Using Web 2.0 for OUTSIDE INnovation Patricia Seybold, Founder and CEO, Patricia Seybold Group STM - London December 7, 2007
What are the Patterns of Web 2.0? Web 2.0 Social Networking Customer-Contributed Content Executable Web Syndication Publis...
What are Business Customers Doing?? Organizing Rating Creating Designing Publishing Subscribing Finding Promoting Sharing
Web 2.0: Short-Term Memory Aids <ul><li>Five Roles that Customers want to Play </li></ul><ul><li>Five Steps to Success in ...
Guides  Contributors  Consultants  Lead customers  Promoters  5 Roles Customers Naturally Play
Readers act as Guides  By Tagging Scientific and Medical Info
www.alexanderstreet.com Stephen Rhind-Tutt, President
Playlists
 
Semantic Indexing… Author Birth date Death date Birth Place Death Place Nationality Occupation Awards (38 fields) Theater ...
 
Popularity Effectiveness Folksonomies Taxonomies Taxonomy + Folksonomy
When EVERYONE tags, discovery is fun!
Everyone is Contributing;  Shared Services Make Findability and Re Use Easy
Edmunds.com’s Customers Write “How To’s”
Customers Create Mash Ups
Mozilla is Designed by Users
Mozilla is QA’d by Users
Mozilla is Supported by Users
Mozilla is Promoted by Users
50% of NIs’ New Products Come from Lead Customers 50% of National Instruments’ Products are designed by its Customers and ...
Next generation games:  Co-designed by Lead Customers and Contributors
Customers’ Virtual Creations Go Physical
Customers create products for others to sell
Karmaloop’s Lead Customers:  Find and Model Urban Streetwear
Karmaloop Community Finds and Reps the Products 10,000 Karmaloop Customers are its Promoters  (and its Sales Reps!)
Karmaloop’s Lead Customers Strut their Stuff as Designers
B2B Customers are Rolling Up Their Sleeves <ul><li>Customers/End-Users: </li></ul><ul><li>Authors </li></ul><ul><li>Resear...
Five Steps to Success in B2B Web 2.0 <ul><li>Focus on findability (people, resources, answers). </li></ul><ul><li>Solicit ...
National Instruments’ Customers have Embraced 2.0
Search: Optical Nanotechnology Motion Control
Rate & Review Submissions
Search: Sound Signal Acquisition
 
Customers use NI’s LabVIEW to Create Courses
View Customer Profiles: Find Resources
WHAT IS THE TERMINAL VELOCITY OF A SNOWFLAKE? So as I am watching the snow fly horizontally outside my window, it occured ...
Well you will have to watch out when you use vision pattern recognition...because as everyone knows, every snowflake is un...
A snowflake vision system would require LV-RT and not be a precise estimate of speed. The feeling of the snow coming to an...
Ben wrote: 2) Measured the angle the snow's impact vector with the ground Remember that the wind speed is a  3D vector and...
After reading Ben’s post, I had to point out that he was really re-inventing Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which I use...
Take-Aways from National Instruments <ul><li>Good use of federated search and metadata for findability across applications...
Connexions’ Users are Harnessing Web 2.0
Take-Aways from Connexions <ul><li>Make it easy for contributors to create, organize and link well-structured content. </l...
Staples’ Customers are Leveraging 2.0
Staples’ Customers Categorize Products
Staples’ Customers Rate & Review Products
Take-Aways from Staples <ul><li>Customers are happy to review even the most mundane products. </li></ul><ul><li>There is v...
Dell’s Customers are Driving  Web 2.0
 
 
 
Dell’s Contributors Add Value thru How To’s
Dell Service Tag Widget: Customer-Created
Take-Aways from Dell <ul><li>If you enable customers to vote on ideas, you need to be prepared to act on them. </li></ul><...
National Semiconductor’s Rich Internet Apps
WEBENCH ®  Flash-based Online Design and Prototyping Environment Select Part Enter Specifications 1.  Choose a Part For Po...
Customers Use National’s Tools to Design
National Semiconductor’s WEBENCH   Toolkit  Application Resources System Overview Diagram Layout Sortable Selection Guide...
WEBENCH® HotWire  Opens Up Any Design HotWire
Virtual Designs Save Precious Time Now (Hours) Then (Weeks)
Customer Influenced Design Cycle Product Line, 3 rd  Parties, WW Design Centers  Capture Designs Product Application Desig...
Take-Aways from National Semiconductor <ul><li>Invest in core services with perceived high value (empower customers to ach...
How are Customers Creating Value? <ul><li>For themselves? </li></ul><ul><li>For other customers? </li></ul><ul><li>For bus...
1. They Rate, Review, Recommend, Vote <ul><li>Review products, books, articles, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Rate products, post...
 
2. Customers Tag, Organize, Make Collections <ul><li>Tag Photos, Films, Products </li></ul><ul><li>Tag Books, Journals, Ar...
 
 
 
 
 
3.They Publish, Subscribe, Re-Use, Syndicate <ul><li>Create and publish feeds, subscribe to feeds </li></ul><ul><li>Publis...
 
4. Contribute and Share:  Strut their Stuff!   <ul><ul><li>Create & Post in Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and Ed...
 
5.Hack, Extend, Combine, Create “Mash Ups”  <ul><li>Mix and match multimedia, create mash ups of music, video, etc. </li><...
GuyzNight’s Mash-Up Hits it Big
 
How to Harness Customer Innovation
5 Customer-Critical Services <ul><li>Business Customers need to be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Search within and across col...
5 Final Thoughts <ul><li>It’s really easy for anyone to create new value and derivative works by leveraging all the shared...
5 Final Thoughts <ul><li>Customer communities are central to the Web 2.0 experience </li></ul><ul><li>Customers are contri...
Patty’s Widgets/Gadgets
Patricia Seybold CEO, Consultant, and Author [email_address] 617.912.3107 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons L...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Using Web 2.0 For Outside I Nnovation Seybold Stm Dec 07

4,624 views
4,580 views

Published on

Speech given at the Society of Technical, Scholarly and Medical Publishers in London on December 7, 2007

Published in: Business, Technology

Using Web 2.0 For Outside I Nnovation Seybold Stm Dec 07

  1. 1. Using Web 2.0 for OUTSIDE INnovation Patricia Seybold, Founder and CEO, Patricia Seybold Group STM - London December 7, 2007
  2. 2. What are the Patterns of Web 2.0? Web 2.0 Social Networking Customer-Contributed Content Executable Web Syndication Published APIs Web Services Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds, Atom Multimedia Photos, Videos, Animation, Audio, Text Rich Internet Apps XML Blogs, Wikis Mash Ups Podcasts Flash, Flex , Ajax Ruby on Rails, Python JavaScript Amazon S3 Google Earth icalendar Gadgets, Widgets Sharing Meta Tags Tagging Linking
  3. 3. What are Business Customers Doing?? Organizing Rating Creating Designing Publishing Subscribing Finding Promoting Sharing
  4. 4. Web 2.0: Short-Term Memory Aids <ul><li>Five Roles that Customers want to Play </li></ul><ul><li>Five Steps to Success in B2B Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Five Ways in which Customers are Creating Value </li></ul><ul><li>Five Customer-Critical Services You Should be Leveraging </li></ul><ul><li>Five Final Thoughts </li></ul>
  5. 5. Guides Contributors Consultants Lead customers Promoters 5 Roles Customers Naturally Play
  6. 6. Readers act as Guides By Tagging Scientific and Medical Info
  7. 7. www.alexanderstreet.com Stephen Rhind-Tutt, President
  8. 8. Playlists
  9. 10. Semantic Indexing… Author Birth date Death date Birth Place Death Place Nationality Occupation Awards (38 fields) Theater District Location Capacity Style Etc… (18 fields) Company Name Productions Performers Etc… (14 fields) Production Director Theater Cast # of Perfs. Lighting Costumes Etc… (47 fields) Characters Plays Age Author Performer Etc… (30 fields) Scenes Where When Setting Subject Etc… (41 fields) Resources Play Director Theater Production Co. Character Scene Etc… (45 fields) Texts Keyword Author Date Written Date Published Production (67 fields) Give me scenes about AIDS written by South African authors in the past 5 years….
  10. 12. Popularity Effectiveness Folksonomies Taxonomies Taxonomy + Folksonomy
  11. 13. When EVERYONE tags, discovery is fun!
  12. 14. Everyone is Contributing; Shared Services Make Findability and Re Use Easy
  13. 15. Edmunds.com’s Customers Write “How To’s”
  14. 16. Customers Create Mash Ups
  15. 17. Mozilla is Designed by Users
  16. 18. Mozilla is QA’d by Users
  17. 19. Mozilla is Supported by Users
  18. 20. Mozilla is Promoted by Users
  19. 21. 50% of NIs’ New Products Come from Lead Customers 50% of National Instruments’ Products are designed by its Customers and its Ecosystem Customers and Partners Contribute their own Engineering Applications to the Community Lead User Community drives product development Customers Identify and Prioritize all Feature Requests for R&D
  20. 22. Next generation games: Co-designed by Lead Customers and Contributors
  21. 23. Customers’ Virtual Creations Go Physical
  22. 24. Customers create products for others to sell
  23. 25. Karmaloop’s Lead Customers: Find and Model Urban Streetwear
  24. 26. Karmaloop Community Finds and Reps the Products 10,000 Karmaloop Customers are its Promoters (and its Sales Reps!)
  25. 27. Karmaloop’s Lead Customers Strut their Stuff as Designers
  26. 28. B2B Customers are Rolling Up Their Sleeves <ul><li>Customers/End-Users: </li></ul><ul><li>Authors </li></ul><ul><li>Researchers </li></ul><ul><li>Scientists </li></ul><ul><li>Seekers </li></ul><ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><li>Professors </li></ul><ul><li>Librarians (University, Corporate, Public, Govt) </li></ul><ul><li>Individual Subscribers </li></ul><ul><li>Acting as: </li></ul><ul><li>Contributors </li></ul><ul><li>Guides </li></ul><ul><li>Consultants </li></ul><ul><li>Promoters </li></ul><ul><li>Lead Users </li></ul><ul><li>And as: </li></ul><ul><li>Inventors </li></ul><ul><li>Subject Matter Experts </li></ul><ul><li>Lexicographers </li></ul><ul><li>Publishers </li></ul>
  27. 29. Five Steps to Success in B2B Web 2.0 <ul><li>Focus on findability (people, resources, answers). </li></ul><ul><li>Solicit customers’ reviews, ratings and opinions to save others’ time. </li></ul><ul><li>Empower users to classify and organize content, build collections, and add resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Nurture community, social networks, and communities of practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Get lead users to strut their stuff, using your IP to build their IP. </li></ul>
  28. 30. National Instruments’ Customers have Embraced 2.0
  29. 31. Search: Optical Nanotechnology Motion Control
  30. 32. Rate & Review Submissions
  31. 33. Search: Sound Signal Acquisition
  32. 35. Customers use NI’s LabVIEW to Create Courses
  33. 36. View Customer Profiles: Find Resources
  34. 37. WHAT IS THE TERMINAL VELOCITY OF A SNOWFLAKE? So as I am watching the snow fly horizontally outside my window, it occured to me that that if   1) I knew the terminal velocity of a snow flake   2) Measured the angle the snow's impact vector with the ground   3) and applied a little trig   I could estimate the wind’s speed.   So does anyone know the terminal velocity of a snow flake?   Ben   PS Add a vision system and I could automate the measurement.
  35. 38. Well you will have to watch out when you use vision pattern recognition...because as everyone knows, every snowflake is unique!     although looking out my window at a field of now deep snow...I’m doubting that theory. However I would need a lot more free time before I headed outside to search for two identical snowflakes....   Ben the other way to estimate the wind speed is www.theweathernetwork.com       As for your question, I would have to say the terminal velocity would be affected quite heavily by snow consistency and flake size. You might also have to compensate for noisy data, since snowflakes 'tumble' (which would mess with your vector).   Furthermore since you are looking out of a building, your results would be effected by the updraft from the wind being deflected by the building. (Just a warning in case your results lead you to believe there is a hurricane in progress and you try to convince your coworkers to take cover).
  36. 39. A snowflake vision system would require LV-RT and not be a precise estimate of speed. The feeling of the snow coming to an abrupt stop against you face is a bit more accurate..  How fast your face freezes is another.. Or you could always get one of those turbine thingy that has a speed transducer on it.  Your whirly-wind hat with an hall-effect sensor should do the trick! You know the diameter where the sensor is mounted, the rest is simple math.  Use a graph to show wind bursts and velocity transitions! Jeff, you could present that project at the next LV User Group meeting!! 
  37. 40. Ben wrote: 2) Measured the angle the snow's impact vector with the ground Remember that the wind speed is a 3D vector and you're only measuring the projection perpendicular to the view direction.   Not to mention the &quot;ground effects&quot;. You need to measure the angle away from any surfaces.   You could measure the trajectories with two cameras pointing 90° apart and fit the 3D trajectories to a model function that you then can extrapolate to an infinite distance away from the ground.       Maybe you should stick to some doppler radar setup.    
  38. 41. After reading Ben’s post, I had to point out that he was really re-inventing Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which I used quite a bit in my Artificial Organs past. The snow already exists as a particle in the fluid of study This link support's Altenbach's requirement for a second camera. http:// darwin.bio.uci.edu/~edrucker/home/dpiv.htm Here is the kind of thing I had done, with hearts and arteries and so on: http:// www.ladhyx.polytechnique.fr/activities/bio_en.html Both of these images are 2D, but 3-D reconstruction is also done, it is just MUCH more processor intensive - No real time results as JoeLabView said! It gets really exciting when you have porous media (imagine the snow blowing through a tightly-packed cornfield...): http:// medschool.umaryland.edu/artificial_organs/pump_comp.asp -Mello
  39. 42. Take-Aways from National Instruments <ul><li>Good use of federated search and metadata for findability across applications. </li></ul><ul><li>Customers rate everything! </li></ul><ul><li>Customers contribute their own applications and intellectual property to the community. </li></ul><ul><li>Vibrant cross-disciplinary customer community of engineers and scientists. </li></ul><ul><li>Social networking is key to locating expert resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Strong ecosystem of customers, SME’s and partners </li></ul>
  40. 43. Connexions’ Users are Harnessing Web 2.0
  41. 44. Take-Aways from Connexions <ul><li>Make it easy for contributors to create, organize and link well-structured content. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide collaborative authoring tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage popular standards and services: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OpenID </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative Commons </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slideshare.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>YouTube </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Make rights management of customer-contributed content clear and fair. </li></ul>
  42. 45. Staples’ Customers are Leveraging 2.0
  43. 46. Staples’ Customers Categorize Products
  44. 47. Staples’ Customers Rate & Review Products
  45. 48. Take-Aways from Staples <ul><li>Customers are happy to review even the most mundane products. </li></ul><ul><li>There is value to others in having customers rate and review products. </li></ul><ul><li>Customer reviews are used in the physical stores. </li></ul><ul><li>A “closed customer community” creates and evolves the merchandise categories for the Web and the store. Customer categorization increased online revenues by 30%. </li></ul><ul><li>First widget was the “Easy Button.” </li></ul>
  46. 49. Dell’s Customers are Driving Web 2.0
  47. 53. Dell’s Contributors Add Value thru How To’s
  48. 54. Dell Service Tag Widget: Customer-Created
  49. 55. Take-Aways from Dell <ul><li>If you enable customers to vote on ideas, you need to be prepared to act on them. </li></ul><ul><li>Customers want control over how dialogs and discussions are displayed </li></ul><ul><li>Customers will spend amazing amounts of time creating videos and tutorials </li></ul><ul><li>Pro: A separate customer-generated content site is easy to police and maintain </li></ul><ul><li>Con: Customers prefer a more seamless experience of user-generated and expert-generated content </li></ul>
  50. 56. National Semiconductor’s Rich Internet Apps
  51. 57. WEBENCH ® Flash-based Online Design and Prototyping Environment Select Part Enter Specifications 1. Choose a Part For Power, Amplifiers, Audio, Data Conversion, and RF/Wireless 2. Create a Design Custom Prototype Kit Overnight Prototype 4. Build It! Generate Schematic/ Electrical Analysis Generate Layout/ Thermal Analysis 3. Analyze a Design
  52. 58. Customers Use National’s Tools to Design
  53. 59. National Semiconductor’s WEBENCH  Toolkit Application Resources System Overview Diagram Layout Sortable Selection Guide WEBENCH Simulation
  54. 60. WEBENCH® HotWire Opens Up Any Design HotWire
  55. 61. Virtual Designs Save Precious Time Now (Hours) Then (Weeks)
  56. 62. Customer Influenced Design Cycle Product Line, 3 rd Parties, WW Design Centers Capture Designs Product Application Design Centers & Field Application Engineers Modify Designs Proposals, App Notes, Reference Designs In Library
  57. 63. Take-Aways from National Semiconductor <ul><li>Invest in core services with perceived high value (empower customers to achieve their outcomes) </li></ul><ul><li>Embed your IP; Deliver Innovation Toolkits </li></ul><ul><li>Give tools/services away </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver immediate tangible results (physical goods) </li></ul><ul><li>Make tools hackable </li></ul><ul><li>Make tools ubiquitous (online & offline) </li></ul>
  58. 64. How are Customers Creating Value? <ul><li>For themselves? </li></ul><ul><li>For other customers? </li></ul><ul><li>For businesses? </li></ul>
  59. 65. 1. They Rate, Review, Recommend, Vote <ul><li>Review products, books, articles, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Rate products, posts, people’s ideas, people’s contributions, solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Recommend to a colleague, view automatically generated recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Vote on posts, articles, customer contributions, new product ideas, proposed solutions </li></ul>
  60. 67. 2. Customers Tag, Organize, Make Collections <ul><li>Tag Photos, Films, Products </li></ul><ul><li>Tag Books, Journals, Articles </li></ul><ul><li>Organize and Share Resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Records, Archives, Datafeeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Methods, Recipes, Protocols </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Create Collections </li></ul>
  61. 73. 3.They Publish, Subscribe, Re-Use, Syndicate <ul><li>Create and publish feeds, subscribe to feeds </li></ul><ul><li>Publish or Subscribe to specific events/triggers/alerts </li></ul><ul><li>Publish or Subscribe to changes they care about </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Updates </li></ul><ul><li>Subscribe to state changes: price, availability, movement, traffic patterns, stock prices, etc. </li></ul>
  62. 75. 4. Contribute and Share: Strut their Stuff! <ul><ul><li>Create & Post in Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and Edit Wikis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contribute Photographs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contribute Videos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and Share Music </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create Podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and Share Designs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and Share Information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and Share Applications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and Share Gadgets & Widgets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research and share findings </li></ul></ul>
  63. 77. 5.Hack, Extend, Combine, Create “Mash Ups” <ul><li>Mix and match multimedia, create mash ups of music, video, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Mix and match information feeds and applications </li></ul><ul><li>Map Data Sets together </li></ul><ul><li>Interlink Data Sets or Feeds </li></ul><ul><li>Combine Applications using APIs and Service requests </li></ul><ul><li>Interlink Applications </li></ul>
  64. 78. GuyzNight’s Mash-Up Hits it Big
  65. 80. How to Harness Customer Innovation
  66. 81. 5 Customer-Critical Services <ul><li>Business Customers need to be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Search within and across collections and networked resources using semantics, parameters and folksonomy. </li></ul><ul><li>Create and share custom collections (playlists) and derivative works (mash ups). </li></ul><ul><li>Custom-configure, extend and create new applications and designs. </li></ul><ul><li>Take information + functionality anywhere. </li></ul><ul><li>Subscribe to updates. Publish updates. </li></ul>
  67. 82. 5 Final Thoughts <ul><li>It’s really easy for anyone to create new value and derivative works by leveraging all the shared services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Google, YouTube, Flickr, OpenID, CrossRef, Eventful, WidgetBox, Wikipedia, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There are lots of “Roll Your Own” Community, Blog and Wiki tools that make it easy for anyone to create new “long tail” experiences </li></ul>
  68. 83. 5 Final Thoughts <ul><li>Customer communities are central to the Web 2.0 experience </li></ul><ul><li>Customers are contributing about 20% of value to most Web businesses today </li></ul><ul><li>Customers will contribute 50% of value from Web businesses by the end of the year! </li></ul>
  69. 84. Patty’s Widgets/Gadgets
  70. 85. Patricia Seybold CEO, Consultant, and Author [email_address] 617.912.3107 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. You may re-use any of these slides or the images on them as long as you attribute them to: 2007 - Patricia Seybold Group, www.psgroup.com Patricia Seybold Group Boston, MA 02129 617.742.5200 www.psgroup.com www.outsideinnovation.blogs.com

×