Why You Need a Service Experience Architecture (SEA) Practice
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Why You Need a Service Experience Architecture (SEA) Practice

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MX Conference 2013 ...

MX Conference 2013

Experience maps. Experience principles. Cross-channel scenario design. We’ve seen a rapid increase in investments by organizations to better understand their customers’ journeys and to conceptualize how to create more seamless and meaningful experiences across channels. This outside-in approach, however, will only take you so far. If your goal is to bring more cohesion to a system of customer touchpoints, you’re going to need to actively engage with the complex world of business processes, roles, and systems intended to support them. In this talk, Patrick shares his perspective on the value of service experience architecture (SEA), an emerging practice that aims to orchestrate multiple layers of service delivery to create better customer experiences.

Presented March 4, 2013

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Why You Need a Service Experience Architecture (SEA) Practice Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Good afternoon.Patrick T Quattlebaum | @ptquattlebaum
  • 2. Rail Europe Experience Map Guiding Principles People choose rail travel because it is Rail booking is only one part of people’s larger People build their travel plans over time. People value service that is respectful, effective convenient, easy, and flexible. travel process. and personable. Services are process Customer Journey STAGES Research & Planning Shopping Booking Post-Booking, Pre-Travel Travel Post Travel Enter trips Review fares Confirm Delivery Payment Review & Share experience RAIL EUROPE Research destinations, routes and products Wait for paper tickets to arrive Activities, unexpected changes Select pass(es) itinerary options options confirm Follow-up on refunds for booking changes Destination and experience- Look up Share pages Change Check ticket time tables E-ticket Print plans status photos at Station Get stamp Live chat for for refund Web raileurope.com questions Plan with Map itinerary interactive map (finding pass) Share experience May call if Buy additional (reviews) DOING tickets difficulties occur Kayak, View Blogs & web/ compare maps apps Travel sites Print e-tickets based. airfare at home Paper tickets Plan/ Web arrive in mail Look up confirm timetables Arrange Request Mail tickets Talk with activities Google Research refunds for refund friends travel searches hotels • What is the easiest way to get around Europe? • I want to get the best price, but I’m willing to pay a • Do I have all the tickets, passes and reservations • Do I have everything I need? • I just figured we could grab a train but there are • Trying to return ticket I was not able to use. Not • Where do I want to go? little more for first class. I need in this booking so I don’t pay more • Rail Europe website was easy and friendly, but not more trains. What can we do now? sure if I’ll get a refund or not. THINKING • How much time should I/we spend in each • How much will my whole trip cost me? What are my shipping? when an issue came up, I couldn’t get help. • Am I on the right train? If not, what next? • People are going to love these photos! place for site seeing and activities? trade-offs? • Rail Europe is not answering the phone. How • I want to make more travel plans. How do I • Next time, we will explore routes and availability • Are there other activities I can add to my plan? • What will I do if my tickets don’t arrive in time? else can I get my question answered? do that? more carefully. • I’m excited to go to Europe! • It’s hard to trust Trip Advisor. Everyone is • Website experience is easy and friendly! • Stressed that I’m about to leave the country • I am feeling vulnerable to be in an unknown place in • Excited to share my vacation story with • Will I be able to see everything I can? so negative. • Frustrated to not know sooner about which and Rail Europe won’t answer the phone. the middle of the night. my friends. • What if I can’t afford this? • Keeping track of all the different products tickets are eTickets and which are paper tickets. • Stressed that the train won’t arrive on time for my FEELING • Frustrated that Rail Europe won’t ship tickets connection. • A bit annoyed to be dealing with ticket refund • I don’t want to make the wrong choice. is confusing. Not sure my tickets will arrive in time. to Europe. • Meeting people who want to show us around is fun, issues when I just got home. • Am I sure this is the trip I want to take? • Happy to receive my tickets in the mail! serendipitous, and special. Enjoyability Enjoyability Enjoyability Enjoyability Enjoyability Enjoyability EXPERIENCE Relevance of Rail Europe Relevance of Rail Europe Relevance of Rail Europe Relevance of Rail Europe Relevance of Rail Europe Relevance of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Opportunities GLOBAL PLANNING, SHOPPING, BOOKING POST-BOOK, TRAVEL, POST-TRAVEL Communicate a clear value Help people get the help they Support people in creating their Enable people to plan over time. Visualize the trip for planning Arm customers with information Improve the paper ticket Accommodate planning and proposition. need. own solutions. and booking. for making decisions. experience. booking in Europe too. STAGE: Initial visit STAGES: Global STAGES: Global STAGES: Planning, Shopping STAGES: Planning, Shopping STAGES: Shopping, Booking STAGES: Post-Booking, Travel, Post-Travel STAGE: Traveling Make your customers into better, Engage in social media with Connect planning, shopping and Aggregate shipping with a Proactively help people deal Communicate status clearly at more savvy travelers. explicit purposes. booking on the web. reasonable timeline. with change. all times. STAGES: Global STAGES: Global STAGES: Planning, Shopping, Booking STAGE: Booking STAGES: Post-Booking, Traveling STAGES: Post-Booking, Post Travel Information Stakeholder interviews Customer Experience Survey Ongoing, Linear Non-linear, but non-linear process time based sources Cognitive walkthroughs Existing Rail Europe Documentation Experience Map for Rail Europe | August 2011Last year at MX, Todd Wilkens and Chirs Risdon talked a lot about experience maps and customer journey maps on our blog and at events. In fact, Chris Risdon from our Austin studio hasmade a nice little cottage industry going around the world teaching practitioners how to do mapping within their organizations.
  • 3. Rail Europe Experience Map Guiding Principles People choose rail travel because it is Rail booking is only one part of people’s larger People build their travel plans over time. People value service that is respectful, effective convenient, easy, and flexible. travel process. and personable. Services are process Customer Journey STAGES Research & Planning Shopping Booking Post-Booking, Pre-Travel Travel Post Travel Enter trips Review fares Confirm Delivery Payment Review & Share experience RAIL EUROPE Research destinations, routes and products Wait for paper tickets to arrive Activities, unexpected changes Select pass(es) itinerary options options confirm Follow-up on refunds for booking changes Destination and experience- Look up Share pages Change Check ticket time tables E-ticket Print plans status photos at Station Get stamp Live chat for for refund Web raileurope.com questions Plan with Map itinerary interactive map (finding pass) Share experience May call if Buy additional (reviews) DOING tickets difficulties occur Kayak, View Blogs & web/ compare maps apps Travel sites Print e-tickets based. airfare at home Paper tickets Plan/ Web arrive in mail Look up confirm timetables Arrange Request Mail tickets Talk with activities Google Research refunds for refund friends travel searches hotels • What is the easiest way to get around Europe? • I want to get the best price, but I’m willing to pay a • Do I have all the tickets, passes and reservations • Do I have everything I need? • I just figured we could grab a train but there are • Trying to return ticket I was not able to use. Not • Where do I want to go? little more for first class. I need in this booking so I don’t pay more • Rail Europe website was easy and friendly, but not more trains. What can we do now? sure if I’ll get a refund or not. THINKING • How much time should I/we spend in each • How much will my whole trip cost me? What are my shipping? when an issue came up, I couldn’t get help. • Am I on the right train? If not, what next? • People are going to love these photos! place for site seeing and activities? trade-offs? • Rail Europe is not answering the phone. How • I want to make more travel plans. How do I • Next time, we will explore routes and availability Experience • Are there other activities I can add to my plan? • What will I do if my tickets don’t arrive in time? else can I get my question answered? do that? more carefully. • I’m excited to go to Europe! • It’s hard to trust Trip Advisor. Everyone is • Website experience is easy and friendly! • Stressed that I’m about to leave the country • I am feeling vulnerable to be in an unknown place in • Excited to share my vacation story with • Will I be able to see everything I can? so negative. • Frustrated to not know sooner about which and Rail Europe won’t answer the phone. the middle of the night. my friends. • What if I can’t afford this? • Keeping track of all the different products tickets are eTickets and which are paper tickets. • Stressed that the train won’t arrive on time for my FEELING • Frustrated that Rail Europe won’t ship tickets connection. • A bit annoyed to be dealing with ticket refund • I don’t want to make the wrong choice. is confusing. Not sure my tickets will arrive in time. to Europe. • Meeting people who want to show us around is fun, issues when I just got home. • Am I sure this is the trip I want to take? • Happy to receive my tickets in the mail! serendipitous, and special. EXPERIENCE Opportunities Enjoyability Relevance of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Mapping! Enjoyability Relevance of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Enjoyability Relevance of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Enjoyability Relevance of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Enjoyability Relevance of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe Enjoyability Relevance of Rail Europe Helpfulness of Rail Europe GLOBAL PLANNING, SHOPPING, BOOKING POST-BOOK, TRAVEL, POST-TRAVEL Communicate a clear value Help people get the help they Support people in creating their Enable people to plan over time. Visualize the trip for planning Arm customers with information Improve the paper ticket Accommodate planning and proposition. need. own solutions. and booking. for making decisions. experience. booking in Europe too. STAGE: Initial visit STAGES: Global STAGES: Global STAGES: Planning, Shopping STAGES: Planning, Shopping STAGES: Shopping, Booking STAGES: Post-Booking, Travel, Post-Travel STAGE: Traveling Make your customers into better, Engage in social media with Connect planning, shopping and Aggregate shipping with a Proactively help people deal Communicate status clearly at more savvy travelers. explicit purposes. booking on the web. reasonable timeline. with change. all times. STAGES: Global STAGES: Global STAGES: Planning, Shopping, Booking STAGE: Booking STAGES: Post-Booking, Traveling STAGES: Post-Booking, Post Travel Information Stakeholder interviews Customer Experience Survey Ongoing, Linear Non-linear, but non-linear process time based sources Cognitive walkthroughs Existing Rail Europe Documentation Experience Map for Rail Europe | August 2011Last year at MX, Todd Wilkens and Chirs Risdon talked a lot about experience maps and customer journey maps on our blog and at events. In fact, Chris Risdon from our Austin studio hasmade a nice little cottage industry going around the world teaching practitioners how to do mapping within their organizations.
  • 4. Customer journey maps Ideation (lots of methods) Service storming & roleplaying Storyboards & snapshots Service blueprints Service roadmapsBut experience maps are only one of many new tools weve been adding to or evolving in our practice in the last couple of years. Many of them come from the emerging discipline of servicedesign. Weve been experimenting with how to make these tools more effective in solving complex design problems involving multiple channels, touch points, and media.
  • 5. Borrowed from Brandon SchauerOne the tools weve been using more and more in our work is service blueprinting. Which details the flow of interactions a customer has with front stage touch points and the systems ofpeople and processes that sit behind the scenes to support those touch points. A blueprint is an operational tool that describes the nature and the characteristics of the service interaction inenough detail to verify, implement, and maintain it.
  • 6. Why service blueprints?After creating several blueprints and teaching the method to hundreds of people, weve been reflecting on where this this technique fits in the greater scheme of things, whats the potential ofblueprints to help organizations design and deliver better customer experiences.
  • 7. Why you need a Service Experience Architecture (SEA) Practice Patrick Quattlebaum | @ptquattlebaumSo, Id like to use my 20 minutes today to talk about why you should add service blueprinting to your organizations tool box and how this method could help address common issues inmoving from vision to reality.
  • 8. Process http://www.salespodder.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/sheldon-cooper-finding-a-friend-flow-chart.jpgWhen talking about service experience architecture and service blueprints, i’m going to have to talk a lot about process. We talk a lot about design process at conferences like this, but whatI’m referring to are business processes.
  • 9. Services are process and experience based. From Service Blueprinting: A Practical Technique for Service InnovationAnd that’s because, unlike products, services are created in real-time and process and experience based by their very nature.
  • 10. procès (13c.) http://panathinaeos.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/seventh_seal_14.jpgInterestingly, when you trace the etymology of "process," you find that it derives from the Old French term "proces," which translates most closely to "journey." This picture depicts a scene from the Seventh Seal in which a groupof travelers is taken away to the afterworld by Death. Their process of dying is more spiritual than biological, more intangible than tangible.
  • 11. procès (13c.) a journey http://panathinaeos.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/seventh_seal_14.jpgInterestingly, when you trace the etymology of "process," you find that it derives from the Old French term "proces," which translates most closely to "journey." This picture depicts a scene from the Seventh Seal in which a groupof travelers is taken away to the afterworld by Death. Their process of dying is more spiritual than biological, more intangible than tangible.
  • 12. process (17c.) http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Anatomia_xiv_secolo.jpg/897px-Anatomia_xiv_secolo.jpgWith the end of the middle ages and the rise of the scientific revolution, the definition evolved to this definition: "a continuous series of actions meant to accomplish some result." For example, the study of human body wasrevealing how different parts of ones anatomy worked as a system and how the system could fail.
  • 13. process (17c.) a continuous series of actions meant to accomplish some result http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/Anatomia_xiv_secolo.jpg/897px-Anatomia_xiv_secolo.jpgWith the end of the middle ages and the rise of the scientific revolution, the definition evolved to this definition: "a continuous series of actions meant to accomplish some result." For example, the study of human body wasrevealing how different parts of ones anatomy worked as a system and how the system could fail.
  • 14. process (20c.) source: http://www.doctormacro.com/Images/Chaplin,%20Charlie/Annex/Annex%20-%20Chaplin,%20Charlie%20(Modern%20Times)_01.jpgAnd then from the industrial revolution, through Taylorism and Fordism in the 20th century and on to today, “process” within business, government, and other institutions that shape our lives. The mechanization of work hasmoved us all further from our humanist roots to actors in complex systems of processes and information.
  • 15. process (20c.) a sequence of interdependent and linked procedures which, at every stage, consume one or more resources (employee time, energy, machines, money) to convert inputs (data, material, parts, etc.) into outputs. These outputs then serve as inputs for the next stage until a known goal or end result is reached. source: http://www.doctormacro.com/Images/Chaplin,%20Charlie/Annex/Annex%20-%20Chaplin,%20Charlie%20(Modern%20Times)_01.jpgAnd then from the industrial revolution, through Taylorism and Fordism in the 20th century and on to today, “process” within business, government, and other institutions that shape our lives. The mechanization of work hasmoved us all further from our humanist roots to actors in complex systems of processes and information.
  • 16. process (20c.) a sequence of interdependent and linked procedures which, at every stage, consume one or more resources (employee time, energy, machines, money) to convert inputs (data, material, parts, etc.) into outputs. These outputs then serve as inputs for the next stage until a known goal or end result is reached. source: http://www.doctormacro.com/Images/Chaplin,%20Charlie/Annex/Annex%20-%20Chaplin,%20Charlie%20(Modern%20Times)_01.jpgAnd then from the industrial revolution, through Taylorism and Fordism in the 20th century and on to today, “process” within business, government, and other institutions that shape our lives. The mechanization of work hasmoved us all further from our humanist roots to actors in complex systems of processes and information.
  • 17. Rational Irrational Engagement http://www.morethings.com/fan/bill_murray/stripes/bill_murray-stripes1981-1325.jpg http://www.soundonsight.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Brazil.jpg
  • 18. What have we built? http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m970z4Gotv1qzcgluo1_1280.jpg
  • 19. http://www.morethings.com/fan/bill_murray/stripes/bill_murray-stripes1981-1325.jpgBusiness and technology leaders have become enamored with the toyota production system and its spin offs - lean manufacturing, Six Sigma, and so on.
  • 20. Lean, mean, fightin’ machine! http://www.morethings.com/fan/bill_murray/stripes/bill_murray-stripes1981-1325.jpgBusiness and technology leaders have become enamored with the toyota production system and its spin offs - lean manufacturing, Six Sigma, and so on.
  • 21. Optimize processes to reduce waste and focus on activities that directly deliver customer value.The stated goal behind lean and other methodologies find and remove any elements of the production system that are not creating value for the customer.
  • 22. Common Process Design Methods Value Stream Mapping Business Process Mapping http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgTo achieve this aim, roles such as business architects and business process architects have been growing in large corporations. They do their own kind of mapping and blueprinting to visualize processes, identify areas ofweakness, and then propose new process designs to make the system more efficient. Value stream mapping, in particular, is an approach used in many service industries, such as healthcare, to redesign processes that directlyinterface with customers across many channels.
  • 23. Business Strategy Business Architecture Tactical Execution http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgAll of this work is part of the activities of the business architecture layer in large organizations. Business architecture is essentially operational planning and design, and it is intended to connect strategy to tactics.
  • 24. Principles Process Design Service Delivery http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgIf you read the literature on business architecture and watch it in action, you see pretty quickly that this, in many ways, is where the action is if you are looking to affect the quality of product and services in an organization.Process design takes the strategic principles as an input and then puts an architecture in place for tactical delivery. Decisions at this level create constraints at the tactical level. And that’s where many design organizations getinvolved in the conversation.
  • 25. Applying industrial methods to service design and delivery is problematic.Now, this is not a Lean bashing presentation. There are benefits in reducing waste, and many case studies showing this in practice. In trying to create better customer experiences with the larger organizations I have workedwith , however, there are issues in how value stream mapping and business process mapping are employed in service organizations.
  • 26. Different Perspectives Industrial Production Service Delivery Tangible Intangible Technology-focused Human-centered Efficiency Experience Linear Non-linear Standards Principles Adapted from This is Service Design ThinkingWe’re dealing with a perspective from manufacturing not suited for service design and delivery...
  • 27. Different Definitions of Value Business Customer Customer satisfaction How is it useful to me? Revenue growth Does it provide me with Profitability personal satisfaction? Market share What benefits does it Wallet share provide me? Cross-sell ratio Does it provide the level of quality I expect or desire? NPS Does it align with my beliefs Relationship duration and world view?.. and we have competing values that make myopic views of value dangerous when approaches like value stream mapping are applied to service and customer experience.
  • 28. Humanize processes to co-create value for businesses and the people with whom they interact.But the biggest, most self serving, issue that I see is business processes are designed without designers. Which is really just a short-hand way of saving, designers need to help organizations design better processes towards thegoal of creating better customer experiences.
  • 29. service blueprintingWhich finally brings us back to service blueprinting.
  • 30. Service blueprinting helps designers engage operations to go from vision to reality.As both an activity and an artifact, service blueprinting’s main value is that its helps those of us passionate about creating better customer experiences engage with the disciplines that are building the architectures upon whichour products and services depend upon.
  • 31. 134 Harvard Business Review January-February 1984 Exhibit I Blueprint for a comer shoeshine StarKlard Brush execution time shoes 2 minutes Total acceptable execution time 5 minutes Une of Faciiitating services vialblllty and products Not seen Select by customer and purchase but necessary supplies to perfonnance There are several reasons for the lack of Good and lasting service management requires muc h analytical service systems designs. Services are more. Better service design provides the key to market unusual in that they have impact, but no form. Like success, and more important, to growth. light, they cant he physically stored or possessed and The operations side of service manage-Service blueprints have been around for over 30 years. Lynda Shostack began writing about them in the early 80s and created this example of a shoe shine service to illustrate the value that blueprints can bring: making intangible thei tangible. Much of Shostack’s blueprint is focused on execution time ofwith theishoeshiner. What you don’toftesense of is what thek flow isdesign and controlare performed.services morer con sum ptio n is often simultaneous the tasks by the r ment get a n uses wor experience for the customer as these tasks methods production. such as time-motion engine
  • 32. Photo by Joe Mabel, http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a7/San_Francisco_-_Famous_Waynes_shoeshine_02.jpgFor example, with San Francisco’s Famous Wayne, you get your shoes shined, but you get a lot more than that.
  • 33. Nothing nonverbally communicates "megaballer" like sitting on a throne in the Financial District and having the sh#$ shined out of your shoes in front of everybody. - Kevin L., Yelper Photo by Joe Mabel, http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a7/San_Francisco_-_Famous_Waynes_shoeshine_02.jpgFor example, with San Francisco’s Famous Wayne, you get your shoes shined, but you get a lot more than that.
  • 34. http://blog.modernmechanix.com/mags/PopularScience/10-1937/shoe_shine_merry_go_round.jpgHere’s another shoe-shining experience which focuses on efficiency while still trying to have a unique experience.
  • 35. http://www.jetsetzero.tv/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/P1010270.jpgAnd here’s an experience where people have been removed from the service all together. Same steps, different experience.
  • 36. Service Blueprint of Presby Neuro Clinic PHYSICAL Front Waiting Front Waiting Front Hallway Exam MRI & Exam MRI & Door Tag Waiting Check-out EVIDENCE Desk Room Desk Room Desk Room Chart Room Chart Room Room Check-out, PATIENT Sign In Wait Check-in Wait Responds Follow to Wait in Answer Wait Ask Return Wait Pay, & ACTIONS Exam Rm Exam Rm Questions Questions Door Tag Leave Line of Interaction ? ? ? ? ? ONSTAGE Call Escort to Check Meet Dr. Process & CONTACT Welcome Process Patient Exam Rm Vitals & Kassam Check-out Ask Quest PERSON Line of Visibility BACKSTAGE Get See Other Grab Check Place in Take See Other See Other See Other CONTACT Patient Patients Patients Door Tag Patients Patient Kassam Away Patients PERSON Chart Location Bin Chart Brings Chart in Grab Kassam Door Tag To Be Chart Gets Quick Back Seen Bin from Bin Review Chart Write Rm Check Taken by # on Patient Dictation Staff Schedule Location Line of Internal Interaction SUPPORT Records/ Bin Chart Records/ Debbie’s Door Tag Schedule Database Database System Storage PROCESSES Chart Cart System System System System System Work by CMU students: Melissa Cliver, Jamin Hegeman, Kipum Lee, Leanne Libert, Kara TennantSo as designers have gotten their hands on blueprints, they have become mush more focused on the customers role in their own service experiences while not losing the original intent ofshowing how different front stage and back stage activities and processes co-create the service experience.
  • 37. Blueprint Building Blocks Borrowed from Jamin HegemanIf you were able to take Jamin workshop of service blueprinting, you learned that we start with the customers actions and then detail what touchpoints, staff actions, back stage actions,processes and technologies map to those actions. Blueprinting is informed by customer journey mapping, ideation, and other outside-in techniques, but blueprinting is where we’re looking atoperational impact and determining how to bring to life the experiences customers value.
  • 38. Blueprint Building Blocks Customer Actions Borrowed from Jamin HegemanIf you were able to take Jamin workshop of service blueprinting, you learned that we start with the customers actions and then detail what touchpoints, staff actions, back stage actions,processes and technologies map to those actions. Blueprinting is informed by customer journey mapping, ideation, and other outside-in techniques, but blueprinting is where we’re looking atoperational impact and determining how to bring to life the experiences customers value.
  • 39. Blueprint Building Blocks Customer Actions Touchpoints Borrowed from Jamin HegemanIf you were able to take Jamin workshop of service blueprinting, you learned that we start with the customers actions and then detail what touchpoints, staff actions, back stage actions,processes and technologies map to those actions. Blueprinting is informed by customer journey mapping, ideation, and other outside-in techniques, but blueprinting is where we’re looking atoperational impact and determining how to bring to life the experiences customers value.
  • 40. Blueprint Building Blocks Customer Actions Touchpoints Staff Actions Borrowed from Jamin HegemanIf you were able to take Jamin workshop of service blueprinting, you learned that we start with the customers actions and then detail what touchpoints, staff actions, back stage actions,processes and technologies map to those actions. Blueprinting is informed by customer journey mapping, ideation, and other outside-in techniques, but blueprinting is where we’re looking atoperational impact and determining how to bring to life the experiences customers value.
  • 41. Blueprint Building Blocks Customer Actions Touchpoints Staff Actions Line of Visibility Borrowed from Jamin HegemanIf you were able to take Jamin workshop of service blueprinting, you learned that we start with the customers actions and then detail what touchpoints, staff actions, back stage actions,processes and technologies map to those actions. Blueprinting is informed by customer journey mapping, ideation, and other outside-in techniques, but blueprinting is where we’re looking atoperational impact and determining how to bring to life the experiences customers value.
  • 42. Blueprint Building Blocks Customer Actions Touchpoints Staff Actions Line of Visibility Back Stage Staff Borrowed from Jamin HegemanIf you were able to take Jamin workshop of service blueprinting, you learned that we start with the customers actions and then detail what touchpoints, staff actions, back stage actions,processes and technologies map to those actions. Blueprinting is informed by customer journey mapping, ideation, and other outside-in techniques, but blueprinting is where we’re looking atoperational impact and determining how to bring to life the experiences customers value.
  • 43. Blueprint Building Blocks Customer Actions Touchpoints Staff Actions Line of Visibility Back Stage Staff Support Processes Borrowed from Jamin HegemanIf you were able to take Jamin workshop of service blueprinting, you learned that we start with the customers actions and then detail what touchpoints, staff actions, back stage actions,processes and technologies map to those actions. Blueprinting is informed by customer journey mapping, ideation, and other outside-in techniques, but blueprinting is where we’re looking atoperational impact and determining how to bring to life the experiences customers value.
  • 44. Blueprint Building Blocks Customer Actions Touchpoints Staff Actions Line of Visibility Back Stage Staff Support Processes Time Borrowed from Jamin HegemanIf you were able to take Jamin workshop of service blueprinting, you learned that we start with the customers actions and then detail what touchpoints, staff actions, back stage actions,processes and technologies map to those actions. Blueprinting is informed by customer journey mapping, ideation, and other outside-in techniques, but blueprinting is where we’re looking atoperational impact and determining how to bring to life the experiences customers value.
  • 45. Benefits of Service Blueprinting Prototype of the future experience Provides low fidelity version of the service experience: great for ideation Visualizes vision of the service experience Strategic tool for project planning Helps see where and how existing and future ideas fit with the envisioned experience Combination of customer experience with an operational tool Helps design and engineering speak the same language Borrowed from Jamin HegemanWe’ve seen many benefits for blueprints in our work in both service design and in cross-channel design. In combination with storyboarding, acting, and other techniques, we are able toexplore options for the service experience and then document it for others to understand. We do this collaboratively with business stakeholders, process engineers, employees on the frontline and behind the line of visibility. It has been proven to be very effective in moving from idea to action without losing the human-centered strategies that precede execution.
  • 46. the future?So, based on using blueprinting in my practice before coming to AP and in the last year, here’s what I hope the future looks like...
  • 47. Service blueprinting becomes a core tool used within a new enterprise capability.Service blueprinting gets great feedback and results from all sorts of disciplines, and within process engineering, the tools is popping up in many companies.
  • 48. Service Experience Architecture (SEA)But I’d like to see designers push harder into the operational layer of companies, 80% of whom are part of the service industry. I’ve given this idea a name, which is Service ExperienceArchitecture.
  • 49. Another architecture?!? Enterprise (EA) Business (BA) Service-oriented (SOA) Business process (BPA) Information (IA)I know, I know. Another architecture in companies with too many planning disciplines.
  • 50. Business Strategy Business Architecture Tactical Execution http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgWe’ve been talking about bringing design to the strategy level in the form of experience strategy for years, and of course user-centered design has traditionally focused on the design ofindividual touchpoints and interfaces.
  • 51. Business Strategy Experience Strategy Business Architecture Tactical Tactical Development Design http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgBut designers need to go there. Again, that’s where the action is. It fills a gap in our journey to bring design into all layers of the enterprise process of strategy to planning to execution.
  • 52. Business Strategy Experience Strategy Business Service Experience Architecture Architecture Tactical Tactical Development Design http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgService blueprinting is one approach to a practice focused on the planning layer. It would engage with business architects in how to shape the operations of a company to balance efficiencyand great customer experience.
  • 53. Customer Journey Maps Business Strategy Experience Strategy Business Service Experience Architecture Architecture Tactical Tactical Development Design http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgService blueprinting is one approach to a practice focused on the planning layer. It would engage with business architects in how to shape the operations of a company to balance efficiencyand great customer experience.
  • 54. Customer Journey Maps Business Strategy Experience Strategy Experience Principles & Service Concepts Business Service Experience Architecture Architecture Tactical Tactical Development Design http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgService blueprinting is one approach to a practice focused on the planning layer. It would engage with business architects in how to shape the operations of a company to balance efficiencyand great customer experience.
  • 55. Customer Journey Maps Business Strategy Experience Strategy Experience Principles & Service Concepts Business Service Experience Architecture Architecture Service Blueprints Tactical Tactical Development Design http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgService blueprinting is one approach to a practice focused on the planning layer. It would engage with business architects in how to shape the operations of a company to balance efficiencyand great customer experience.
  • 56. Customer Journey Maps Business Strategy Experience Strategy Experience Principles & Service Concepts Business Service Experience Architecture Architecture Service Blueprints Tactical Tactical Development Design More Valuable Service Experiences http://images.flatworldknowledge.com/cadden/cadden-fig13_005.jpgService blueprinting is one approach to a practice focused on the planning layer. It would engage with business architects in how to shape the operations of a company to balance efficiencyand great customer experience.
  • 57. SEA could include... Formally evaluating current service delivery Facilitating service blueprinting Prototyping and piloting operational changes Creating service roadmapsThis practice could include activities like...
  • 58. process (21c.)And engaging at the operational layer, my hope is that we can evolve the meaning of process in the 21st century business.
  • 59. process (21c.) orchestrated series of interrelated actions that produce sustainable value for all stakeholders in complex ecosystems of people, products, services, and technologiesAnd engaging at the operational layer, my hope is that we can evolve the meaning of process in the 21st century business.
  • 60. but for now...But practically speaking...
  • 61. Service blueprinting is an effective way to prototype service experiences and engage operations.I encourage you to consider adding blueprinting to your organizations toolkit.
  • 62. Consider Using service blueprinting on multi- touchpoint, cross-channel initiatives Coupling service blueprints with customer journey maps (look backstage) Spending time with process engineers Trying cross-functional pilot projects that gets the customer into process designMore specifically, you should consider...
  • 63. It’s about workinginside and acrossyour organizationsto humanize serviceexperiences ...
  • 64. ... and, in doing so,your organizationsthemselves.
  • 65. Thanks for your time.Patrick T Quattlebaum | @ptquattlebaum www.romantic-jewels.com Shoe Shine.jpg