FEBRUARY 2013 UPDATETHE PORTS-TO-PLAINS ALLIANCE“A Corridor of National Significance”
INTRODUCTIONThe Ports-to-Plains Alliance is a non-profit, non-partisan, community-driven advocacy group led bymayors, coun...
A STRONG FEDERAL ROLEThe Ports-to-Plains Alliance supports modernizing our Nation’s surface transportation network,includi...
MAP-21The Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) (PublicLaw 112-141) was signed into law by President ...
TRANSPORTATION’S FUNDING SHORTFALLWhile MAP-21 addressed significant transportation policy issues, it did not address the ...
•   Through partners, we are three Congressionally-designated, north-south High Priority Corridors,    comprising 2,333 mi...
PORTS-TO-PLAINS CORRIDOR NOT JUST A HIGHWAY                       Ports-to-Plains: North America’s Energy CorridorTop 6 Na...
MISSION STATEMENTPorts-to-Plains is a grassroots alliance of communities and businesses whose missionis to advocate for a ...
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February 2013 Update from the Ports-to-Plains Alliance

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Handout to Congressional Offices during February 2013 visits

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February 2013 Update from the Ports-to-Plains Alliance

  1. 1. FEBRUARY 2013 UPDATETHE PORTS-TO-PLAINS ALLIANCE“A Corridor of National Significance”
  2. 2. INTRODUCTIONThe Ports-to-Plains Alliance is a non-profit, non-partisan, community-driven advocacy group led bymayors, councilpersons, economic development officials, business and other opinion leaders from anine-state, 2300-plus mile transportation and economic development corridor between Texas andAlberta, Canada.Today, we collaborate with our federal and state leaders, partners in Canada and Mexico, and industrypartners, to deliver the infrastructure, food and fuel to secure the quality of life of Americas greatcities. At the same time, we embrace Americas new energy economy, and are capitalizing upon oil,gas, wind power, biofuels and other innovation sectors to renew one of Americas greatest legacies,the rural heartland.The north-south movement of goods and persons through this region relies on an existing network ofmostly two-lane highways which have been designated by federal law as National Highway SystemHigh Priority Corridors: the Ports-to-Plains Corridor (#38), the Heartland Expressway (#14), and theTheodore Roosevelt Expressway (#58).These existing highways are inadequate to meet current and future needs of the region and thenation. To promote economic security and prosperity throughout Americas energy and agriculturalheartland, these high priority corridors must be upgraded and modernized.An improved transportation network will produce significant benefits: • It will improve safety, cutting accidents by 50 percent from today’s levels. • It will increase the efficiency of agricultural freight flow. Our corridor runs through six of the top ten farm states that produce nearly a quarter of all U.S. agriculture products. • It is necessary for the development of the traditional energy resources essential to our nation’s energy security. We serve eight of the top ten oil producing states. The corridor also goes through five of the top six natural gas producing states. A single oil well requires an estimated 1,200 truck movements to develop. • It is essential to developing the growing renewable energy industry. We serve nine of the top ten states for wind energy potential, and five of the top twelve installed wind generation states. A single wind tower requires eight trucks for major parts, not including the crane, concrete or rebar. One planned wind farm in West Texas would install more than 2,600 towers, and put more than 21,000 trucks and 42,000 pilot cars on the highways in and out of the site. • It is a cost-efficient way to take pressure off of highly-congested parallel corridors, such as the I- 35 corridor. • It will promote economic development in a region of the country that has the highest rate of population loss over the last decade and ensure that America’s heartland and its communities are connected to America by a modern, efficient and safe transportation facility. 2
  3. 3. A STRONG FEDERAL ROLEThe Ports-to-Plains Alliance supports modernizing our Nation’s surface transportation network,including the upgrading of multi-state rural highway corridors, to meet the challenges of the 21stcentury.Given the urgency and magnitude of this undertaking, it is imperative that the Federal Government bethe strong partner that it has been in the past. From the First Congress support of lighthouses, buoysand public piers to make navigation "easy and safe;" to Henry Clays support for internalimprovements; to President Lincolns support for the transcontinental railroad; to President TeddyRoosevelts support of the Panama Canal; to President Franklin Roosevelts support for a cross-country,high-level road system; to President Eisenhowers support of the Interstate Highway System and theFederal Highway Trust Fund; and to President Reagans support for increased motor fuel user fees topreserve and modernize the Federal-aid highway network; the Federal Government has beeninstrumental in the development of our Nations surface transportation system. This system unifiesour country by providing for the easy movement of people and goods. Without it, "we would be amere alliance of many separate parts," as President Eisenhower noted. The Federal Government mustprovide the leadership and resources to help preserve and modernize the national network for the21st century.In order to accomplish these goals, we support a robust federal surface transportation program.Recognizing that preserving and upgrading our national transportation infrastructure will be costly, wesupport significantly increased transportation investment and continued user financing through adedicated trust fund. Picture sequence above is a wind turbine blade being transported around the courthouse in Boise City, Oklahoma 3
  4. 4. MAP-21The Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21) (PublicLaw 112-141) was signed into law by President Obama on July 6, 2012,after passing both the House and Senate with overwhelming bipartisansupport. It funds surface transportation programs at over $105 billionfor FYs 2013 and 2014, MAP-21 and is the first long-term highwayauthorization enacted since 2005.Importantly, the new law makes significant policy changes in theframework for transportation investment. For example, • It streamlines Federal transportation programs, establishing four core highway programs and consolidating or eliminating over 2/3’s of the programs from SAFETEA-LU. • It eliminates all earmarks and most discretionary grant programs. • It guarantees states a 95 percent minimum rate-of-return. • It improves transportation investment decision-making through performance-based planning and programming. • It accelerates project delivery and promotes innovation. • It contains a number of provisions designed to enhance freight movement in support of national goals. • It expands innovative financing opportunities, including a significant expansion of the TIFIA program.The cumulative impact of these reforms are intended to give states greater flexibility to addresspriority needs on the national surface transportation network and allow them to deliver projects moreefficiently and more quickly. The Ports-to-Plains Alliance supports aggressive congressional oversightto ensure that the Administration implements MAP-21 in accordance with congressional intent andthat increased state flexibility does not undermine investment in the national surface transportationnetwork, especially multi-state rural corridors. 4
  5. 5. TRANSPORTATION’S FUNDING SHORTFALLWhile MAP-21 addressed significant transportation policy issues, it did not address the long-termfinancial problems of the Federal Highway Trust Fund. MAP-21 maintained existing transportationinvestment levels. Funding in each of FYs 2013 and 2014 was set at a level slightly above the FY 2012level, but slightly below the SAFETEA-LU funding level that was in place in FYs 2009 through 2011.The Highway Trust Fund could not, however, support these funding levels. To cover the short-termshortfall in the Trust Fund, Congress transferred about $21.2 billion into it. This temporary fix wasnecessary to keep the Highway Trust Fund solvent through the end of FY 2014. To insure no increasein the deficit, Congress offset the transfers, mostly through pension funding stabilization.With MAP-21 expiring on September 30, 2014, the 113th Congress will not only face the need toreauthorize the Federal surface transportation programs, but it will also face the looming HighwayTrust Fund deficit. As the AASHTO chart below shows, the Highway Trust Fund is projected to run asignificant deficit starting in 2015.The challenge will be to develop a long-term fix for the Trust Fund that provides a stable, adequaterevenue stream sufficient to facilitate the modern, efficient, and safe national surface transportationsystem that America needs. In Roll Call, House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee ChairmanBill Shuster described the challenge as follows: With the Highway Trust Fund facing its own version of a fiscal cliff in the coming years, we must find a way to pay for transportation improvements without borrowing from our children. We cannot borrow our way to a better future. We must work together, listen to all ideas and opinions, and build a consensus on what is best for America and our future prosperity.The Ports-to-Plains Alliance agrees. Forging a consensus on a long-term solution is critical. 5
  6. 6. • Through partners, we are three Congressionally-designated, north-south High Priority Corridors, comprising 2,333 miles of highway, 14.8% of total U.S. GDP ($2.2 trillion), and 43.8 million citizens• A major U.S. trading region generating $259.4 billion in trade with Canada and Mexico, more than 24.5% of total U.S.-North America trade• Top 6 nationwide, 8 of the top 10 U.S. states for wind energy generation and generating over 6,000 MW, nearly 77.8% of the U.S. total• 7 of top 10 and 8 of the top 15 oil producing states• Alberta ranks third, after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela, in terms of proven global crude oil reserves.• 5 of the top 6 and 6 of top 10 natural gas producing states• 27.6% of U.S. ethanol refining capacity• North America’s agricultural heartland, producing $23 billion of agricultural goods, or 19.5% of the U.S. total; 4 of the top 8 farm states; Canada and Mexico are the top two export markets for U.S. farm products• Accidents will be significantly reduced on current two-lane segments of the corridor when they are upgraded to four-lane-divided highway. Rural roads are dangerous and improving them saves lives. Each year, more than 42,000 Americans are killed and nearly 3 million are injured on our nation’s roadways. The total economic cost of these crashes exceeds $230 billion annually. Unfortunately, nearly 60 percent of highway fatalities typically occur on two-lane rural roads. When adjusted for vehicle miles traveled, according to the GAO, some rural roads have a fatality rate over six times greater than urban interstates. These facts are extremely troubling since only 40 percent of all vehicle miles are traveled on two-lane rural roads. 6
  7. 7. PORTS-TO-PLAINS CORRIDOR NOT JUST A HIGHWAY Ports-to-Plains: North America’s Energy CorridorTop 6 Nationwide, 8 of the Top America’s Top Oil and Gas10 U.S. States for wind energy Statesgeneration Source:Source: U.S. Department of EnergyU.S. Department of Energy Primary Pipeline Corridor America’s Agricultural for North America’s Oil Heartland Percent Population Change Source: Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture PennWell MapSearch 2000-2009 Source: U.S. Census Bureau
  8. 8. MISSION STATEMENTPorts-to-Plains is a grassroots alliance of communities and businesses whose missionis to advocate for a robust transportation infrastructure to promote economic securityand prosperity throughout North Americas energy and agricultural heartland. PORTS-TO-PLAINS ALLIANCE STAFF Michael Reeves Jacque Daly President Executive Assistant Ports-to-Plains Alliance Ports-to-Plains Alliance Ph: 806-775-2338 Ph: 806-775-3369 michael.reeves@portstoplains.com jacque.daly@portstoplains.com Joe Kiely Cal Klewin Vice President of Operations Executive Director Ports-to-Plains Alliance Theodore Roosevelt Expressway Ph: 303-586-1787 Ph: 701-523-6171 joe.kiely@portstoplains.com cal@trexpressway.com Duffy Hinkle Marlin Johnson Vice President of Membership & Marketing Communications Director Ports-to-Plains Alliance Heartland Expressway Association Ph: 806-755-3373 Ph: 307-331-9313 duffy.hinkle@portstoplains.com mjohnson@scottsbluff.org ALLIANCE HEADQUARTERS 5401 N MLK Blvd. #395 Lubbock TX 79403 Ph: 806-775-3373 www.portstoplains.com

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