La cce brigada exploratoria en nicaragua ns
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La cce brigada exploratoria en nicaragua ns

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  • the belief that cultivating cross cultural learning within CCE is not only valuable on an individual level, but is necessary to help insure the success and impacts of our programming as we move forward.
  • Enhance Cooperative Extension’s ability to make informed decisions that strengthen youth, families and communities, sustain natural resources, and improve the economy.

La cce brigada exploratoria en nicaragua ns Presentation Transcript

  • 1. La CCE Brigada exploratoria en Nicaragua CONTEXTO, ENCUENTROS Y REFLEXIONES
  • 2. Context Building cross cultural competencies within CCE Existing and emerging relationships in Nicaragua Support from ESP Current University (and CALs) prioritizing of international work and experience.
  • 3. Benefits of International Experiences International experiences can:  Increase understanding of connectedness, commonality of issues in a globalizing world  Re-invigorate practices at home  Build networks for collaboration  Increase our capacity to "enhance public understanding of global issues" (Ludwig & McGirr, 2003, p. 410).
  • 4. Trip goals Gain first-hand experience of how rural outreach/extension agencies in a foreign culture address issues similar to those that New York faces. Meet colleagues in Nicaragua and explore potential opportunities for collaboration. Develop a multi-disciplined CCE Extension Educator team that will work together in the future to provide interdisciplinary solutions to complex problems in New York.
  • 5. The brigade Paul Treadwell – Trip coordinator Helene Dillard Rod Howe Rocky Kambo Shawn Smith Nancy Schaff Mary Wrege Chip Malone Paul LaChapelle (University of Montana)
  • 6. Encounters
  • 7. San Ramon Homestays Encounters:  UCA  Finca La Hermandad  CESESMA  Mujeres La Pita  El Chile  La Chispa
  • 8. UCA –Case study
  • 9. CESESMA – Case study Community Need Strategic Planning Programs Evaluation
  • 10. Leon September 11-13 Encounters (UNAN Leon)  Pueblo Redondo  Iguana Nursery  Womens development  Tito Anton’s farm  Colleges  Agroecology  Vet medicine  Botanical Garden
  • 11. Pueblo Redondo – Case study
  • 12. Tito Anton – Case study
  • 13. UNAN Leon
  • 14. 4-S: Saber, Sentimientos, Servicio, SaludNew York 4-H Nicaragua 4-S Head . Heart . Hands . Health• 4-S existed in Nicaragua in past• USDA Foreign Ag Service providing funds for Fabretto Foundation to start up 4-S on small scale• Supporting 4-S clubs/connecting NY 4-Hers with Nicaraguan youth • Collegiate 4-H members as virtual mentors • New York “sister” 4-H clubs • Shared projects • Peace Corps volunteers • Planting Hope
  • 15. Diverse Cognitive Styles and Learning Preferences Ideas for Planning Curriculum with and/or on Behalf of Youth Some North Some Latin Some Northern Some AsianAmerican Cultures American European Cultures Personalized Cultures  Precisely timed options Cultures detailed plan • Elaborate form • Coherent Activities to  Wide variety of • Relational activities structure activities compare & contrast • Flexibility in • Thematic  Clarity in Freedom in schedule acceptable activities schedule schedule • Reflective • Limited choices  Concrete Active observation in schedule experience experience • Abstract  Learning through • Learning through receiving Learning through knowledge peer discussion receiving  Concern with how • Concern with • Learning Concern with to create good how to conduct through relationships how to get things done conversation discussion with  The joy of The joy of • The joy of rhetoric experts agreement competence • Self-directed group • Concern with  Organized group Limited group activities how to conduct activities activities conversation • The joy of critical engagement • Very limited group activities Adapted from J. Bennett, 2001, Intercultural Communication Institute. From a presentation by Jennifer Skuza, University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development
  • 16. Experiential Learning in Cultural Contexts 1. Experience/ Experimentar 5. Do/ 2. Apply/ Share/ Aplicar Hacer Compartir Apply/ Reflect/ Aplicar Reflexionar Generalize/ Process/ Generalizar Procesar 4. 3.
  • 17. Reflections
  • 18. A few post trip comments When visiting the University, surprised at how run- down, sparse, and minimal the facilities were but the staff was positive, had refreshing vision and looked to the future with vision. Another image that has stayed with me is the people who care about their country and land. The welcoming (open arms) with which we were greeted in almost every situation. Local people provide such a different experience than anyone can ever expect listening to world news.
  • 19. Next steps• JULY 2013 VISIT BY NICARAGUAN COLLABORATORS • Michael Sobalvarro • Marvin Jarquin or Tito Anton UNAN Leon• AUGUST 2013 CCE/ESP 10 DAY RESEARCH/STUDY TRIP• CONTACT: PAUL TREADWELL PT36@CORNELL.EDU
  • 20. Questions and discussion