Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Waves of Despair, Tides of Hope - English

555

Published on

A panel presentation by Japanese municipal government officials who participated in the March 2011 tsunami response and recovery efforts in Japan was held Wednesday, August 29, 2012. The event was …

A panel presentation by Japanese municipal government officials who participated in the March 2011 tsunami response and recovery efforts in Japan was held Wednesday, August 29, 2012. The event was co-hosted by Portland State University's Center for Public Service and The Tokyo Foundation.

As part of the 2012 Intensive Professional Training for Japanese Municipal Government Managers Program, three program participants talked about the lessons learned from the Tohoku Earthquake/tsunami response efforts. These three speakers were from the direct area that was affected by the March 11 Tohoko Earthquake.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
555
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. March 11, 2011. At 3:23PM 37 minutes afterthe earthquake, a jet black wave rose witha loud roaring noise and swept into theurban areas. 2
  • 2. ・June 6, 2005, Miyako City, Tarou-chou and Niisato-Miyako City Location mura merged. ・ January 1, 2010, Kawai-mura was incorporated and Overview into Miyako City. ・ Area: 1,259.89 square kilometers. (2nd largest in Touhoku Region and 8th largest in Japan) ・ Ratio of elderly population over 65: 30.9% (2010) ・ Total fertility rate: 1.71 (2006-2010) ・ 2hrs to the nearest bullet train station (Morioka- eki); 2hrs to IC; 2.5hrs to the airport; 2hrs to the Prefectural Capitol, Morioka; 4.5 hrs to Tokyo; The farthest city from Tokyo (in terms of travel time) of all cities having a population above 50,000. Miyako City 3
  • 3. Easternmost city in Japan ◆ Major area for wood and wood manufacturing ・Plywood mills located here produce approx. 300,000m3 of plywood annually, comprising 11% of the domestic market share. ・20,000T of raw materials are imported and 70% shipped to the Kanto Region ・Dedicated to employment in forestry using domestically produced materials. ・Concentration of industry related to production of particle board and wood furniture. ◆ Tourism ・One million tourists visit Jyodogahama per year ◆ Seafood processing JoudogahamaNational Scenic ・Iwate prefecture is home to 111 fishing harbors, 4 major ports, 2 regional ports. Site ・Catch landing in Miyako port:43,000 ton(2010) East longitude 142 degrees, 4 minutes, 21 seconds. Easternmost point on Japans main island (Honshuu) is Todogasaki Miyako Port 4
  • 4. Details of Tsunami after the earthquake• Time of occurrence: 2:46PM Friday, March 11, 2011• Epicenter: Sanriku region at latitude 38 degrees 6.2 minutes north and longitude 142 degrees 51.6 minutes west• Depth: Approx. 24km 3:18 PM• Magnitude 9.0• Maximum seismic intensity: Upper 5• Warnings and announcements Fri, March 11, 2:49pm/Tsunami warning was issued in Iwate Sat, March 12, 8:20pm/ Downgraded from "Major" to “Tsunami warning.” Sun, March 13, 7:30am/ Warning downgraded to Tsunami 3:23 PM advisory Sun, March 13, 5:58pm/ Tsunami advisory lifted• First wave arrival time / height 2:48pm/0.2m• Highest wave arrival time / height 3:26pm/more than8.5m(For reference) Maximum runup height 37.9m Tarou/Koborinai district 40.5m Omoeaneyoshi district ( Photos take from mayors office on 4th flr of Miyako Municipal 3:30 PM Bldg. ) 5
  • 5. Houses swept away Breached seawall (Kanahama district) Disaster Record一Mountains of debris in the Piled up cars at Fujiwara Wharf Tarou district 6
  • 6. Disaster results 2011/3/11 2011/6/11 2012/4/25 Dead 62 people 409 people 515 people Injured 11 people 33 people 33 people Missing 628 people 280 people 97 people ※Officially dead includedHouses Destroyed 2,061 houses 4,675 houses 4,675 houses※ Among the dead: 4 Fire Dept. Employees, 16 Fire Brigade Members, 2 Policeman killed onduty.※ Individuals in their 60s and 70s comprised 50% of fatalities. If those in their 80s and 90s areincluded, that percentage rises to 70%.※ Breakdown of housing losses・ Total collapse- 3,669 homes ・ 50% collapse - 1,006 homes ・ Partial loss- 176 homes ・Water damaged floors- 1760 homes ・ Water damage below floors- 323 homes. Population before and after the Tsunami 2011/3/1 2012/6/1 Increase / Decrease Population 60,124 People 58,359 People △1,765 People Households 24,332 24,141 △191 Households Households Households 7
  • 7. • Municipal Disaster Response Central Facilities:Details of the Disaster Results 2:46PM, Friday, 3/11/, 2011 • Levigation gates closed. 111 gates closed at time of warning. 93 gate locations in Miyako District. 18 closed in Tarou District • Evacuation orders given: 2:46PM, Friday, 3/11,/2011 • Evacuation orders lifted: 5:58PM, Sunday, 3/13,/2011 • 5,227 homes ordered to evacuate. 12,842 people. • Shelters/Evacuees: 85 locations / 8,889 evacuees (at peak)Estimate numbers of Evacuation places and Evacuees 3/14 6/14 8/11 Number of Number of Number of Area evacuation Evacuees Evacuees Evacuees evacuation places evacuation places places 1(市営住 Miyako 34 4,206 6 273 4 宅) Kuwafasaki 4 372 3 116 0 0 Sakiyama 10 914 0 0 0 0 Hanawa 3 180 0 0 0 0Tsugaruishi 12 1,305 2 30 0 0 Omoe 10 619 5 122 0 0 Taro 12 1,293 1 528 0 0 Total 85 8,889 17 1,069 ※10月7 日、完全閉鎖 1 4 8
  • 8. Evacuation places and Evacuees At the beginning Stable Period■What was needed? ■ Road and Lifeline Restored○Water, Food, Stove, Fuel -> Offered by residents○Blankets →Reserve storage, voluntary ○ Movement of people and roads, deployment transportation organizations, electric■Shelter operations by early administration was○Bathroom → Voluntary deployment power, communications challenging →Response provided by school ○ Materials distribution base operations staff, volunteer disaster response organizations stabilized. Prepared to respond to needs of and area residents shelters.□Reasons: ■Evacuees act by themselves○Municipal building damaged and isolated. Staff ○ Evacuees self-organized, provided daily internal trapped inside severely delaying initial and external information. Information exchange between shelters and government sped up. response. ○ As volunteer disaster response groups and○In addition to the loss of 70 public government become familiar with shelter vehicles, gathering and dissemination of operations, volunteer support comes up to speed information was limited by interruption of and support broadens. electric power, causing constraints on availability and deliverability of supplies. Daily community helps and supportsThe challenge to run evacuation places○Facilities people use daily have to be designated as evacuation places and equipped with disaster-prevention functions such assupplies and communication facilities.○Communities ran the evacuation places at this time. Support for voluntary anti-disaster organizations is needed. 9
  • 9. Temporary Housing ■Number of structures 2,010(63 places) ■Ready for occupancy: Aug. Houses Location 11 Miyako 745 Units Kuwagasaki 224 Units Sakiyama 51 Units Hanawa 114 Units■ Features Tsugaruishi 250 Units・Location near to prior residences before the disaster Omoe 84 Units・Avoid school facilities Taro 482 Units・Small groups with 10 to 30 houses Niisato 60 Units・Arranged house assignment to retain local community Total 2,010 Units The challenge ○City parks should be preserved as anti-disaster spaces to construct temporary housing when necessary Every possible consideration must be paid to maintain local community for the prevention of solitary deaths and suicide 10
  • 10. Economic and Infrastructural Damage ■Sites Damaged 15,231 sites ■Economic Damage 1,975 billion yen ( 2011 initial budget amount for Miyako city: 303 billion yen) Details of the damages ・Destroyed houses 6,934 houses/1,066 billion yen ・commerce and industry facilities 1,079 damages/281 billion yen ・Fisheries-related business 6,278 damages/215 billion yen ・Tourist industry 52 damages/136 billion yen ・fishing harbors 147 damages/127 billion yen Washed up cultivating equipment Destroyed public housing 11
  • 11. Disaster Waste Matter Situation Type Debris Volume Disaster WasteTimbers / Dimension 37,600lumber Huge numbers of the wasteBurnable 116,700 Entrust disposal to Iwate prefectureNon-burnable 427,700 Ref: Ave. waste disposal for city is 20,000Sediments tons/yr(Reconstruction materials: 107,800Concrete related) Disposal in larger area ・Tokyo: From Nov. 2011 to June 2012Metal scraps 23,100 Daisen City: Began April 2012 ・East Azuma Sanitation FacilitiesPlastic 2,900 Cooperative (3 facilities: Nakanojou, East Azuma, Takayama) = Acceptance from June 8Straw mats 1,000 Amount disposed as of May21:Other (fishing nets, About 41000 tons 15,300etc.) 5.6% of the totalTotal 732,100 12
  • 12. Warm Support○Donations distributed to quake victims *of direct donations to city Approx. $7M (to 2,162 households) (at .78 exchange rate) Current 6/1/2012○Education assistance Distributed to children orphaned in the disaster Approx. $750K (to 173 households) (at .78 exchange rate) Current 6/1/2012○General Assistance Avail to city for disaster recovery measures Approx. $3.9M (to 733 households) (at .78 exchange rate) Current 6/1/2012○Also receiving many other types of material and personnel support for temporary clinics, temporary daycare facilities, construction of care homes and etc. 13
  • 13. Miyako City Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Plan Reconstruction Plan 【Basic Plan】 Plan Period: 2011~2019 Reconstruction Plan 【Proposal ■1st: Start Plan】 ■2nd: Policy for buildup of city foundations ■Project implementation for reconstruction ■Project implementation for reconstruction by region ■3rd: Initiatives (efforts) toward reconstruction Regional reconstruction plan Rebuild dwellings and livelihoods 33 disaster districts Industry and economic reconstruction Industry and economic reconstruction ・Draft and present a pattern for city re- construction planning . ■4rth: Important reconstruction projects Residential reconstruction assistance project ・Regional re-construction planning to be formulated by Residents Port city industrial development promotion project Forest, river and ocean-base Start up Planning Commission renewable energy project composed of regional residents. Disaster Prevention City Joint Action Panels by local residents Project Disaster Memories Preservation Project ・事業手法の決定、法定手続 ■5th: Region-specific Reconstruction ※ 検討会立上型 10地区 Planning policy direction 全体協議型 23地 区 Taro region, Miyako region, Omoe region ■6th: to propel (drive forward) the Pay utmost respect to the opinions reconstruction of the residents. 14
  • 14. Miyako city will recover for sure! "Miyako Fall Festival" Splendidly... Rikuchu‐kaigan National Park "Joudogahama"We appreciated warm support from all parts of the country. 15
  • 15. Importance of local disaster prevention capability in the East Japan great earthquake disaster ~Learning from activities in Minami Sanriku city Sanda City Fire department Juni chi Matsuo Wed.Aug.29.2 012
  • 16. Minamisanriku fro m Sanda City 20 The Earthqu hours 600m ake Point The Town of MINAMISAN RIKU ilesSanda City
  • 17. Minamisanriku Fire StationResponsibility・ Take on the role of the fire dept. in strickenareas (Fire, Rescue、First Aid)・ Search & rescue and first aid service at shelters
  • 18. Issues In Firefighting Activities・ It took too long to decide where to dispatch fire and rescue teamsfrom other parts of Japan and from all over the world. (Rescue teamsfrom Hyogo pref. were dispatched right after the earthquake. However,they couldnt find any survivors because their destination of MinamiSanriku city was decided on the 14th and rescue service didnt startuntil the 15th.)・ Hyogo rescue teams had 50 fire engines and ambulance, and 200rescue members but there were not enough places for both cars andpeople to camp. (Teams had to camp away from the earthquakestricken areas.)・ The affected areas were covered with debris and the only road(just made by the self-defense forces) was so narrow only one vehiclecould get through at a time. It was avery rough road that caused manyflat tires for fire engines and ambulances.・ The stricken areas were spread wide but large fire engines andother large trucks and machines couldnt get through so transportationfor rescue teams had to be provided by ambulances.
  • 19. Learning From the Experience・ Few people were rescued by firefighters. (In the 1995 Kobe quake, 98% of rescues were performed by neighbors.)・ Awareness and training of firefighters andvolunteer disaster response organizations is veryimportant.・ (Importance of disaster response training forjunior and high school students.・ The key to find missing people is everydayneighborly relationships. (Everybody knows wherehis/her neighbors are when life-line is cut off.)
  • 20. Regarding Shelters・For food supplies, survivors at shelters broughtfood from houses which werent affected by thedisaster due to their higher elevation.・As the days went by, refugees rapidly increasedbeyond the local evacuees directly following thedisaster.・For heating at shelters, survivors brought fuelfrom their homes and used kerosene stoves at theshelters.
  • 21. Conditions at shelters (1)
  • 22. Conditions at shelters (2)
  • 23. What I heard and saw at a shelter with 500 evacuees (1)・Clean bathrooms (cleaning was regular andbuckets were provided)・There was always somebody loading snow into atemporary water tank. (To flush toilets and for washing hair)・I don‘t remember what time but it got very quietat night. (I could only hear somebody coughing orvomiting.)・When helicopters with supplies arrived atshelters, people lined up in a single line and theconveyance of supplies went smoothly.
  • 24. What I heard and saw at a shelter with 1500 - 2000 Evacuees・Frequent dispatch requests・Residents were in a state of chaos・Toilets were plugged and overflowing. (Nobody cleaned the bathrooms and bucketswere scattered around.・I often saw people making suggestions todisaster response HQ.・There were many doctors and nurses at theshelters but they appeared to be always busilyrunning around.
  • 25. Lessons learned from observing shelters:・ Shelters with around 500 refugees are easier tomanage.・ Ongoing neighborhood relationships frombefore the disaster seem very important. (Probablypeople who act as leaders were already leadersbefore disaster.)・ If a shelter is large scale with a disasterresponse main office inside, Then a mayor, policeofficers, the self-defense force, firefighters would bestationed there. This situation may encouragepeople to be more vocal with their demands.
  • 26. The Emergency Management HQ Building at 15:30
  • 27. The roof top of the Emergency Management HQ Building at 15:40
  • 28. Disaster response unite office immediately after the disaster
  • 29. Finally・I want to say thank you to people from all overthe world for your assistance and warm wordstoward disaster stricken areas in East Japan.・I also want to thank Prof. Nishishiba, studentsand faculty from PSU, and people from the city ofPortland for creating this opportunity to presentthis information. Thank you for listening.
  • 30. Lessons learned from the case ofregistered tangible cultural properties case 3 Sakuragawa-city, Ibaraki-prefecture Hiromasa Konno
  • 31. 自宅Profile of SAKURAGAWA Sakuragawa is a city in Ibaraki, Japan. It was formed on October 1, 2005. It isComposed of Iwase-machi, Yamato-mura, and Makabe-machi. The city is known for its stone works using the resources of Mt. Kaba, and itsagriculture using the abundant flatlands to the west of the mountains. The City name, Sakuragawa River is running from north to south through the city. SAKURAGAWA 真壁
  • 32. Major aftershocksEurasia plate 3/11 3/12 4/7 North America Direction of crust shift Plate 3/113/12 3/11 4/113/15 3/11 Pacific plate Philippine Seat Plate
  • 33. It must be tough I don’t on you. mind it. I love this town. Makabe – planning a town of tradition and hospitality筑波大学が製作した展示用町並み模型(1/400縮尺。中心部1/150も製作)
  • 34. Head Vice-HeadSpirit of autonomy that has been passed down in generations Facilitator ConsultingAdministration Resident Resident Resident Resident
  • 35. Sake brewery Shinto Shrine Silk millJapanese-style restaurant&hotel
  • 36. “ Makabe hina doll festival ”
  • 37. 400 year-old town layout still existsEdo period
  • 38. Silk mill
  • 39. 自宅Sake brewery
  • 40. 自宅
  • 41. Immediately after quake: 2 mud warehouses collapsed. Gate pillars shifted.
  • 42. Day of quake: Stone warehouses built in this period lack earthquake preparedness.
  • 43. Day after quake: Oya stone fences were completely destroyed. Stone warehouses with structural problems collapsed.
  • 44. Cultural Affairs Agency 文化庁 Response meeting 災害復旧修理方針の検討Mayor 市長
  • 45. It must be tough I don’t on you. mind it. I love this town. Makabe – planning a town of tradition and hospitality筑波大学が製作した展示用町並み模型(1/400縮尺。中心部1/150も製作)
  • 46. Discussion

×