Dfid mobiles in development seminar final

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  • 1. Mobile technologies for social transformation Mobiles for development and social change A presentation for DFID 2011 by Peter Holt
  • 2. Development opportunity : Need to find new models for co-ordination and engagement Mobile technologies for social transformation
    • There are 5 billion mobile subsriptions & it is expected that they will exceed 6.2 billion by 2013
    • The fastest growth rate is in sub-sahara Africa
    • Every 10% increase in penetration equates to 1.2% increase in GDP
    • More people have access to a mobile phone than to running water or proper sanitation facilities
  • 3. Mobile in Development : Technology is being used to improve transparency, empowerment and as a catalylst for change Mobile technologies for social transformation Openness and Transparency Data collection Crisis mapping M:health Information and Empowerment M:Learning Mobile money Remote counselling and mentoring
  • 4. Nokia Ovi Life tools Mobile technologies for social transformation
  • 5. Transparency : Improving the timeliness and openness of reporting Mobile technologies for social transformation
  • 6. Transparency : Improving the timeliness and openness of reporting (Pt 1) Mobile technologies for social transformation 1000 mosquito nets @ $20 = $20,000 Financials and annual field report Visibility of field activities 1000 mosquito nets delivered to village Photo is date and location stamped Mosquito nets set up and in use Photo is date and location stamped Outcomes Healthy families and improved school attendance Data capture with mobile forms
  • 7. Transparency : Improving the timeliness and openness of reporting (Pt 2) Mobile technologies for social transformation
    • Monthly web-based reporting
    • Programme managers can see in real-time what is happening and make informed decisions
    • Full transparency for sponsors which improves access to future funding
  • 8. Openness : Ushahidi Mobile technologies for social transformation
  • 9. Mobile technologies for social transformation Empowerment : Giving people access to the information they need, when they need it
  • 10. A model for empowerment : Page  ‘ Empowerment is defined as a person’s capacity to make effective choices: that is, the capacity to transform choices into desired actions and outcomes.’ Coaching and Mentoring Community and social engagement Information and Education Change Space ‘ Change space’ where people are empowered to be the change they want to see
  • 11. Empowerment : The world’s first mobile counselling service Mobile technologies for social transformation Help is at addicts’ fingertips USING TECHNOLOGY TO GET DRUG-FREE “ Demand for substance abuse counselling services has put treatment facilities under pressure as the waiting lists for treatment increases” For replacing the placeholder text you need to click on the placeholder text andinsert your own text.
  • 12. Empowerment : Giving people access to the information they need, when they need it Mobile technologies for social transformation Information The World Health Organisation (WHO) has teamed up with popular mobile social network Mxit and JamiiX to bring emergency preparedness information to chat users in disaster-prone Indonesia http://www.jamiix.com/ Conversations Across South Africa Subscribers: +150,000 Interactions: +5,000,000
  • 13. Mobile Money : Reaching the unbanked Mobile technologies for social transformation
  • 14. Mobile Money : Mpesa Mobile technologies for social transformation
  • 15. Mobile Money : Key enablers Mobile technologies for social transformation High penetration of mobile Limited access to financial services Migrant population Poor infrastructure & security
    • Population is comfortable with mobile technology
    • Low fixed line penetration
    • Mobile operator is a trusted brand
    • Low banking penetration
    • Financial services mainly available in urban areas
    • Limited credit and debit facilities available to masses
    • High need to transfer money from urban to rural areas
    • Limited public transport
    • Traditional money transfer services are costly
    • Security concerns associated with carrying or transporting cash
  • 16. The future of mobiles Mobile technologies for social transformation
  • 17. The cost of mobile Mobile technologies for social transformation From: 0000 To control banana diseases, crush sweet potato leaves and mix with water to spray. Reply with 1. Wilt 2. Weevils 3. Pests 4. Help Mobile Data based solutions can provide more content and be far cheaper
  • 18. Five future trends to 2020 ( http://www.slideshare.net/rudydw/mobile-trends-2020-africa ) Mobile technologies for social transformation
    • Connectivity – sub $50 Smartphones and plummeting data costs will expand the capabilities of those that find themselves on the wrong side of the digital divide.
    • Money – Mobiles replace ATMs as unified payment and money transfers become commonplace inc. interoperability between operators. Micro benefits, insurance and loans all via mobiles.
    • Learning – Universal mobile ownership extends the classroom. Government and NGO collaboration with animated educational games and language options.
    • Empowerment – Mobile apps and social networking empowering individuals through better communication and engagement plus encouraging open Government
    • Health – Mobiles extending the reach and possibility of universal healthcare. Apps improve speed and quality of diagnostics and support rural health workers
  • 19. Nimbus Consulting Mobile technologies for social transformation What we do and how we do it
  • 20.
    • Results not directly tied to improving economic condition of end user
    • Not relevant to local contexts, strengths, or needs
    • Not understanding infrastructure capacity
    • Underestimating maintenance costs and issues
    • Projects supported only by short-term grants
    • Solutions are not looking at the whole problem
    • Projects built on condescending assumptions
    Why engage Nimbus? Challenges with ICT4D programmes (UNESCO & World Bank) Mobile technologies for social transformation
  • 21. Mobile technologies for social transformation Building blocks for an appropriate solution NGO factors Community factors Technology factors Within a framework of stakeholder engagement and deliverable outcomes Accessibility to Technology Literacy levels MDGs Resilience and melioration Commercial models Local Capabilities / Maintenance Culture and beliefs Local Champions Community needs Current programmes Flexible processes Attitude to risk and innovation
  • 22. Mobile technologies for social transformation Delivering an appropriate solution What are the possibilities in terms of enabling factors (coverage, connectivity, electricity)? What are the current levels of access to technology? What are the information needs of the various stakeholder groups? How will these needs evolve? What local skills are available? How will solution be maintained? Is the equipment protected against physical conditions? Has the system been tested with all stakeholders? Have training materials been developed with the community? Is the support organisation able to support all stakeholders (e.g. Gender issues) Do you have local Champions? Iterative co-design
  • 23. Discussion forum The ‘expert’ panel Mobile technologies for social transformation   David Deakin – Head of HIV programmes at Tearfund and former chairman of Interactive Health PLC. Tearfund are currently deploying a mobile solution to support programmes in Malawi and Zambia. Simon Bachelor – Senior Partner at Gamos Simon was at the forefront of establishing the MPesa Mobile money initiative, and Gamos co-authored the recently published UNICEF report ‘Mobiles for Development’. Mike Santer – Director of Nimbus Mike is currently studying a PHD at the University of Southampton on the ‘Affordances of mobiles in least developed countries’.
  • 24. Mobile technologies for social transformation Thank you Contact Details: Peter Holt, Director email: [email_address] call: +447515 571033 Web: www.nimbus.mobi