Reimaging extension education
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Reimaging extension education

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One view on possible uses of tech, changes in engagement and so on for cooperative extension.

One view on possible uses of tech, changes in engagement and so on for cooperative extension.

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Reimaging extension education Reimaging extension education Presentation Transcript

  • Reimaging Extension Education Exploring the impact of technology and culture on tradition and practice. Paul Treadwell, April 2014
  • We are slow to change…  Multiple factors inhibit change within the system  Economics/Funding  Culture  Risk avoidance  Fear of change  Tradition  Inertia
  • The Extension System: A Vision for the 21st Century (2002 ECOP)  Information Technology and Learning Methodologies  Implement an effective electronic technology system and learning information management approach to expand learning choices and methodologies in support of just-in-time information.  Develop and implement alternative means of technology access for rural, disadvantaged and hard-to-reach communities.  Implement partnerships to establish and manage learning centers in high- traffic locations such as libraries, malls and schools. Ensure that Extension community offices are equipped and staffed to become local centers of learning
  • Fearless imagining Let’s spend some time in fearless imagining http://www.donaldedavis.com/PARTS/allyours.html
  • Facilitating learning Is topic area expertise necessary? Is it enough to be able to facilitate learning?
  • Networks  Information, and expertise, is now much more distributed.  Does (or should) extension focus on the role of hub or connector?  Lubell, M., & Niles, M. Extension 3.0: Agriculture Education and Outreach in the Age of Connectivity. http://environmentalpolicy.ucdavis.edu/files/ cepb/Extension%203%200%20White%20Paper. pdf
  • Peer to peer  Technology has expanded participation in knowledge creation  Can we engage as peers?
  • New spaces for extension  Constraints are forcing a re- thinking of our presence in the world  Is virtual an appropriate space?  What we loose online  Best of both worlds – engaging virtually and face to face  Schneider, S. B., Brock, D. J. P., Lane, C. D., Meszaros, P. S., & Lockee, B. B. (2011). Using Information Technology to Forge Connections in an Extension Service Project. Journal of Extension, 49(6), 6FEA5.
  • Making/hacking and the spirit of extension  A hackerspace (also referred to as a hacklab or makerspace, ) is a community-operated workspace where people with common interests, often in computers, machining, technology, science, digital art or electronic art, can meet, socialize and collaborate.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hackerspace
  • Science Shops  Science Shops are small entities that carry out scientific research in a wide range of disciplines – usually free of charge and – on behalf of citizens and local civil society. The fact that Science shops respond to civil society’s needs for expertise and knowledge is a key element that distinguish them from other knowledge transfer mechanisms.  Science Shops are often, but not always, linked to or based in universities. TRYON, E., ROSS, J.. A Community-University Exchange Project Modeled after Europe’s Science Shops. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, North America, 16, May. 2012. Available at: <http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/j heoe/article/view/795>. Date accessed: 16 Apr. 2014.
  • Mobile  Bringing access to the excluded
  • Open Educational Resources  Sharing and re-mixing educational materials Open Educational Resources  are teaching, learning or research materials  that are in the public domain or released with an intellectual property license that allows for free use, adaptation, and distribution. http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and- information/access-to-knowledge/open- educational-resources/
  • Challenges for our future  Funding –  public private?  Digital divide – still a factor  Digital literacies  Rapid pace of change  Maintaining fidelity to mission
  • References  Lubell, M., & Niles, M. Extension 3.0: Agriculture Education and Outreach in the Age of Connectivity. http://environmentalpolicy.ucdavis.edu/files/cepb/Extension%203%200%20White%20Paper.pdf  Mehra, B., & Srinivasan, R. (2007). The library-community convergence framework for community action: libraries as catalysts of social change. Libri,57(3), 123-139.  Schneider, S. B., Brock, D. J. P., Lane, C. D., Meszaros, P. S., & Lockee, B. B. (2011). Using Information Technology to Forge Connections in an Extension Service Project. Journal of Extension, 49(6), 6FEA5.  Seger, J. (2011). The new digital [st] age: Barriers to the adoption and adaptation of new technologies to deliver extension programming and how to address them. Journal of Extension, 49(1), 1FEA1.  Tennessen, D. J., PonTell, S., Romine, V., & Motheral, S. W. (1997). Opportunities for Cooperative Extension and local communities in the information age. Journal of Extension, 35(5), n5.  TRYON, E., ROSS, J.. A Community-University Exchange Project Modeled after Europe’s Science Shops. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, North America, 16, May. 2012. Available at: <http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/jheoe/article/view/795>. Date accessed: 16 Apr. 2014.  V, R. S., Hall, A., & Kalaivani, N. J. (2012). Necessary , But Not Sufficient : Critiquing the Role of Information and Communication Technology in Putting Knowledge into Use. The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, 18(4), 331–346.