Professional standards: the evidence
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Professional standards: the evidence

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This presentation for school library professionals provides an update on what Australian school library professional associations are doing in preparing for the introduction of national......

This presentation for school library professionals provides an update on what Australian school library professional associations are doing in preparing for the introduction of national professional teaching standards and identifying ways in which teacher librarians need to think differently, act differently and learn differently.

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  • This presentation for school library professionals provides an update on what Australian school library professional associations are doing in preparing for the introduction of national professional teaching standards and identifying ways in which teacher librarians need to think differently, act differently and learn differently.
  • If I was to ask you tomorrow to produce the evidence that showed you meet professional teaching standards, and were a fit person to hold a teacher librarian in an Australian school, how would you answer me? It’s in my head, give me a day & I’ll write it out for you It’s in my filing cabinet, I’ll sort it into a folder for you It’s on my computer, in an email folder It’s on a USB, I’ll export it for you It’s in the ALIA CPD database – I’ll print it out It’s on our school PD database, I’ll get the Deputy to run a report It’s online, here’s the url – or the list of urls It’s in the Institute of Teachers or Department’s database, I’ll never be able to give it to you It’s in my last job application or CV – I’ll just update it and send it to you So where is your evidence? Share how are you recording professional learning? What are you keeping, what should you be keeping? Take control of it!
  • Working party with goal: to help teacher librarians with context and evidence for standards – meeting monthly since June 2011 AITSL strong on not wanting separate standards – these have to work for all contexts Professional Knowledge mapping document Professional Practice mapping document Professional Engagement mapping document
  • Standards are not new to our profession. Mandated standards may be new to many. Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) & Australian School Library Association (ASLA). (2004). Standards of professional excellence for teacher librarians, http://www.asla.org.au/policy/standards.htm These 2004 standards from the Australian School Library Association (ASLA) and the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) “represent the goals to which all teacher librarians should aspire, and provide inspiration for quality teaching and ongoing professional practice” (Mitchell, 2005, p.1) as a basis for quality school library service [www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slwjan06-mitchell.pdf] The ALIA Board determined “if teacher librarians were to demonstrate successfully to the education profession the importance of their dual role within the school community, that this would best be done by using a methodology and language which would be credibly-received by their teaching colleagues. For this reason, the Board endorsed the development of 'standards' rather than 'guidelines' for teacher librarians.”
  • From the AITSL infographic (2011): http://www.aitsl.edu.au/verve/_resources/AITSL_infographic_web.pdf Why professional standards? To meet legislative requirements To get/keep job To improve / learn constantly to grow your professionalism and the profession Provide example of what a teacher librarian is, knows and does A feedback tool, both professional and personal Most importantly: to improve student learning! This is a site to investigate in depth. Professional associations have pushed to be involved as much as possible in this process, and are involved in projects that become available for supporting materials.
  • The ASLA-ALIA standards were clearly written as aspirational - for exemplary teacher librarians, the equivalent to the AITSL Highly accomplished career stage: http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalKnowledge/Standards Graduate teacher entry level standards have been part of teacher education – and teacher registration bodies, eg Victorian Institute of Teachers has emphasised beginning teachers standards. Work is also happening at the lead level, with an online community at Palnet: www.palnet.edu.au
  • According to Lawrence Ingvarson & Anne Semple, ASTA 2006 http://www.acer.edu.au/documents/RC2006_IngvarsonSlides.pdf And Semple 2011: http://moodle.asta.edu.au/calendar/view.php?view=day&course=1&cal_d=27&cal_m=09&cal_y=2011#event_6 To be useful, to be valid, to be worth measuring, standards need to be “inspirational, aspirational and achievable” plus “valid and measurable” According to AITSL Certification of Highly Accomplished and Lead Teachers Promoting excellence in the profession of teaching and school leadership: Principles and major features October 2011 http://www.aitsl.edu.au/verve/_resources/Certification_HA_and_L_-_Principles__major_features_paper_-_MCEECDYA_endorsed_-_October_2011.pdf The proposed approach to the certification of Highly Accomplished and Lead teachers is informed by five principles: 1. Standards-based: Certification is against the National Professional Standards for Teachers. It represents an assessment against the Standards, independent of any use it might then be put to by teachers, their employers, or others. 2. Student-improvement focused: Certification recognises those teachers who are highly effective in promoting student learning, engagement and wellbeing. Evidence of student outcomes is central to the certification process. 3. Development driven: Certification is part of a wider teacher development approach that includes professional learning, and performance management and development. Participation in the certification process should be a positive experience for participants and provide useful feedback that leads to improvement and learning, including for those teachers who do not achieve Certification. 4. Credible: Certification is credible when assessments of teacher performance are based on rigorous, valid, reliable, fair and transparent measures and processes. 5. Evidence-based: Certification must be built on evidence-based practice and contribute to the development of evidence about what works in promoting and recognising teacher quality.
  • The teacher professional standards will initially mean different things to different states – systems – sectors – schools – levels of schooling Timeline: Teacher registration renewal. Employment/promotion. Be proactive For experienced teachers, the probably first priority will be standards-referenced professional development activities. Victorian Institute of Teachers Renewal of Registration instructions: The requirements for teachers renewing their registration during the phased implementation period (31 december 2007 - 31 december 2012) http://www.vit.vic.edu.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/PDF/1338_summary-of-requirements-2.pdf “ Teachers are required to undertake at least 100 hours of professional development activities in the five years leading up to their due date for renewal of registration. All activities must have a reference to the standards of professional practice. At least half the activities must provide access to research and knowledge sourced from outside the immediate school or work environment. The balance of activities can come from either more activities providing access to research and knowledge sourced from outside the immediate school environment or activities teachers identify as contributing to their professional practice, knowledge or well-being.”
  • It is relatively easy to map VIT standards to AITSL http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalKnowledge http://vit.vic.edu.au/prt/assets/media/files/standards.pdf
  • Some crucial words differ here, but it is still clear how to map and address the new standards at this top level. You could all write some evidence for one of these points. http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalPractice http://vit.vic.edu.au/prt/assets/media/files/standards.pdf
  • I don’t think anything says it better than VIT #6: Reflect on, evaluate and improve their professional practice – it is the whole point of this exercise. How would you provide evidence of that? http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalEngagement http://vit.vic.edu.au/prt/assets/media/files/standards.pdf
  • Using example from our profession – a responsibility equivalent to that of many other professions Employers and the Australian Library and Information Association have a responsibility to provide opportunities which enable library and information professionals to maintain excellent service delivery. http://alia.org.au/policies/professional.development.html
  • For those registered for the ALIA CPD scheme there is a broad range of suggested professional learning activities with associated points http://membership.alia.org.au/scripts/cgiip.exe/WService=ALIA/ccms.r?pageid=10034 This is an example of the ‘Learn by hours spent or Collect PD points’ form of professional accreditation and standards ALIA CPD activity ideas a minimum of 30 points annually from 1 July to 30 June a minimum of 120 points each triennium (3 years) Certified Practitioner Status and using the (CP) post nominal This method of defining, measuring or quantifying professionalism may be simple for employer and professional requirements but evidence of attending PD is not necessarily evidence of a change in practice.
  • M Hough 2010 attributed to Joyce 1996/7 This is a broader definition of professional learning, recognising a range of effective forms of professional learning: Within the school with an external presenter or a colleague presenting new knowledge Within the school in collaboration with other colleagues External to the school Undertaken on the initiative of the teacher, either in or out of school Other (Provide details)
  • So how is teacher librarian practice different now? Todd, R 2005 School Libraries, Productive Pedagogy and the Leading of Learning www.slav.schools.net.au/downloads/08pastpapers/15learners/RToddAug2005.ppt
  • The teacher librarians standards working party (PAPT) spent time trying to map the ASLA-ALIA standards to AITSL and ended up with several messy google docs. There was not always a straightforward map with the key issue being where to place the technical services component of the teacher librarian’s role. Finally it was decided to start with AITSL statements and draft short sentences that provided context for these standards from the work of a teacher librarian. http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalPractice http://asla.org.au/policy/standards.htm
  • http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalPractice
  • An example of how a teacher librarian might look to develop evidence in this particular standard area
  • The assessment standards may require particular attention by teacher librarians. http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalPractice
  • This is one area of key practice for teacher librarians. http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalPractice
  • Teacher librarians should experience no difficulty demonstrating practice in the area of ICT
  • Collecting and presenting evidence is possibly the major challenge, especially in the current environment where requirements, purposes, mandate and timeline have not yet been determined for most of us. Now is a good time however to get started with time to practise, and consider presentation options etc The working party has gone beyond its brief and brainstormed possible indicators and evidence points in the hope that these are helpful for teacher librarians contextualising standards. These are some of the indicators brainstormed for a particular standard.
  • It is important to remember that we are NOT trying to define new teacher librarian standards but providing context to the AITSL standards for use by teacher librarians and their managers. Just a warning based on the experience of the working party to ensure the teacher librarian lens is not radically changing the intent of a particular standard. For instance, in this draft context statement from the working party we see a possible mismatch as we initially look at standards, eg AITSL is talking about communication strategies, TLs are thinking resources Is this an issue? Discuss. http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/DomainOfTeaching/ProfessionalPractice
  • Fact or fiction: http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/Illustrations/ViewIOP/IOP00092/index.html Engaging readers: http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/Illustrations/ViewIOP/IOP00069/index.html Primary Teacher of the Year 2011 – Jo Sherrin Case study: Ann Gillespie http://www.ifla.org/node/5752 The importance of evidence-based practice in libraries How library associations support their members The resources developed and distributed by associations The role played by standards and benchmarking in service quality The role of members to contribute to the association’s work
  • There is no point with national standards in everyone starting from scratch and developing their own professional learning, mapping and resources. School Library Association of Victoria suggest using the School Libraries Achieving Results ning [http://schoollibrariesachievingresults.ning.com] and social media to share developments and ideas. Social bookmarking Blogging Workshops Please provide feedback to the working party when the drafts are released.

Transcript

  • 1. Professional standards the evidence Pru Mitchell pru.mitchell@esa.edu.au
  • 2. Where is your evidence?• in my head, give me a day & I’ll write it out for you• in my filing cabinet, I’ll sort it into a folder for you• on my computer, in an email folder• on USB, I’ll export it for you• in the ALIA CPD database – I’ll print it out• in school PD database, I’ll get the Deputy to run a report• online, here’s the url – or the list of urls• in my last job application or CV – I’ll just update it and send it to you
  • 3. Policy working partyToni Leigh, Qld & ASLA BoardCamilla Elliott, VicAnne Girolami, VicMargaret Simkin, VicAnne Whisken, VicPru Mitchell, SAMargo Pickworth, NSWAnne Plowman, ACT
  • 4. Think differently the goals to which all teacher librarians should aspire, and inspiration for quality teaching and ongoing professional practice Standards of professional excellence for teacher librarians
  • 5. Think evidence-based teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au
  • 6. Think developmental
  • 7. Think standards that are... inspirational aspirational achievable also valid and measurable Ingvarson & Semple
  • 8. What’s it mean for you? Image: Questionmark made of puzzle pieces Horia Varlan, CC-by
  • 9. Mapping VIT to AITSLProfessional knowledge• Know students and how they learn [AITSL] Know how students learn and how to teach effectively [VIT]• Know the content and how to teach it [AITSL] Know the content they teach [VIT] [3. Know their students] [VIT] vit.vic.edu.au/standardsandlearning
  • 10. Professional practice• Plan for and [implement] assess for effective [teaching and] learning [AITSL]• Create and maintain [supportive and] safe and challenging learning environments [AITSL]• Assess, provide feedback and report on student learning [AITSL] Use a range of teaching practices and resources to engage students in effective learning [VIT]
  • 11. Professional engagement• Engage in professional learning [AITSL] Reflect on, evaluate and improve their professional practice [VIT]• Engage professionally with colleagues, parents/carers and the community [AITSL] Are active members of their profession [VIT]
  • 12. Professional learning Library and information professionals have a responsibility to commit to professional development and career-long learning ALIA principle, 2005 alia.org.au/education/pd
  • 13. Learn for points
  • 14. Learn differently Type of Prof Learning Focus Job-embedded Classroom Job-related School Employment-related System Career-related Profession Self-directed Personal M Hough 2010 attributed to Joyce 1996/7
  • 15. Act differentlyThe instructional partnership is not aboutteacher doing content and teacher-librariandoing information literacy, but aboutmutually solving learning dilemmas with theshared expertises: information learning anddisciplinary learning Ross Todd 2005 SLAV conference
  • 16. Mapping ASLA-ALIA to AITSL3.5 Use effective classroom communication [AITSL]2.1 3 Foster an environment where learners are encouraged and empowered to read, view, listen and respond for understanding and enjoyment [ASLA-ALIA]
  • 17. Teacher librarian context3.2 Plan, structure and sequence learning programs [AITSL]Highly accomplished teacher librarians actively plan, teach and evaluate with teachers to explicitly teach information skills. They also provide an environment that supports engaged learning by utilising their knowledge of cross curricula and cross school views. [working party draft 1]
  • 18. Content2. Know the content and how to teach it [AITSL]Highly accomplished teacher librarians support their peers by using their comprehensive knowledge of current content requirements and teaching strategies to collaboratively plan and teach a wide range of topics for both classroom and subject teachers. [working party draft 1]
  • 19. Assessment5. Assess, provide feedback and report on student learning [AITSL]Highly accomplished teacher librarians work with classroom and subject teachers to collect rich, personalised and accurate evidence of student achievement and report this in a form that facilitates effective communication with students and parents. [working party draft 1]
  • 20. Resources3.4 Select and use resources [AITSL]Highly accomplished teacher librarians work with staff to develop, recommend, organise and manage appropriate print and online resources to support student learning, and policies relating to the selection, implementation and evaluation of appropriate resources. [working party draft 1]
  • 21. ICT2.6 Information and Communication Technology [AITSL]Highly accomplished teacher librarians model and encourage colleagues to use new and emerging technologies, digital resources and tools in the classroom. They work collaboratively with colleagues to use digital resources and tools to improve student learning and engagement. [working party draft 1]
  • 22. What is your evidence? • learning/skills continuum matrix document • collaborative programming, planning documents across different aspects of role • minutes of planning meetings • implementation video • feedback from students and teachers about teaching • using Researching Together (SLAV 2005)
  • 23. Teacher librarian mindsetAssist colleagues to select a wide range of verbaland non-verbal communication strategies tosupport students’ understanding, engagement andachievement. [AITSL]Teacher-librarians provide, demonstrate andencourage use of a wide range of resources,including print, electronic, online, audio, softwareand recordings. [working party draft 1]
  • 24. What resources are there? • AITSL Illustrations of practice www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/Illustrations • IFLA case study www.ifla.org/node/5752 • ePortfolios electronicportfolios.com
  • 25. Sharing differently #vicpln asla.org.au twitter.com/ASLA_National
  • 26. References Hough, M 2010, Libraries supporting staff development, SLAQ/IASL conference www.slideshare.net/IASLonline/libraries-support-staff-development Ingvarson, L & Semple, A 2006 How can professional standards improve the quality of teaching and learning science? www.acer.edu.au/documents/RC2006_IngvarsonSlides.pdf Mitchell, P 2006, Australia’s Professional Excellence Policy, School Libraries Worldwide 12 (1): 39-49 www.iasl-online.org/pubs/slw/slwjan06-mitchell.pdf Todd, R 2005, School Libraries, Productive Pedagogy and the Leading of Learning, SLAV conference www.slav.schools.net.au/downloads/08pastpapers/15learners/RToddAug2005.ppt