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Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed
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Let’s Cut the QRap! The Good, the Bad, the Ugly of QR Codes in Higher Ed

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QR codes are the Holy Grail or Marketing, right? Ok, Let's Cut the QRap Presented at the HighEdWeb Arkansas conference, This session will address the benefits and pitfalls of marketing with QR Codes. …

QR codes are the Holy Grail or Marketing, right? Ok, Let's Cut the QRap Presented at the HighEdWeb Arkansas conference, This session will address the benefits and pitfalls of marketing with QR Codes. From an introduction to best practices in their use, to reviews of case studies highlighting the good, the bad (and let’s face it, they are all ugly), to even the absurd, we will discuss their validity as effective tools in the world of HigherEd marketing and communications. Additionally, this session will explore what may (or may not) be the future replacement for QR codes: NFC and augmented reality. Unless of course, the next big thing comes along before thent

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  • What are QR codes? They odd, most often ugly, square boxes with strange black lines?For marketers it seems, they are the holy grail of marketing engagement. We’ve embraced them as a potential savior of the print ad, leading to endless engagement with our targeted audience, right
  • QR = Quick Response – it’s a link to these items.2d = two dimensional, meaning when scanned, it can be read both vertically and horizontally, (unlike traditional linear bar codes), thereby can contain mucn more information than a traditional barcode
  • In order to read, or scan a barcode, you need to download a reader app.Most are free, and many have added security features allowing you to preview the URL prior to scanning. Some even allow you to create your own QR codes from your phone.
  • But originally, that was not the intended use of the creator of the QR code – Denso Wave. It was created by this subsidiary of Toyota in 1994 as a way to assist in the automated tracking of automotive parts inventory. It is open source, but it is a registered trade mark of Denso Wave.Seeing it’s popularity, DensoWave recently added a QR code generator along with a separate facebook and twitter pages
  • But when you get down to it, a QR code is nothing more then a link. A hyperlink that allows you to use your smartphone to bridge from the printed physical world to the digital world.1) Over 55% of Americans are now smartphone users. Most are between 24-35. Men and women have adopted smartphones at about the same pace.2) One in every five American smartphone users scanned a QR code in a retail store in 2011.3) 57% of those who scanned QR codes in 2011 did so at home on their mobile devices (users realized QR codes have value beyond on-the-go information)4) One third of QR code scanners did so in response to a coupon or offer.5) One quarter of QR code scanners did so to receive information on an event.Taken together, these numbers clearly suggest that QR Code awareness and engagement is rising alongside Smartphone adoption. What’s more, QR code users are growing more sophisticated, recognizing that QR Codes can quickly provide a variety of benefits—from event info to product discountsThe end result, the CONTENT is what you need to focus on. The end user experience and how it is relevant to them should be the focal point.So, if they are so easy, and they provide that link, aren’t lots of people scanning them!
  • So if they are just a link, why do they make people so angry?Designers hate them – They are difficult to design around.Do we try to hide them, or make them so prominent as to take away from the message?
  • Take a look at the YouTube video post by Scott Stratten (unmarketing) – Killing Kittens with QR codes
  • Take a look at the YouTube video post by Scott Stratten (unmarketing) – Killing Kittens with QR codesMore examples of ill advised uses of QR codes. They may not have killed any kittens, but they certainly injured some.
  • One of the biggest reasons of failure is what’s on the back end. There is no relevant information presented, no reward, nothing of value for the time involved.
  • Based upon the results of this study – 500 students in 24 colleges:81% of students owned a smartphone80% of students have seen a QR Code21% successfully scanned a QR code example75% said they are not likely to scan a QR code in the futureQR codes are not being “force fed” as the study claims. Brands are choosing to use QR codes on their own – rightly or wrongly.Some didn’t know how or want to scan a QR code – WHY? Marketers/Agencies are not willing to educate consumers, regardless of age or technological experiences. They throw a code onto something and hope that the consumers get it!Archrival contends that there are “serious barriers” – maybe…but “serious” may be an overstatement”If QR codes can’t be adapted by the College students…there is no hope. Hmm…majority of iPads & tablets owners are beyond the college age.
  • Speak to your audience – make the content relevant to them.Educate the end user –Give them a reason to scan the code – an incentive, a contest,
  • Near field communication (NFC) is the technology that enables smartphones and other devices to establish a radio connection by touching them together or coming within close proximity. You may not have heard of it, but near field communication (NFC) is the technology that major companies are betting will become a central part of every mobile phone user's life.NFC technology has not been heavily adopted in the U.S. yet, but according to some analysts' estimates there will be a greater push for mobile users to adopt the technology in the next few yearsNear field communication, abbreviated NFC, is a form of contactless communication between devices like smartphones or tablets. Contactless communication allows a user to wave the smartphone over a NFC compatible device to send information without needing to touch the devices together or go through multiple steps setting up a connection. NFC was originally developed and promoted as a highly secure technology to enable mobile payments and ticketing applications, enabling consumers to make payments by merely tapping their cellular device against an NFC-enabled payment terminal to conduct a transaction
  • QR codes offer free access. NFC requires the purchase of chip hardwareEmbedding an NFC chip raises a product’s cost. QR code application does notNFC tags cannot simply be printed. QR codes canQR codes can be placed high and at a distance – ineffective for NFC tagsNFC technology can create security and identity theft issues. QR codes do notQR codes can be easily mass-tested for reliability. NFC chips should be individually testedMost new mobile phones include a free QR code reader. Today’s NFC technology likely requires a new handsetA QR code can be incorporated into more marketing materials than an NFC chip can be embeddedQR codes can be scanned from a distance. NFC requires a distance of less than 10 centimeters. (For best results, users should touch the tag with their device.)A QR code can sustain some damage and still be functional. Damage renders an NFC tag useless
  • Augmented reality is tough to explain, but it does exactly what its name implies augments reality. The example that most people can relate to is its use in televised sports, when your watching a football game the computer generated first-down line . Augmented reality – The Addition of Fake Things to the Real WorldThe basic idea of augmented reality is to superimpose graphics, audio and other sensory enhancements over a real-world environment in real time. Television networks been doing that with graphics for decades. Now it is moving to mobile. According to Juniper Research, increasing focus on incorporating augmented reality (AR) elements within mobile applications is predicted to lead to nearly 1.4 billion annual downloads of such apps worldwide by 2015.A consumer can point their phone an image and see a whole new layer of information, designed to connect them to a brand or product and deliver extra information in an engaging way.Here are some examples to give you a visual of AR.Bottom image is a augmented reality art show that debuted at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art. The physical show was visible to regular visitors, but those who were using a mobile phone application called Layar on their smart phones could see additional works on each of the floors,What’s excites marketers and advertisers about it its ability to bring life to an inanimate image and it can be applied to a billboard, poster or any other printed material. A consumer can point their phone at such an image and see a whole new layer of information, designed to connect them to a brand or product and deliver extra information in an engaging way.The basic idea of augmented reality is to superimpose graphics, audio and other sensory enhancements over a real-world environment in real time.AR has become common in sports telecasting. The yellow "first down" line seen in television broadcasts of American football games shows the line the offensive team must cross to receive a first down using the 1st & Ten system. The real-world elements are the football field and players, and the virtual element is the yellow line, which augments the image in real time. Pattern AR enables mobile devices to recognize shapes (markers) and replaces them with two-dimensional images, 3D models, audio, and video.
  • Marker-based implementation utilizes some type of image such as a QR/2D code to produce a result when it is sensed by a reader, typically a camera on a cell phone.Markerless AR is often more reliant on the capabilities of the device being used such as the GPS location, velocity meter, etc. It may also be referred to as Location-based or Position-based AR.Both Marker-based and Markerless AR require AR specific software or browsers to function. Marker-based AR is currently the most prevalent and easiest to accomplish. While Markerless AR is emerging, it is currently rather limited due to sensor accuracy (i.e. GPS accuracy anywhere between 10 – 50 meters), service limits (i.e. indoors vs outdoors), bandwidth requirements (4G is not a reality in all places nor can the devices currently in existence actually handle it), and power pulls on the devices.
  • Beyond the cool factor of Iron Man flying around in your living room, AR presents a couple of huge advantages over current print-to-Web promotional tools, like QR (Quick Response) codes. First, AR uses no print space, so you don’t have to clutter up an advertisement with an unsightly QR tag that will do nothing but baffle most users.Second – and possibly more important - you can program AR to respond to existing assets already in circulation, like a year-old movie poster, a vending machine or the Empire State Building. Of course, that suggests there will definitely be some conflict-management challenges in networked social environments, where different AR systems try to interact with the same real-world images.Still, in addition to the huge gaming opportunities (imagine a fantasy game in which real people appear as wizards, warriors and ogres), Augmented Reality opens up enormous real-world marketing opportunities. The first time a Coke machine seems to comes to life and offers you a deal, QR codes will seem positively quaint
  • Transcript

    • 1. Let’s Cut the QRap! Paul Strack – July 27, 2012 @pstrack pstrack@customxm.com #hewebar
    • 2. Session AgendaWhat are they and why do theyexist?Why do they make us angry?How are they working inHigherEd?What can we do to ease thetension?What’s next?
    • 3. “QR Code is a registered trademark of Denso Wave Corporation.”
    • 4. =
    • 5. Why do QRcodes makepeople so angry?
    • 6. It’s super easy! Write down… Blackberry? 15 codes!Write down (again!)It’s automatic!
    • 7. Is that allthere is?
    • 8. Archrival Youth Marketing study – QR Codes on College Campuses – November 2011
    • 9. Size matters. White space is our friend.
    • 10. Don’t Be Dense.
    • 11. Talk to me!Teach me! Give me a reason!
    • 12. links toYouTubevideo.
    • 13. Sooner ScanGoals!• improve promotion of campus with cool facts• Improve campus navigation & include social interactionBest practices learned:• Educate & secure your content• Understand your audience• Mobile Friendly content• Make the content valuable
    • 14. Let’s Cut the Crap! • Size Matters • Shorten URL • Make it Mobile • Location, Location, Location • Educate the User • Give Users a reason to scan • Reward the Users • Provide Value • Measure, Track, Adjust, RepeatQR Code Usage – Best Practices
    • 15. Near field communication,or NFC, allows for simplifiedtransactions, data exchange, andconnections with a touch”. NFC
    • 16. NFC – Lexus ad in Wired
    • 17. Less expensive, free access Currently more recognizableFaster, Easier? No “hardware” requiredPeople are used to the“tap/bump concept Scan from further away NFC vs QR
    • 18. Augmented Reality Becoming AccessibleSource: Juniper Research Augmented Reality
    • 19. Skinned appMarkerless AR Marker-based AR
    • 20. Source: Juniper Research
    • 21. Requires no print space Less expensive, free accessfor code or marker Currently more recognizableTriggers can already be inexistence Less development requiredMore marketingopportunities AR vs QR
    • 22. Let’s Cut the QRap! QR or NFC or AR??
    • 23. Thank you! @pstrackpstrack@customxm.com

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