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  • Designing Learning NetworksThe Allentown School District organizes over 18,000 students, teachers, administrators and supporting staff.  To take their many challenges head-on, Allentown School District began employing social media as an internally focused sharing and learning solution for its administrators, faculty and staff. Initial goals are very straightforward: break down the cliques and silos, reduce misinformation and identify cross-functional areas of opportunity for collaboration to generate educational, operational and administrative improvements. The organization is tackling the inherent challenges that come with any new communication technology, including balancing the needs of sharing while considering the sensitivity of information and scale of participation.  Sharing across administrator, teacher and student boundaries is essential for holistic problem-solving, yet solving localized problems is sometimes easier solely contained within respective groups.  Similarly, large groups of diverse problem solvers can produce innovative solutions, yet openness and trust can often form faster and better in small groups. Additionally, the need to extract and share data between compartmented segments, to optimize the network and its problem solving capabilities, can be challenging.
  • Design thinkingwhyPractical approaches to starting and growingTargets and frames for growing and scaling
  • Design thinkingwhyPractical approaches to starting and growingTargets and frames for growing and scalingThe organization is tackling the inherent challenges that come with any new communication technology, including balancing the needs of sharing while considering the sensitivity of information and scale of participation.  Sharing across administrator, teacher and student boundaries is essential for holistic problem-solving, yet solving localized problems is sometimes easier solely contained within respective groups.  Similarly, large groups of diverse problem solvers can produce innovative solutions, yet openness and trust can often form faster and better in small groups. Additionally, the need to extract and share data between compartmented segments, to optimize the network and its problem solving capabilities, can be challenging.
  • And most importantly, each of us can teach each other, we need to know who is like or unlike us ……>10k, >5k, >2k, >1k, >500, >200, >100, >50Existing SM solution?How many framed around learning?To find out how to make what we have betterTo know if we should start somethingTo find out what else is possible
  • Design is everythingcite the book: Marketing Metaphoria. Maybe put a QR code in the lower right corner for people to purchase the book from Amazon.
  • Connect resources: People to people and people to contentConnect the connectorsPush the journey
  • Throughput, information flow and infrastructureDeloitte quote
  • The flow of an organization is not the organization chart….How do I find the flow?How do we find the emerging flows?What are the most important flows?How do we encourage flows to continue?How do we create environments for flows to occur?
  • How do you negotiate the balance between people organizing how they want to organize and following this model?
  • EX Apple, Appstore, Iphone UsersA set of concentric communitiesWhere new knowledge is created and flows
  • The Klout Score is the measurement of one’s overall online influence. The scores range from 1-100 with higher scores representing a wider and stronger sphere of influence. The Klout Score is a factor of over 35 variables broken into three categories; True Reach, Amplification Score and Network Score. True Reach is the size of one’s engaged audience and is based on the followers and friends who actively listen and react to one’s messages.

Social Media Social Media Presentation Transcript

  • Michael Hruska, CEOGerald L. Zahorchak, D.Ed, mike@problemsolutions.netSuperintendent @mikehruskawww.allentownsd.org www.problemsolutions.net Resources, connections, and the journey
  • Takeaways• Goals of a solution• Why it can work• How to start up• How to grow• How to scale• Approaches for design
  • Solution Goals and Background• 18,000 students• 1250 teachers• 400 + administrators• Tools – Yammer and Facebook – Admin (Y) – School (Physical) driven groups (Y + FBp) – Open groups (FB) [music/age] – Encourage self organizing• Approach - oriented to scale learning system to harness collective intelligence
  • If we knew everything weneeded to know……we wouldnt need any data
  • Where are you…..we…..
  • 7 Giant Metaphors Metaphors 7 Deep Connection Transformation Balance Container Control Resource JourneyFrom: “Marketing Metaphoria” by Gerald and Lindsay Zaltman (ISBN 9781422121153 )
  • The LEARNING Metaphors 7 Deep Metaphors Transformation Balance Container Control
  • The Journey and balance… Small groupsSignal big conversationsNoise Order Me Chaos TeamProject Capture and Org freedomEverything The power of large groups and simple
  • Why can it work?• Familiarity with tools• Already considered an accepted method of communication• The new paradigm of ‘social content’ can be leveraged for learning and development• Everyone who uses a social site is part of the “we”
  • Why use SM focused internally? Awareness Attention Connection Focus Collaboration
  • What phases drive a solution?Understand Align Motivate Thread
  • What are we really trying to do?
  • Where do I start?• Get top cover• Discuss risks• Interface early adopters• …start the journey
  • Create the Connections• Open meeting + key stakeholders• Educate through shared experiences• Discuss: – What SM means – What learning means – Key problems/goals the group aims to tackle
  • What do I do next?• Pick a tool that doesn’t take an IT revolution• Pick ‘startup’ group• Meet and lay the ground rules and goals• Roll with it…• Coach• Add the next group….• Iterate
  • How do I grow the group?• Find a recurring daily time to read/post• Keep leadership engaged• Define a facilitator/motivator/champion• Connect the connectors• Find a daily/weekly/monthly theme• 3 word, real world reinforcements
  • Encourage Effective Lead Contribution• Framing Questions• Consistent Comments• Explicit Goals• Shared Experiences (links, videos, etc.)
  • How do I grow itbeyond startup? …scale it?
  • Enabling and encouraging participation in inter-firm knowledgeflows, while ensuring appropriate guidance and governance, willhelp generate a robust network of relationships across internaland external participants, creating opportunities for the"productive friction" that shapes learning as people withdifferent backgrounds and skill sets engage with each other onreal problems.1- Deloitte – “Measuring the Forces of Deep Change: 2009 Shift Index”2- John Hagel III and John Seely Brown – “Productive Friction: How Difficult Partnerships can Accelerate Innovation”, Harvard Business Review, 2005
  • Knowledge Flows
  • A Simple Activity ModelSource: “Enterprise modeling of a project-oriented fractal company for SMEs networking”, Canavesio, Martinez (2007)
  • Project-Oriented Network Analyzer Planner Reporter Monitor Executor Knowledge Base Managed End or Means Team UnitSource: “Enterprise modeling of a project-oriented fractal company for SMEs networking”, Canavesio, Martinez (2007)
  • shared or group intelligence that emerges from the collaboration and competition of many individuals and appears in consensus decision makingFrom www.wikipedia.com For more on CI: cci.mit.edu
  • Collective Intelligence Components Acting Openness Globally Sharing Peering
  • Collective Intelligence…wisdom of the ____ Crowd Swarm Experts
  • Collaborative Innovation Networks (COINs)• Interaction of like-minded, self-motivated individuals who share the same vision• Innovative ideas …..charismatic leaders, and a group of highly motivated collaborators• A broad range of skills and expertise• Not necessarily the corporate hierarchy• Work outside of the formal organization• Initially invisible• Want to be part of the innovation that “will change the world.”
  • Collaborative Learning Networks (CLN)• Community made of people inclined to share knowledge and practices• Benefit reciprocally from personal mastery and the collective knowledge accumulation of a group of attitudinally similar people.• Is aggregated to discuss the new idea• Learn by exchanging information and experiences about the purpose or the application of the new idea• Work in a collaborative way on development of new ideas
  • Collaborative Interest Networks (CIN)• Composed of people who have the same interests but don’t perform common work in a virtual team;• Community is very frequent on the web,• Has a lot of silent members, who keep information from web sites, portals, forum, and a few active members who are inclined to share their knowledge and experiences within the community.• The diaphragm that separates and links the innovation to the real world.
  • Collaborative Knowledge Networks Apple iPhone Developers Iphone Users Everyone elseSource: www.ickn.org
  • The Organization is not the Org Chart…
  • Considerations for Design• Structure• Themes and timing• Goals vs. Problems• Ends vs. Means• Compartments• Flow
  • Approaches for Design• Structure/Communities/Topics• By Functions• Crowd, swarm, or experts• By Tools• Hybrids
  • Analysis and planning change• Network flow• Measurement/Contribution/…• Themes / Problems…• Brokering• Semantic Spaces• Metaphors
  • Resources• “The Design of Business” – ISBN 9781422177808• MIT Center for Collective Intelligence – cci.mit.edu• Innovative Collaborative Knowledge Networks – www.ickn.org• “Swarm Creativity” - ISBN 0195304128• “Coolhunting” - ISBN 0814473865• “Marketing Metaphoria” - ISBN 9781422121153• “Enterprise modeling of a project-oriented fractal company for SMEs networking” – Canavesio, Martinez (2007) Michael Hruska, CEO mike@problemsolutions.net @mikehruska www.problemsolutions.net