Infographic: Measuring PR Pros’ Engagement with Wikipedia

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Over a thousand public relations professionals from PRSA, the International Association of Business Communicators, the Word of Mouth Marketing Association, the Institute for Public Relations and the …

Over a thousand public relations professionals from PRSA, the International Association of Business Communicators, the Word of Mouth Marketing Association, the Institute for Public Relations and the National Investor Relations Institute were surveyed to assess their working relationship with Wikipedia.

Results of the survey indicate a gap exists between public relations professionals and Wikipedia concerning the proper protocol for editing entries.

When respondents attempted to engage editors through Wikipedia’s “Talk” pages to request factual corrections to entries, 40 percent said it took “days” to receive a response, 12 percent indicated “weeks,” while 24 percent never received any type of response. According to Wikipedia, the standard response time to requests for corrections is between two and five days.

Only 35 percent of respondents were able to engage with Wikipedia, either by using its “Talk” pages to converse with editors or through direct editing of a client’s entry. Respondents indicated this figure is low partly because some fear media backlash over making edits to clients’ entries. Respondents also expressed a certain level of uncertainty regarding how to properly edit Wikipedia entries.

Of those who were familiar with the process of editing Wikipedia entries, 23 percent said making changes was “near impossible.” Twenty-nine percent said their interactions with Wikipedia editors were “never productive.”

Results of the survey also indicate that public relations professionals have only a rudimentary understanding of Wikipedia’s rules for editing and the protocol for contacting editors to secure factual changes.

Measuring Public Relations Wikipedia Engagement: How Bright is the Rule?
http://www.prsa.org/wikipedia

Exploring the Problems with Wikipedia’s Editing Rule for Public Relations:
http://www.instituteforpr.org/topics/exploring-the-problems-with-wikipedia%E2%80%99s-editing-rule-for-public-relations/

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  • 1. Marcia W. DiStaso, Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University Survey with 1,284 responses conducted with PRSA, IABC, IPR, WOMMA, and NIRI members 2/14-3/14 2012 of Wikipedia articles forcompanies and clients of respondents who were familiar with them had factual errors of respondents who used talk pages thought the rule should change of respondents haveengaged with Wikipedia When requesting changes you should expect to wait 2-5 According to Jimmy days for a response Wales, "There is a very simple “bright line” rule that constitutes best practice: do not editsaid making changes was Wikipedia directly if you are a paid advocate." near impossible Wikipedia rules, policies and guidelines need to be clarified to consistently reflect what PR/communications professionals should and should not do. Regular reviews of Wikipedia articles for accuracy and balance need to be conducted. If errors are found or if you believe content needs to be added or changed, refer to the CREWE Wikipedia Engagement Flowchart available on Wikimedia Commons. For full results and to learn more go to: Measuring Public Relations Wikipedia Engagement: How Bright is the Rule? Vol. 6, No. 2 Public Relations Journal Exploring the Problems with Wikipedia’s Editing Rule for Public Relations Institute for Public Relations Infographic created by: Alexa Agugliaro & Samantha Temkin