Perceptions of E-Cigarettes Differ Greatly Between Smokers and Non-Smokers: Penn Schoen Berland
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Perceptions of E-Cigarettes Differ Greatly Between Smokers and Non-Smokers: Penn Schoen Berland

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With the debate heating up about e-cigarettes, PSB fielded a PSB Pulse Poll June 2-3, 2014, among 800 general population US consumers, to gauge familiarity, perceptions, and attitudes regarding ...

With the debate heating up about e-cigarettes, PSB fielded a PSB Pulse Poll June 2-3, 2014, among 800 general population US consumers, to gauge familiarity, perceptions, and attitudes regarding e-cigarettes among the general population, smokers, former-smokers, and non-smokers. Check out the key findings of this survey in Winning Knowledge section of Penn Schoen Berland

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Perceptions of E-Cigarettes Differ Greatly Between Smokers and Non-Smokers: Penn Schoen Berland Perceptions of E-Cigarettes Differ Greatly Between Smokers and Non-Smokers: Penn Schoen Berland Document Transcript

  • © 2014 PENN SCHOEN AND BERLAND ASSOCIATES LLC. PSBRESEARCH.COM 1 PSB Pulse: Perceptions of E-Cigarettes Differ Greatly Between Smokers and Non-Smokers June 23, 2014 – With the debate heating up about e-cigarettes, PSB fielded a PSB Pulse Poll June 2-3, 2014, among 800 general population US consumers, to gauge familiarity, perceptions, and attitudes regarding e-cigarettes among the general population, smokers, former-smokers, and non-smokers. The key findings are as follows: 1. Familiarity with e-cigarettes remains relatively low, though Smokers and former-smokers are significantly more familiar with e-cigarettes than non-smokers. 2. Despite this relatively low familiarity, the numbers saying they would be bothered by people smoking e- cigarettes around them is at 60%, compared to 85% saying they would be bothered by regular cigarettes. 3. Two-thirds of people consider e-cigarettes to be dangerous, but 58% of smokers consider e-cigarettes not dangerous. 4. 43% think e-cigarettes are as bad as or worse than traditional cigarettes, but among smokers 70% think e- cigarettes are better for people’s health than traditional tobacco cigarettes. 5. Though E-cigarettes are identified as the least effective method of quitting smoking, half still thought e- cigarettes could be effective for quitting.
  • © 2014 PENN SCHOEN AND BERLAND ASSOCIATES LLC. 2 Key Data 1. Familiarity of e-cigarettes remains relatively low, with just a quarter of the population saying they are very familiar with them. That number is 15% among non-smokers, but only 44% among smokers, indicating the potential for growth among smokers remains high. Q: How familiar are you with e-cigarettes? All Non- Smokers Former- Smokers Smokers Total Familiar 70 61 71 85 Very familiar 25 15 25 44 Somewhat familiar 45 46 46 41 Total Not Familiar 30 40 28 16 Not very familiar 18 23 20 10 Not at all familiar 12 17 8 6 Indeed, 60% of current smokers say they have tried e-cigarettes and only 10% say they smoke them regularly. 2. Non-smokers find traditional cigarettes more bothersome than e-cigarettes, but 60% still say they are bothered by people smoking e-cigarettes around them. Q: If someone is smoking around you, other than when you are in an area specifically designated for smoking, how much would it bother you? / If someone were smoking an e-cigarette around you, other than when you are in an area specifically designated for smoking, how much if any would it bother you? Non-Smokers Traditional Cigarettes E-Cigarettes Total Bothered 85 60 A great deal 59 31 Somewhat 26 29 Total Not Bothered 15 40 Not much 8 25 Not at all 7 15 3. Although 65% of all respondents say e-cigarettes are somewhat or very dangerous, 58% of smokers consider e- cigarettes not dangerous (compared to 17% of smokers saying traditional cigarettes are not dangers) – indicating here as well a large potential for smokers to adopt e-cigarettes as a safer alternative.
  • © 2014 PENN SCHOEN AND BERLAND ASSOCIATES LLC. 3 Q: How dangerous do you think cigarettes are for people’s health? / How dangerous do you think e-cigarettes are for people’s health? All Non-Smokers Former-Smokers Smokers Traditional Cigarettes E-Cigarettes Traditional Cigarettes E-Cigarettes Traditional Cigarettes E-Cigarettes Traditional Cigarettes E-Cigarettes Total Dangerous 95 65 97 77 95 67 93 43 Very dangerous 71 24 84 32 72 22 46 11 Somewhat dangerous 24 41 13 45 23 45 47 32 Total Not Dangerous 5 35 4 22 5 34 7 58 Not very dangerous 3 26 2 18 4 24 5 41 Not at all dangerous 2 9 2 4 1 10 2 17 4. 43% overall think c-cigarettes are as bad as or worse than traditional cigarettes, but among smokers 70% think e-cigarettes are better for your health. Q: Do you think e-cigarettes are much better, somewhat better, no different, somewhat worse or much worse for people’s health than traditional tobacco cigarettes? All Non- Smokers Former- Smokers Smokers Total Better 57 49 56 70 Much better 16 8 18 28 Somewhat better 41 41 38 42 No different 38 43 38 27 Total Worse 5 7 6 3 Somewhat worse 2 2 3 2 Much worse 3 5 3 1
  • © 2014 PENN SCHOEN AND BERLAND ASSOCIATES LLC. 4 Whatever their potential appeal as an alternative to traditional cigarettes, when it comes to quitting, e-cigarettes are identified as the least effective method of quitting smoking. Yet half still thought e-cigarettes could be effective in quitting. How effective do you think each of the following is for quitting smoking? Showing All 62% Effective 71% Effective 72% Effective 69% Effective 49% Effective More than half of former smokers agreed e-cigarettes could be effective, but that number was likewise far lower than with other methods How effective do you think each of the following is for quitting smoking? Showing former-smokers only Former-Smokers Total effective Very effective Somewhat effective Total not effective Not very effective Not at all effective Switching to a nicotine replacement therapy, like a patch, gum, or inhaler 75 23 52 26 20 6 The use of a smoking cessation drug 75 18 57 26 17 9 Just doing it on your own (sometimes called "cold turkey") 74 30 44 26 22 4 Working with a professional counselor or coach 72 20 52 28 20 8 Switching to e-cigarettes 53 13 40 47 32 15 9 9 9 10 17 29 19 19 21 33 38 51 53 50 37 24 20 19 19 12 Just doing it on your own (sometimes called "cold turkey") Working with a professional counselor or coach Switching to a nicotine replacement therapy, like a patch, gum, or inhaler The use of a smoking cessation drug Switching to e-cigarettes Very effective Somewhat effective Not very effective Not at all effective
  • © 2014 PENN SCHOEN AND BERLAND ASSOCIATES LLC. 5 About PSB Pulse: Margin of error is ± 3.46 overall and larger for subgroups. PSB Pulse is fielded on the first Monday of each month. It covers business issues ranging from business news to public policy issues affecting business to new product categories and business trends. If you have a question or topic you’d like to explore, please contact us at PSBPulse@ps-b.com to learn more. About Penn Schoen Berland: Penn Schoen Berland (PSB), a member of Young & Rubicam Group and the WPP Group, is a global research-based consultancy that specialises in messaging and communications strategy for blue-chip political, corporate and entertainment clients. PSB’s operations include over 200 consultants and a sophisticated in-house market research infrastructure with the capability to conduct work in over 90 countries. The company operates offices in Washington, D.C., New York, London, Seattle, Los Angeles, Dubai, Dehli, Miami, The Dominican Republic and Denver. More at www.psbresearch.com. For further information, please contact: Jessica Mailloux Penn Schoen Berland Tel: 202-962-3055 Email: jmailloux@ps-b.com www.psbresearch.com