAISO markets • Resiliency lowers lost productivity during outages Microgrid System Balancing Generation Dispatch Switching Management Storage Dispatch Building Management SystemPower Quality Islanding Ancillary Services Demand Side Management Demand Response
  18. 18. 20 Renewable, Distributed Generation Net Zero Energy Microgrid
  19. 19. 21 Challenges of Distributed Renewable Generation  Fuel cells and solar PV systems present challenging control issues during electric grid failures  Problem: Unacceptable power quality during grid outages
  20. 20. 22 Implementation Processes, Technologies and Systems Energy resiliency technologies Implementation guidelines Best practices Managing green, resiliency and legacy retrofits Grid control and monitoring to protect critical facilities Cost Effectiveness Thorough Business Case Analysis (including social/private industry costs of outages)
  21. 21. 23 Menu of Energy Resiliency Technologies GENERATION • Rotating Machine •Diesel, Gasoline, Propane •Natural Gas •Biogas • Renewable •Solar Photovoltaic (PV) •Wind •Fuel Cells •Biogas •Natural gas (the new renewable) •Hydro & geothermal • Thermal •Combined Heat and Power (CHP) •Trigeneration (energy, heating and cooling) •Solar Water Heating CONTROLSYSTEMS • Building Automation and Control Systems • Environmental/HVAC Systems •Boilers •Fans •Heat Pumps • Smart Lighting • Microgrid Controllers •Transactive energy control •System Monitoring •Load-shedding/shifting • Bus transfer •Automated Electrical Sectionalizing Switchgear •Synchronizing switchgear
  22. 22. 24 Menu of Energy Resiliency Technologies ENERGY STORAGE • Uninterruptible Power Supply(UPS) • Battery Energy Storage (BES) systems • Thermal storage • Compressed Air • Flywheel • Fuel (diesel) & CNG for backup systems DemandSide Management • Demand Response • Load Reduction • Price Response • Energy Efficiency • Conservation
  23. 23. 25 Guidelines on Component Technologies Selection and Sizing  Generator sizing and fuel options  Distribution and facility electrical topology assessment  Business case considerations for individual buildings and communities – Annual peak load – Base load – Net controllable loads – Consider building heat, hot water and cooling needs & use of cogeneration to increase overall efficiency  Weather & Event Impact Scenarios  Risk Management & Spread Bets (e.g. fuel mix, supplies, storage)  Electricity Supply and Economics – Locational Marginal Price of energy – Fuel price and availability during disaster – Ability to sell power and ancillary services
  24. 24. 27 Best Practice Development for Resilient Systems  Identification & prioritization of critical facilities and systems – Emergency responders and medical facilities – Continuity of operations, communications – Social-economic continuity: Shelters, grocery stores, fuel stations, water supply, and sewer services  Weather & Disaster Scenarios (and cascading effects and “spreading your bets,” i.e., emergency vehicles mix of fuels)  Life cycle cost estimates to optimize economics based on stakeholder agreed to value assessments  Cradle to grave system engineering to manage complex systems and to ensure integrated, upgradable system  Project management office (PMO) with integrated cost, schedule and performance metrics  Effective risk management
  25. 25. 28 Managing Green and Legacy Retrofits  Integrating renewable systems with legacy systems can be costly if not designed and managed properly – Integration costs may exceed capital costs for hardware – Successful business cases demonstrate cost savings for resilient energy using renewable energy  Identify, prioritize, and geographically locate critical facilities – Consider microgrids for geographically co-located facilities – Consider distributed generation for more isolated facilities  Consider best mix of on-site generation including need for frequency control and load following during outages  Determine economic viability of distributed generation and storage  Model power system to identify control issues and power problems early
  26. 26. 29 Grid Control and Monitoring to Protect Critical Facilities Tier 1: Emergency responders and medical facilities – Use UPS to protect critical systems, e.g. 911 call system – Redundant power supply in addition to grid supplied power  Microgrid for co-located critical facilities  Or multiple generators (backup or distributed generation)  Bulk energy storage  Consider resiliency and economic benefits of on-site base load generator – Test on-site generation monthly – Test microgrid under simulated grid outage scenario at least annually (perhaps during an overall emergency preparedness exercise) and under varied scenarios
  27. 27. 30 Grid Control and monitoring to protect critical facilities (cont.)  Tier 2: Continuity of operations & communications – Use UPS’s to protect communications systems  Emergency radio, reverse 911 call system, web, email, text messages – Support systems necessary to mobilize recovery work force – If co-located near Tier 1 facilities consider microgrid  Tier 3: Social-economic continuity: Shelters, grocery stores, fuel stations, water supply, sewage, & business case inclusion – Keep people in the city during recovery, spending money locally, supporting local business – Encourage grocery stores and fuel stations to install on-site rotating generation, fuel cells or other distributed generation – Cite economic advantages, e.g. revenue generated during outages, food storage advantages, and customer service – Ensure all pumping stations have backup power generators, even those with 2 grid connections to protect against area-wide power outages – If co-located near Tier 1 facilities consider microgrid
  28. 28. 31 Potential Discussion Topics Energy Assurance Challenges Energy Infrastructure Issues Energy Assurance Risk Management Business Case Issues (including social costs) Role of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Political/Social Challenges that Influence Technical Choices Other Requirements – What do you need?
  29. 29. 32 Facilitated Discussion
  30. 30. 33 Work with Local Governments to complete plans Exploring funding sources to implement projects Identify sustained funding for continued support Provide Advanced Technical Support to some cities – Create an energy framework with incremental layers of detail for grid and infrastructure resiliency Next Steps
  31. 31. 34 David Michel, CEC- Contract Manager david.michel@energy.ca.gov (916) 651-3747 Andy Petrow, ICF- Project Manager andrew.petrow@icfi.com (818) 294-5472 Contacts
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