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Project Management Foundations Series Course 104 - Agile Project Management Concepts
 

Project Management Foundations Series Course 104 - Agile Project Management Concepts

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    Project Management Foundations Series Course 104 - Agile Project Management Concepts Project Management Foundations Series Course 104 - Agile Project Management Concepts Presentation Transcript

    • Project Management FoundationsCourse 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts
    • Target Student Audience• Little to no experience with: – Formal Project Management Concepts – PMI Project Management Body of Knowledge – Agile Project Management Concepts – SCRUM Methodology• Frustrated with: – Poorly Organized Work Efforts – Lack of Leadership in Project Efforts – Applying “Waterfall-based” techniques to all projects – Project management approaches that have excessive process and document requirements
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management ConceptsCourse Syllabus: Segment Introduction to Agile Project Management One Concepts Segment A Closer Look at SCRUM Two Segment Applying Agile PM to Your Organization Three QUIZ Demonstrate What You’ve Learned!
    • Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts
    • What is Agile Project Management? • Definition: – “Iterative method of determining requirements for engineering and information technology development projects in a highly flexible and interactive manner”1 • Agile is most effective on projects that are: – Very complex for the end user or project sponsorship to technically understand – Difficult to fully define the full scope or set of requirements at the beginning of the project – Likely to have many changes or updates during the project lifecyclehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agile_management
    • Historical Influences and Chronology of Agile Methodology1950s & 1960s 1990s• Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) Cycles • Crystal Methods• Total Quality Management (TQM) • Lean Software Development • Rational Unified Process (RUP)• Toyota Production System (TPS) • Dynamic Software Development Method (DSDM)1970s & 1980s • Observe-Orient-Decide-Act Loop (OODA)• Lean Manufacturing • Feature Driven Development• Six Sigma • eXtreme Programming (XP)• Theory of Constraints (ToC) • Adaptive Software Development • SCRUM Methodology 2000s: • Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) • The Agile Manifesto • http://www.agilemanifesto.org
    • The Agile Manifesto’s Statement of Values Individuals and Interactions Individuals and Interactions over Process and Tools Process and Tools Working Systems Working Systems over Comprehensive Documentation Comprehensive Documentation Customer Collaboration Customer Collaboration over Contract Negotiation Contract Negotiation Responding to Change Responding to Change over Following a Plan Following a PlanWhile agile practitioners value the items on the left, they value the items on the right even more! Source: www.agilemanifesto.org
    • The Twelve Principles of the Agile Manifesto 1. Customer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful software 2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development 3. Working software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months) 4. Working software is the principal measure of progress 5. Sustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace 6. Close, daily cooperation between business people and developers 7. Face-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location) 8. Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted 9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design 10. Simplicity is essential 11. Self-organizing teams 12. Regular adaptation to changing circumstances
    • Agile Principles in ActionKey Agile Principles: Delivering Customer Value with Delivering Customer Value with• Focus on Customer Value – Align project, Agile Project Management Agile Project Management product and team visions to deliver better product quality – faster and cheaper. The right product, at the right time, for the The right product, at the right time, for the right price. right price.• Small Batches - Create a flow of value to customers by “chunking” feature delivery into •Higher Quality: “Designed-to-fit” •Higher Quality: “Designed-to-fit” small increments. product with flexibility to change. product with flexibility to change.• Small, Integrated Teams - Intense collaboration via face-to-face communication, •Increased Throughput: Iterative and •Increased Throughput: Iterative and collocation, etc; diversified roles on integrated, incremental project and product “chunks” incremental project and product “chunks” self-organizing, self-disciplined teams. with earlier value delivery. with earlier value delivery.• Small, Continuous Improvements – Teams reflect, learn and adapt to change; work informs •Reduced Waste: Lean, efficient processes •Reduced Waste: Lean, efficient processes the plan. with lower costs and higher productivity. with lower costs and higher productivity.
    • How The Agile Lifecycle WorksKey Agile Practices:• Release Planning• Sprint Planning• Daily Scrum/Standup• Fixed-length sprints• Sprint Review• Sprint RetrospectiveIdentify top-priority items and deliver Identify top-priority items and deliverthem rapidly using: them rapidly using: • Small batches • Small batches • Small integrated teams • Small integrated teams • Small, continuous improvements • Small, continuous improvements
    • Agile Software Development Methodology
    • A Closer Look At SCRUM
    • What is SCRUM?• Definition: – “SCRUM is an iterative and incremental development framework for managing technology projects and product development. Its focus is on a flexible, holistic product development strategy where a development team works as a unit to reach a common goal as opposed to a traditional, sequential (waterfall) approach.”
    • How Scrum Works• Projects are made up of self-organizing teams• Requirements are captured as a list of tasks placed on a “product backlog” chart – These task items make up what is known as a “user story”• Product development is conducted along a series of month- long “sprints” made up of a logical amount of tasks that can delivered in that timeframe• No specific design and development practices are prescribed – The self-organizing teams determine the best way to successfully complete the tasks within the sprint
    • What is a Sprint?• Scrum projects make progress in a series of “sprints”• Typical duration of each sprint is 30 days although anywhere between 2-6 weeks is usually acceptable• The product outcome planned for the sprint is completely designed, built and tested during the sprint ©The Code Project Open License (CPOL)• Once a sprint is started, it is allowed to finish without modification
    • Scrum & Change ManagementBefore/After Sprint During Sprint
    • Scrum Roles• Product Owner• ScrumMaster• Scrum Team
    • The Product Owner• Represents the “Voice of the Customer”• States requirements of the product as a “User Story”• Defines the features of the product• Decides on release date and content• Is accountable for ensuring the product has a business need and value• Prioritizes features according to the defined business need/value• Adjusts features and priority every iteration (between sprints)• Accepts or rejects the work results both at the end of each sprint and at the final product review
    • The ScrumMaster• Represents management to the project• Responsible for enacting Scrum values and practices• Removes impediments• Ensure that the team is fully functional and productive• Enable close cooperation across all roles and functions• Shield the team from external interferences
    • The Scrum Team• Typically limited to 5-9 people • “If the team cant be fed by two pizzas, then its too big” – Steve Bezos, CEO of Amazon• Cross-functional skill sets• Members should be dedicated full-time • May be some exceptions for niche players• Teams are self-organizing• Membership should change only between sprints
    • Scrum Activities• Establish the Product Backlog• Create the Sprint Backlog• Sprint Planning• Sprint Execution / Daily SCRUM• Sprint Closing Activities• Product Backlog Refining
    • Establish The Product Backlog • Completed and prioritized by the Product Owner • A list of all desired work on the project • A list of the “must have’s” vs. the “nice to haves’” • Usually captured as a “user story” that describes the need, value and use of the item • Reprioritized at the start of each sprint
    • A Sample Product Backlog User Story Initial EstimateAs a salesperson, I would like to allow a prospect to email me 6directly with questionsAs a customer, I want to be able to order direct from the web 5As a customer, I want to be able to cancel or change my order from 3the webAs a warehouse manager, I want to be able to get an automated 8“pick list” of the customer’s order emailed to my teamEliminate paper handling between sales and the warehouse 8Integrate with financial management systems 30Integrate with inventory management systems 50
    • Establishing the Sprint Backlog • The Scrum Team selects items from the product backlog they can commit to completing within the planned sprint duration • Sprint backlog is created based on the user stories selected • Tasks are identified and each is estimated for time required – 1 hour minimum to 40 hours maximum • The ScrumMaster facilitates the discussion but the SCRUM Team is responsible for completion • High-level design framework is considered toAs a salesperson, I would like ensure the end productto allow a prospect to emailme directly with questions • Design mailto: form and interface (2) • Position interface on ‘Contact Us’ Page (1) • Configure mail routing protocols (2) • Map mail routing and store in sprint design log (1)
    • Managing The Sprint Backlog• Individuals sign up for work tasks of their own choosing  Work is never assigned• Estimated work remaining is updated daily• Any work that can’t be readily defined should be saved for the end of the sprint and updated as more becomes known• Once the Sprint Backlog is defined, it is LOCKED and no changes can be made by those outside of the Scrum Team until the sprint is over  Any team member can add, delete or change the sprint backlog
    • A Sample Sprint Backlog Tasks Tasks Mon Tues Wed Thur Mon Tues Wed Thur Fri Fri Design mailto: form and interface 2 1Position interface on ‘Contact Us’Page 1 1 1Configure mail routing protocols 2 1Map mail routing and store in sprintdesign log 1 1 1 1TOTAL EFFORT REMAINING  6 4 2 1 0
    • Sprint Execution The Daily Scrum: •Stand-up Meeting •No longer than 20 minutes •Anyone is welcome, but only Team Members, ScrumMaster, and Product Owner can talk •Daily Scrum is NOT a problem solving meeting •Three questions are asked of each Team Member: 1. What did you do yesterday? • Not a status report but a list of tasks The ScrumMaster will provide completed and started general status updates, discuss issue 1. What are you working on today?resolution plans and conduct Q&A in • A commitment to the Team about what you plan to accomplish a separate meeting following the 1. What is getting in your way? Daily Scrum
    • SCRUM Board Not Started In Progress Verify / Test Done Map Mail Routing Position Interface Check and Store In Sprint on ‘Contact Us’ Design mailto: Infrastructure Page Form and Interface Design Log Validated on 03/31 Meet with Product Owner regardingConfigure Mail question on different Test MailRouting email addresses RoutingProtocols
    • “Real-World” SCRUM Board ExampleThanks to our friends at the Visual Management Blog! http://www.xqa.com.ar/visualmanagement/
    • Sprint Tracking & Burndown ChartingSprint 1 Backlog Daily Progress 5 4.5 4 Ideal Progress 3.5 Current Trend 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 Sort Sprint Tasks Update Task Slips W m R 0.5 h g n a e o k ) ( r i 0Sprint implementation days 5 Effort Remaining on implementation daTrend calculated based on last 5 Days Totals 4 4 4 2 1Task name Story ID Responsible Status Est. 1 2 3 4 5Design mailto: form and interface 1 1 1Position interface on ‘Contact Us’ Page 1 1 1 1Configure mail routing protocols 1 1 1Map mail routing and store in sprint design log 1 1 1 1 1
    • The Sprint Review• The Scrum Team presents the following: • What was accomplished during the sprint • What was not accomplished during the sprint • Any issues encountered during the sprint • Any changes needed during the sprint• The Scrum Team will demo or showcase the product, feature or other deliverable that was completed at the end of the sprint• The Sprint Review is an informal meeting with the following rules: • No more than two (2) hours to prepare • No slides…No handouts • Whole team participates
    • The Sprint Retrospective• Conducted after every sprint• Entire project stakeholder group should participate: • ScrumMaster • Product Owner • Scrum Team • Customers, End Users, Senior Leaders and Others• Discuss how the last sprint went • What is (and is not) working • Issues encountered • Changes needed
    • Product Backlog Refining• Assess remaining Product Backlog• Add / Delete / Modify Product Backlog• Re-Prioritize Product Backlog• Start Next Sprint Planning
    • Applying Agile ProjectManagement To Your Organization
    • Making The Transition To AgileTraditional Project Management Agile Project ManagementFocus on plans and document artifacts Focus on customer satisfaction and interactionChange controlled via formal request process Change is expected, planned and adapted as neededResource-intensive up-front planning Progressive, iterative, rolling-wave planningSponsor dictated, scope-based delivery Product Owner prioritized, time-boxed deliveryActivity management via work breakdown Task planning and execution flow based on Teamstructure Member commitmentTop-down control Collaboration of self-disciplined and self- organizing teamsRigid, formal management methods Minimal set of loose guidelines and best practices
    • Tailoring Agile To Fit Your Organization Adopt key features of the process • Release and Iteration Planning • Product and Iteration Backlogs • Tracking via Burndown charts • Team co-located in team rooms • Core team dedicated to project Define allowable actions • Estimation done only by performers • Prioritization done only by product owners Prioritize work opportunities • Priorities always decided in Sprint Planning Meetings Establish and synchronize delivery pace • 4-Week Sprints as a default Minimize sunk project costs • Sprint Resets or Stops allowable only in extreme circumstances
    • Agile Project Management Best Practices 1. Daily SCRUM Stand-Up Meetings o Follow the three (3) question format o Enforce who is (and is not) allowed to speak at the meeting 1. Team Co-Location o Common areas to collaborate and meet o Private spaces for thinking and focused work 1. Planning Poker o Fun, card-game based activity to develop work task effort/time estimates 1. Resource Pairing o Team-based work assignments rather than solo efforts/tasks 1. Use a “Scrum Board” 1. Great visual management tool! • Small Release Cycles o Keep sprints under six (6) weeks in length o Thirty (30) days is preferred
    • Review What You’ve Learned
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 1: • The ______________ is developed and prioritized by the Product Owner.
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 1: Answer: • The ______________ is Product Backlog developed and prioritized by the Product Owner.
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 2: The Agile Manifesto states that agile values individuals and interactions over ________ and ________.
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 2: Answer: The Agile Manifesto states Process and Tools that agile values individuals and interactions over ________ and ________.
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 3: True or False. The definition of Agile Project Management is the Iterative method of determining requirements for engineering and information technology development projects in a highly flexible and interactive manner.
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 3: Answer: True or False. True. The definition of Agile Project Management is the Iterative method of determining requirements for engineering and information technology development projects in a highly flexible and interactive manner.
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 4: • What are the three questions asked during every Daily Scrum Stand-Up Meeting?
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 4: Answer: • What are the three 1. What did you accomplish yesterday? questions asked during 2. What are you working on today? every Daily Scrum 3. What is getting in your way? Stand-Up Meeting?
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 5: • One of the most important methods for communicating the progress of the sprint is the _______________.
    • Course 104 – Introduction to Agile Project Management Concepts - QUIZ - Question 5: Answer: • One of the most Sprint Burn-Down Chart important methods for communicating the progress of the sprint is the _______________.
    • CONGRATULATIONS!You have successfully completed:Project Management FoundationsCourse 103 – Project Stakeholder Management PRESENTED BY: Think For A Change, LLC.
    • For more information on best/next practices,educational training, tools, techniques andprocess models for: • Project Management • Innovation Management • Product Management • Leadership Please visit: http://www.thinkforachange.com