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  • 18 November 2011
  • 18 November 2011 Part Two. MATERIALS AND SET-UP OF EQUIPMENT, INSTRUMENTS AND OTHER DEVICES 9. Specifications archive 9.1 A specifications archive is recommended for every pharmaceutical control laboratory. Current versions of all specifications necessary should be kept in accordance with the national legislation, as described in pharmacopoeial compendia or in manufacturers' registration documents. 9.2 Content 9.2.1 The specifications archive must contain (a) list of all pharmacopoeias in the laboratory i. all updates and corrections must be noted in the principal volumes to prevent the use of obsolete sections. Additional or replacement pages for loose-leaf publications must be inserted immediately after receipt; pages no longer valid must be removed; ii. adequate numbers of supplements and addenda must be ensured. (b) file of non-pharmacopoeial quality specifications for drugs tested to specifications, established either by the manufacturer or by the laboratory itself and approved by the Authority i. each entry must be numbered and dated as to easily recognize the latest version; ii. the version in the archive file (master copy) must bear the date of approval by the national registration authority or the specific unit and contain any other information relevant to the status of the quality specifications; iii. all subsequent corrections or changes must be entered in the master copy and endorsed with the persons' name, signature and the date. A revised document should be produced as soon as possible.
  • 18 November 2011 9.3 Forwarding of documents from the specifications archive. The master copy should not be released from the archive; photocopies must be accounted for and controlled for laboratory use. 9.4 Confidentiality of manufacturers’ specifications. Manufacturers' specifications are the property of the company. Often they are made available to governments strictly for the purpose of assessing application for marketing authorization. The pharmaceutical control laboratory may need to negotiate their release with manufacturers or even, in some cases, to develop independent specifications. National laboratories may be asked routinely to give their opinion on the specifications for each newly introduced pharmaceutical product before being authorized for marketing by the drug regulatory authority. 9.5 In a large laboratory the specifications archive supervisor provides a documentation service and has the responsibility for (a) updating all pharmacopoeias - including supplements, addenda, and corrective measures used in the laboratory; (b) maintaining a specifications file for all drugs authorized for marketing within the country.
  • 18 November 2011 10. Reagents 10.1 All reagents, chemicals, including solvents and materials used in tests and assays must be of appropriate quality. 10.2 Purchase. Reagents must be purchased from reputable manufacturers or dealers, accompanied with the certificate of analysis. In some cases, a list of pre-qualified suppliers has to be established. 10.3 Preparation of reagents in the laboratory 10.3.1 Clear responsibility must be given within the job description of the person assigned for the preparation of reagents in the laboratory. 10.3.2 Prescribed procedures must be used and, when available, according to published pharmacopoeial or other standards. Records should be maintained for the preparation, and standardization of volumetric solutions.
  • 18 November 2011 10.4 Labels. The label must clearly specify (a) the contents, the manufacturer, the date received, and as appropriate, the concentration, standardization factor, shelf-life and storage conditions. Reagents prepared in the laboratory, must state the date of preparation, and give the name and initials of the responsible technician; (b) for volumetric solutions prepared by dilution, the name of the manufacturer of the original reagent, the date of preparation, the date of standardization and factor, and identify the responsible technician. 10.5 Transportation and subdivision 10.5.1 Reagents must not be moved unnecessarily from unit to unit. 10.5.2 Whenever possible, transportation must be done in the original containers. 10.5.3 When subdivided, the transfer must always be done in scrupulously clean, fully labelled containers.
  • 18 November 2011 10.6 Inspection 10.6.1 All reagent containers must be inspected to ensure that seals are intact both when delivered to the central store and when distributed to the units. 10.6.2 These inspections must be recorded on the label giving the date, name and initials. 10.6.3 Reagents appearing to have been tampered with should be rejected, which could exceptionally be waived if the identity and purity can be confirmed by testing. 10.6.4 Distilled water and deionized water 10.6.4.1 Water should be considered as a reagent. 10.6.4.2 Precautions must be taken to avoid contamination during its supply, storage and distribution. 10.6.4.3 Stocks must be verified regularly to ensure pharmacopoeial and other official requirements for quality.
  • 18 November 2011 10.7 Storage 10.7.1 Stocks of reagents must be maintained in a central store taking into account the storage conditions. 10.7.1.1 The store must contain a supply of clean bottles, vials, spoons, funnels, and labels required for dispensing reagents from larger to smaller containers. Special equipment may be needed for the transfer of larger volumes of corrosive liquids. 10.7.2 The function of a store keeper must be defined. 10.7.2.1 The responsibility of the person is to look after and tend the central store and its inventory. The expiry date of chemicals and reagents should be observed. Training may be needed in handling chemicals with the necessary care and safety. 10.7.3 The laboratory must provide for the purpose of storage separate rooms or areas for flammable substances, for fuming and concentrated acids, bases, volatile amines and others, such as hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, ammonia, and bromine. Self-igniting materials, such as metallic sodium and potassium, must also be stored separately.
  • 18 November 2011 11. Reference materials 11.1 Reference materials (7, 8) (for example, official reference substances and reference preparations, secondary reference materials and non-official materials prepared in the laboratory as working standards) are necessary for the testing and/or calibration, validation or verification of a sample or equipment, instruments or other devices. 11.2 Registration and labelling 11.2.1 An identification number must be assigned to all reference materials, whether newly delivered or prepared. 11.2.2 A new identification number must be assigned to each new batch. 11.2.3 The number must be marked on each vial of the material. 11.2.4 The identification number must be quoted on the analytical worksheet at every use of the material (see Part Three. 15.4).
  • 18 November 2011 11.3 Central register 11.3.1 Details concerning all reference materials required are compiled in a central register, which may be a record book, a card file, or data processing equipment. 11.3.2 The central register must provide the following information: (a) identification number of the material (b) precise description of the material (c) source (d) date of receipt (e) batch designation or other identification code (f) intended use of the material (e.g. as an infrared reference material, as an impurity reference material for thin-layer chromatography, etc.) (g) location of storage in the laboratory, and any special storage conditions (h) further indications (e.g. results of inspections).
  • 18 November 2011 11.4 Information file 11.4.1 In addition to the central register, a file must be kept containing all information on the properties of each reference material. 11.4.2 For working standards prepared in the laboratory, the file must include the results of all tests and verifications used to establish the standard, and initialled by the responsible analyst. 11.5 Inspection 11.5.1 All reference materials must be inspected at regular intervals to assure deterioration has not occurred and appropriate storage conditions are being observed. 11.5.2 The results of these inspections must be recorded in the central register and/or the information file, and initialled by the responsible analyst. 11.6 Further guidance. The general guideline on the establishment, maintenance and distribution of reference materials gives further details on the handling and storage of reference materials (7). A compilation of national, regional and international reference substances is also kept up-to-date at the Secretariat and is available (8).
  • 18 November 2011 12. Calibration, validation and verification of equipment, instruments and other devices 12.1 Regular calibration, validation and verification of all equipment, instruments and other devices used to measure the physical properties of substances must be performed. 12.2 Specific procedures for each type of equipment, instrument and other devices must be established, having regard to the extent of which they are used, verified and calibrated at regular intervals according to SOP.
  • 18 November 2011
  • 18 November 2011 12.3 Only authorized personnel must operate equipment, instruments and devices. Up-to-date instructions on the use, maintenance, verification and calibration of equipment, instruments and devices (including any relevant manuals provided by the manufacturer) must be readily available for use by the appropriate laboratory personnel (e.g. a copy of these instructions should be placed beside each apparatus together with a schedule of the dates on which it is due for verification and calibration). The results of verification must be recorded on a control chart, forming the basis for the time of calibration. 12.4 Each item of equipment, instrument and other devices used for testing, verification and calibration, used for obtaining the results must, when practicable, be uniquely identified. 12.5 Records must be maintained of each item of equipment, instrument and other devices significant to the tests and/or verification/calibration performed. The records must include at least the following: (a) name of equipment, instrument and other devices (b) manufacturer's name, type identification, serial number or other unique identification (c) verification/calibration to comply with the specifications (d) current location, where appropriate (e) the manufacturer's instructions, if available, or reference to their location (f) dates, results and copies of reports, verifications and certificates of all calibrations, adjustments, acceptance criteria, and due date of next verification/calibration (g) maintenance carried out to date and the maintenance plan (h) history of any damage, malfunction, modification or repair. It is also recommended to keep records and additional observations of the time, the equipment, instruments or devices were used.
  • 18 November 2011 12.5 Records must be maintained of each item of equipment, instrument and other devices significant to the tests and/or verification/calibration performed. The records must include at least the following: (a) name of equipment, instrument and other devices (b) manufacturer's name, type identification, serial number or other unique identification (c) verification/calibration to comply with the specifications (d) current location, where appropriate (e) the manufacturer's instructions, if available, or reference to their location (f) dates, results and copies of reports, verifications and certificates of all calibrations, adjustments, acceptance criteria, and due date of next verification/calibration (g) maintenance carried out to date and the maintenance plan (h) history of any damage, malfunction, modification or repair. It is also recommended to keep records and additional observations of the time, the equipment, instruments or devices were used.
  • 18 November 2011
  • 18 November 2011 12.6 To prevent contamination or deterioration, the laboratory must perform systematic verifications, have procedures and an established plan for safe handling, transport, storage, use and maintenance of measuring equipment to ensure proper functioning. 12.7 Maintenance procedures must be established (regular servicing must be arranged by a team of maintenance specialists, internal or external, whenever possible). 12.8 Equipment, instruments and other devices, either subjected to overloading, mishandling, giving suspect results, shown to be defective or outside specified limits, must be taken out of service, and clearly labelled or marked. Wherever possible they must be kept until repaired and shown by calibration or test to perform correctly. 12.9 All equipment, instruments and other devices under the control of the laboratory and requiring calibration must be labelled, coded or otherwise identified to indicate the status of calibration and the date when recalibration is due. 12.10 When the equipment, instruments and other devices are outside the direct control of the laboratory for a certain period of time, the laboratory must ensure that their function and calibration status are verified and shown to be satisfactory before being returned to service.
  • 18 November 2011 12.11 Depending on the types of analytical equipment, instruments and other devices, their fragility, the extent to which they are used, and the skills required to operate them, they can be either (a) grouped together (b) dispersed between the various units (c) protected from extreme states of humidity or temperature in a specially designed area and (d) adequately protected to be resistant to corrosion and against mould and fungal growth. 12.12 Further guidance 12.12.1 Procedures for verifying and calibrating refractometers, thermometers used in determinations of melting temperatures, and potentiometers for pH determinations are given in The International Pharmacopoeia (9). Methods for verifying the reliability of scales for ultraviolet and infrared spectrophotometers and spectrofluorometers are also described therein. 12.12.2 The document Validation of analytical procedures used in the examination of pharmaceutical materials gives chemical and physicochemical attributes (10) .
  • 18 November 2011 13. Traceability 13.1 Traceability aims at ensuring that results of laboratory measurements using procedures of lower metrological order are reproducible and scientifically acceptable by referring to an internationally agreed denominator by means of a reference procedure of highest metrological order and/or a primary reference material. Therefore, the analytical specificities of each measurement procedure and reference material that is used to ascertain traceability, must be known. A transfer protocol with a detailed description of the traceability chain, including measurement procedures and reference materials at all levels, must be prepared. The protocol must be meticulously followed to ensure the reproducibility of results. 13.2 Traceability takes into account that the validity of laboratory investigations is limited by uncertainties. Traceability applies to measurement procedures as well as to reference materials used for the calibration of measurement procedures. 13.3 For the majority of quantities a variety of measurement procedures have been developed to meet the requirements of the intended purpose of analysis.
  • 18 November 2011 13.4 There are quantitative and qualitative measurement procedures. (7) 13.4.1 Quantitative measurement procedures provide numerical results that vary in terms of their precision, accuracy, analytical sensitivity and selectivity of measurement. One can establish a hierarchy of procedures on the basis of accuracy of measurement: (a) A measurement procedure of the highest metrological order ( primary reference measurement procedure ) is used to quantitatively measure a quantity of known physicochemical structure with a negligible measurement error (bias). The result obtained by use of such a procedure, that some experts call a definitive method , is nearest to the Atrue value@. ( Examples: weighing, gas chromatography - mass spectrometry, isotope dilution techniques ). (b) A reference measurement procedure ( secondary reference measurement procedure ), the accuracy of which is assessed by: i. comparing the results of measurement by such a procedure with those of a measurement procedure of highest metrological order ii. calibration with an international reference material with an assigned value in arbitrary units iii. calibration with a primary reference material (e.g. International Chemical Reference Substance) ( Examples: flame photometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, assay methods ). (c) A routine measurement procedure ( selected measurement procedure ) measures with sufficient reliability and practicality for its intended purpose. The extent of systematic deviation of the results from their true value as determined by a routine measurement method, should be known. 13.4.2 “Semi-quantitative” measurement procedures provide results that are less accurate and less precise than quantitative measurement. ASemi-quantitative” measurement procedures measure a quantity in discrete concentration intervals. In pharmacopoeias these tests are referred to as “Limit tests”, comparison of response of test to response of reference at the limiting level. The intervals are expressed as rough estimates on an ordinal scale. In laboratory observations made after geometrical dilution of the specimen the results are expressed in terms of titres. Typically, there is no linear relation between the signal of observation and the concentration of the quantity. 13.4.3 Qualitative measurement procedures are descriptive. They may distinguish between the absence and presence of a quantity in samples. The results are provided on a nominal scale. The distinction between the presence and absence of the quantity in a sample is related to the ability of the measurement procedure to detect the quantity at a minimal concentration. The minimal concentration of a quantity that will be positively indicated by the test system (limit of detection), or the ability to quantify the analyte in the presence of other components of the specimen (limit of quantification), may vary from one test system to another. A different approach is used for pharmacopoeial standards and substances that are established and distributed by pharmacopoeial authorities who give the information provided by certificates of analysis together with expiry dates.
  • 18 November 2011 13.5.1 A designated primary chemical substance is one that is widely acknowledged to have the appropriate qualities within a specified context, and whose value is accepted without requiring comparison to another chemical substance. (7) 13.5.2 A secondary chemical reference substance is a substance whose characteristics are assigned and/or calibrated by comparison with a primary chemical reference substance. The extent of characterization and testing of a secondary chemical reference substance may be less than for a primary chemical reference substance. This definition may apply inter alia to some substances termed “working standards . 13.5.3 International Biological Standards are a category of biological reference material having World Health Organisation (WHO) status which have been exhaustively studied and which meet with demanding international (WHO) requirements for accuracy, consistency and stability and which are established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS). International Biological Standards are generally assigned potency values expressed in terms of International Units (IU) of biological activity, on the basis of an extensive international collaborative study.
  • 18 November 2011 13.5.4 A working standard ( working calibrator ) has an assigned value of a quantity using one or more selected measurement procedures. This calibrator is sometimes called “manufacturer’s master calibrator” or “in-house calibrator”. The working standard should demonstrate compatibility as regards the manufacturer’s selected measurement procedure and the procedure to be calibrated. 13.5.5 A manufacturer’s product calibrator is used for the calibration of a routine measurement procedure of an end user. 13.5.6 A control material is used to test for the precision and accuracy of results. A control material should have a matrix similar to the samples to be measured. Assigned values with an uncertainty of measurement appropriate to the intended use should be given.

Glp   qc labs Glp qc labs Presentation Transcript

  • Good Practices for Quality Control Laboratories Part 2: Materials and set-up of equipment, instruments and other devices Supplementary Training Modules on Good Manufacturing Practice WHO Technical Report Series, No. 902, 2002. Annex 3
    • Specifications archive
    • Current versions of all specifications – as described in pharmacopoeial compendia or in manufacturers' registration documents
    • The specifications archive must contain:
    • List of all pharmacopoeias in the laboratory
      • all updates and corrections must be noted
      • adequate numbers of supplements and addenda
    • File of non-pharmacopoeial quality specifications
      • numbered and dated, latest version
      • information relevant to the status of the quality specifications
      • corrections or changes appropriately handled, including producing a revised document as soon as possible
    Quality Control Part Two. 9.1 – 9.2
    • Specifications archive (2)
    • Use of the master copy
      • photocopies accounted for and controlled for use
    • Confidentiality of specifications
    • Responsibility defined for:
    • Updating all pharmacopoeias – including supplements, addenda, and corrective measures used in the laboratory
    • Maintaining a specifications file
    Quality Control Part Two. 9.3 – 9.5
    • Reagents
    • Reagents, chemicals, including solvents and materials used in tests and assays – of appropriate quality and supplied with COA
    • List of prequalified suppliers
    • Clear responsibility in job descriptions for the preparation of reagents in the laboratory
    • SOPs according to pharmacopoeia or other standards
    • Records for the preparation, and standardization of volumetric solutions
    Quality Control Part Two. 10.1 – 10.3
    • Reagent labels must clearly specify:
      • the contents, the manufacturer, the date received, and as appropriate, the concentration, standardization factor, shelf-life and storage conditions (purchased)
      • date of preparation, name and initials of person (if prepared in the laboratory)
    • Volumetric solutions:
      • the name of the manufacturer of the original reagent (where diluted), the date of preparation, the date of standardization and factor, and identify the responsible technician
    • Reagents must not be moved unnecessarily from unit to unit
    • Whenever possible, transportation in original containers
    • Subdivided in scrupulously clean, fully labelled containers
    Quality Control Part Two. 10.4-10.5
    • Inspect reagent containers when delivered (e.g. seals intact)
    • Inspection recorded on the label giving the date, name and initials
    • If tampered with, rejected, unless identity and purity can be confirmed
    • Distilled water and deionized water
    • Water should be considered as a reagent
    • Precautions to avoid contamination during:
      • supply, storage and distribution
    • To comply with pharmacopoeia and other official requirements for quality
    Quality Control Part Two. 10.6 - 10.11
    • Storage
    • Appropriate storage conditions
    • Storage area with clean bottles, vials, spoons, funnels, and labels required for dispensing reagents from larger to smaller containers
    • Store keeper responsibilities:
    • Store and inventory, expiry dates
    • Areas for flammable substances, for fuming and concentrated acids, etc.
    • Self-igniting materials, such as metallic sodium, stored separately
    Quality Control Part Two. 10.12 – 10.14
    • Reference materials
    • Used for testing and/or calibration, validation or verification of a sample or equipment, instruments or other devices
    • Responsibility must be assigned to a specific person
    • Registration and labelling with an identification number assigned
      • a new identification number to each new batch
      • number marked on each vial
      • quoted on the analytical worksheet at every use
    Quality Control Part Two. 11.1. – 11.5
    • Central register for reference materials containing information:
    • identification number of the material
    • precise description of the material
    • source
    • date of receipt
    • batch designation or other identification code
    • intended use of the material (e.g. as an infrared reference material, as an impurity reference material for thin-layer chromatography, etc.)
    • location of storage in the laboratory, and any special storage conditions
    • further indications (e.g. results of inspections)
    Quality Control Part Two. 11.7
    • Information file for reference materials containing information:
    • In addition to the central register – a file containing information on the properties of each reference material
    • Working standards – include the results of all tests and verifications
    • Inspection
    • Inspected at regular intervals, no deterioration, appropriate storage conditions
    • Inspections must be recorded in the central register and/or the information file
    • See also "The general guideline on the establishment, maintenance and distribution of reference materials"
    Quality Control Part Two. 11.10 – 11.14
    • Calibration, validation and verification of equipment, instruments and other devices
    • Regular calibration, validation and verification of all equipment, instruments and other devices used to measure the physical properties of substances must be performed
    • Specific procedures for each type of equipment, instrument and other devices must be established, having regard to the extent of which they are used, verified and calibrated at regular intervals according to SOP
    Quality Control Part Two. 12.1 - 12.2
    • Examples:
    • pH meters are verified with a certified solution at least once a day
    • Infrared spectrophotometers require verification at least once a day and calibration at regular intervals
    • Discuss other examples . . .
    Quality Control
    • Authorized personnel to operate equipment
    • Instructions on the use, maintenance, verification and calibration of equipment, instruments and devices (e.g. a copy placed beside each apparatus together with a schedule of the dates)
    • The results of verification must be recorded
    • Each item of equipment, instrument – uniquely identified
    • Records must be maintained
    Quality Control Part Two. 12.3 – 12.5
    • The records must include at least the following:
    • name of equipment, instrument and other devices
    • manufacturer's name, type identification, serial number or other unique identification
    • verification/calibration to comply with the specifications
    • current location, where appropriate
    • the manufacturer's instructions, if available, or reference to their location
    Quality Control Part Two. 12.5
    • The records must include at least the following (2):
    • dates, results and copies of reports, verifications and certificates of all calibrations, adjustments, acceptance criteria, and due date of next verification/calibration
    • maintenance carried out to date and the maintenance plan
    • history of any damage, malfunction, modification or repair. It is also recommended to keep records and additional observations of the time, the equipment, instruments or devices were used
    Quality Control Part Two. 12.5
    • Prevent contamination or deterioration – perform systematic verifications
    • Maintenance procedures and records
    • Defective instruments – taken out of service, and clearly labelled or marked
    • Status of calibration and the date when recalibration is due, indicated
    • Instruments to be satisfactory before being returned to service
    Quality Control Part Two. 12.6 – 12.10
    • Analytical equipment, instruments and other devices can be either
      • grouped together
      • dispersed between the various units
      • protected from extreme states of humidity or temperature in a specially designed area and
      • adequately protected to be resistant to corrosion and against mould and fungal growth
    • See also Procedures for verifying and calibrating instruments in The International Pharmacopoeia, and Validation of analytical procedures used in the examination of pharmaceutical materials gives chemical and physicochemical attributes
    Quality Control Part Two. 12.11 – 12.12
    • Traceability
    • Analytical specificities of each measurement procedure and reference material that is used to ascertain traceability, must be known
    • Traceability chain, including measurement procedures and reference materials at all levels, must be prepared
    • Laboratory investigations – applies to measurement procedures as well as to reference materials used
    Quality Control Part Two. 13.1 – 13.3
    • There are quantitative and qualitative measurement procedures
    • “ Semi-quantitative” measurement procedures
      • less accurate and less precise than quantitative measurement (“Limit tests”)
    • Qualitative measurement procedures are descriptive
    Quality Control Part Two. 13.4, 13.6 -13.7
    • Reference materials have assigned values of a quantity.
    • Hierarchy for reference materials:
    • Primary chemical substance
      • has appropriate qualities within a specified context, and whose value is accepted without requiring comparison to another chemical substance
    • Secondary chemical reference substance
      • characteristics are assigned and/or calibrated by comparison with a primary chemical reference substance. The extent of characterization and testing of a secondary chemical reference substance may be less than for a primary chemical reference substance. This definition may apply inter alia to some substances termed “working standards
    Quality Control Part Two. 13.8 (a-b)
    • International Biological Standards
      • a category of biological reference material having World Health Organization (WHO) status
    • A working standard ( working calibrator ) has an assigned value of a quantity
    • A manufacturer’s product calibrator is used for the calibration of a routine measurement procedure of an end user
    • A control material is used to test for the precision and accuracy of results. A control material should have a matrix similar to the samples to be measured. Assigned values with an uncertainty of measurement appropriate to the intended use should be given
    Quality Control Part Two. 13.8 (c-f)