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  • Is the guy going to catch this ball? Why or why not?
  • Ground rules to be set by group
  • Consider if people beyond management can be leaders? How do they do this? What is there motivation? How can we identify them?
  • To the company? To the employees? To your supervisor? To your peers? To yourself?
  • We may all have characteristics of each of these. Upper right is a doormat
  • Employees are watching what we do every day. They are seeking information to confirm their beliefs about management as a whole. This may be positive or negative. You can make this work for you – how?
  • Some psychology-ese about the nature of how people think and function within all aspects of their lives.
  • Maslow's primary contribution to psychology is his Hierarchy of Needs . Maslow contended that humans have a number of needs that are innate. These needs are classified as "conative needs," "cognitive needs," and "aesthetic needs." "Neurotic needs" are included in Maslow's theory but do not exist within the hierarchy. Maslow postulated that needs are arranged in a hierarchy in terms of their potency. Although all needs are instinctive, some are more powerful than others. The lower the need is in the pyramid, the more powerful it is. The higher the need is in the pyramid, the weaker and more distinctly human it is. The lower, or basic, needs on the pyramid are similar to those possessed by non-human animals, but only humans possess the higher needs. The first four layers of the pyramid are what Maslow called "deficiency needs" or "D-needs:" the individual does not feel anything if they are met, but feels anxious if they are not met..... Needs beyond the D-needs are "growth needs," "being values," or "B-needs." When fulfilled, they do not go away; rather, they motivate further. The base of the pyramid is formed by the physiological needs, including the biological requirements for food, water, air, and sleep. Once the physiological needs are met, an individual can concentrate on the second level, the need for safety and security. Included here are the needs for structure, order, security, and predictability. The third level is the need for love and belonging. Included here are the needs for friends and companions, a supportive family, identification with a group, and an intimate relationship. The fourth level is the esteem needs. This group of needs requires both recognition from other people that results in feelings of prestige, acceptance, and status, and self-esteem that results in feelings of adequacy, competence, and confidence. Lack of satisfaction of the esteem needs results in discouragement and feelings of inferiority. Finally, self-actualization sits at the apex of the original pyramid. In 1970 Maslow published a revision to his original 1954 pyramid [1] , adding the cognitive needs (first the need to acquire knowledge, then the need to understand that knowledge) above the need for self-actualization, and the aesthetic needs (the needs to create and/or experience beauty, balance, structure, etc.) at the top of the pyramid. However, not all versions of Maslow's pyramid include the top two levels. Maslow theorized that unfulfilled cognitive needs can become redirected into neurotic needs. For example, children whose safety needs are not adequately met may grow into adults who compulsively hoard money or possessions [2] . Unlike other needs, however, neurotic needs do not promote health or growth if they are satisfied. Maslow also proposed that people who have reached self-actualization will sometimes experience a state he referred to as " transcendence ," in which they become aware of not only their own fullest potential, but the fullest potential of human beings at large. He described this transcendence and its characteristics in an essay in the posthumously published The Farther Reaches of Human Nature . (see flow ).
  • Many HR professionals believe that the following are the base of the work related hierarchy pyramid: Pay Benefits Work Environment (lighting, cleanliness, rest rooms, etc.) Work Tools
  • Partnership in being a steward of the business. Consideration not only for the strength of the business, but the leadership of the business. A weak leader affects the entire team, not just their own team. Walk the walk, talk the talk. Consistency in management.
  • Historical Leaders: Abraham Lincoln, FDR, TR, Gandhi, Regan, Carter, etc. Professional Leaders: Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Steve Jobs.
  • “You make the choice.” “True leaders take their exercise of leadership personally and they do it passionately. That passion is given to the organization as a whole. Their sole concern is not the balance sheet or the stock market quote. A true leader, in today’s extremely competitive environment, is concerned with the use of the best business practices and setting an example for their industry. They insist on establishing and maintaining a work ethic second to none;” “Customer service is not just a phrase painted over the door; it’s their standard. Corporate Service is their mindset, coupled to bi-directional loyalty between the organization and the employees. Leaders place their own interest last on their list of priorities. They concentrate their efforts on their people, providing the right tools for their job coupled with growth opportunities and empowerment. Leaders are good miners, mining for ideas from all levels of the organization. The success of the organization, their boss, and their subordinates, especially their subordinates, are top priorities.” Jose Alicia, The Leadership Void p. 24-25
  • READ FROM 21 LAWS: P. 14- “ Great leaders move us. They ignite our passion and inspire the best in us. When we try to explain why they are so effective, we speak of strategy, vision, or powerful ideas. But the reality is much more primal: Great leadership works through the emotions.” “ Quite simply, in any human group the leader has maximal power to sway everyone’s emotions. If people’s emotions are pushed toward the range of enthusiasm, performance can soar; if people are driven toward rancor and anxiety, they will be thrown off stride.” Primal Leadership, Goldman, Boyatzis, McKee p. 3-5 “ The Law of Influence – The true measure of leadership is influence – nothing more, nothing less. If you don’t have influence you will never be able to lead others.” The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership – p. 11 Influence cannot be mandated but comes from building relationships, trust, character. “ The difference between leading and managing . . . Is that leadership is about influencing people to follow, while management focuses on maintaining systems and processes.” Leadership is about creating positive change.
  • Employees need to trust their leaders. “You don’t build trust by talking about it. You build it by achieving results with integrity and regard for the people with whom you work.” 21 Laws p. 60 Employees know when you make mistakes – do you fess up? If yes, you will gain trust. “People will tolerate honest mistakes, but if you violate their trust it is difficult to regain confidence.” Why is trust important? Example: Tom Gearhart: Tore up employee warning in front of employee following successful discussion. Why? What did this say to the employee?
  • In the cast of Enron, employees were encouraged to purchase company stock through their pension and 401K plans. Employees were allowed to put 100% of their retirement funds into company stocks. When the company fell, there were many employees who lost their entire retirement savings. After Enron, the distrust of company sponsored plans soared. Employees became wary of these plans and began seeking other avenues for their retirement savings. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 ( Pub.L . 107-204 , 116  Stat.  745, enacted 2002 - 07-30 ), also known as the Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act of 2002 and commonly called SOx or Sarbox ; is a United States federal law enacted on July 30, 2002 in response to a number of major corporate and accounting scandals including those affecting Enron , Tyco International , Adelphia , Peregrine Systems and WorldCom . These scandals, which cost investors billions of dollars when the share prices of the affected companies collapsed, shook public confidence in the nation's securities markets. Named after sponsors Senator Paul Sarbanes ( D - MD ) and Representative Michael G. Oxley ( R - OH ), the Act was approved by the House by a vote of 423-3 and by the Senate 99-0 . President George W. Bush signed it into law, stating it included "the most far-reaching reforms of American business practices since the time of Franklin D. Roosevelt."[1] The legislation establishes new or enhanced standards for all U.S. public company boards, management, and public accounting firms. It does not apply to privately held companies. The Act contains 11 titles, or sections, ranging from additional Corporate Board responsibilities to criminal penalties, and requires the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to implement rulings on requirements to comply with the new law. Debate continues over the perceived benefits and costs of SOX. Supporters contend that the legislation was necessary and has played a useful role in restoring public confidence in the nation's capital markets by, among other things, strengthening corporate accounting controls. The Act establishes a new quasi-public agency, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB, which is charged with overseeing, regulating, inspecting, and disciplining accounting firms in their roles as auditors of public companies. The Act also covers issues such as auditor independence, corporate governance, internal control assessment, and enhanced financial disclosure.
  • What relates to our F1 strategy?
  • View first 20 minutes. Talk about “right now” versus theory.
  • When you are put in charge, take charge. Don’t lead from the sidelines, choose to influence people. Remember, nothing will change unless you make it change.
  • This was discussed in the video. You know what your hard decision is – make it now. Example: Tom Gearhart: Tore up employee warning in front of employee following successful discussion. Why? What did this say to the employee?
  • Tom Gearhart: Tore up employee warning in front of employee following successful discussion. Why? What did this say to the employee?
  • Tom Gearhart: Tore up employee warning in front of employee following successful discussion. Why? What did this say to the employee?
  • Tom Gearhart: Tore up employee warning in front of employee following successful discussion. Why? What did this say to the employee?
  • Tom Gearhart: Tore up employee warning in front of employee following successful discussion. Why? What did this say to the employee?

Transcript

  • 1. The Importance of Leadership“Youve got to be very careful if youdont know where youre going,because you might not get there.” Yogi Berra
  • 2. ExpectationsWhat do you hope to get out of our session?
  • 3. Ground RulesNo heckling the facilitator
  • 4. Defining Your Role as a Leader Who are the leaders at Acme?
  • 5. Defining Your Role as a Leader What is your responsibility as a leader?
  • 6. What’s your Leadership style?
  • 7. Defining Your Role as a Leader What do employees expect of you?
  • 8. Motivation and LeadershipMaslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  • 9. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Maslow argued that people are motivated by different levels of needs and that lower level needs (food, shelter, clothing) must be met before higher level needs (acceptance, respect, challenge). How does this translate to the workplace?
  • 10. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs A Rutgers University study identified what employees really want from their jobs. They are: Respect Personal Growth Self expression in work and life Allowance for individual preferences and needs (diversity) Positive work environment that values the individual Information about company decisions and policies
  • 11. Defining Your Role as a Leader What does the executive team expect of you?
  • 12. What makes a great leader?Think of a historical leader you admire – whydo you admire that individual. What qualitiesdid they possess to achieve what theyachieved?Think of a leader you have worked withduring your career –why did you admire thatindividual? What qualities did they possessthat you have or would like to emulate?
  • 13. What makes a great leader? Provide Vision Provide Inspiration Make others feel important and appreciated Live their values – behave ethically
  • 14. Primary Rules of LeadershipMake the choice to Lead“ . . . the number one reason people don’t practiceleadership is that is requires 24/7 commitment. Youcan’t be a part-time leader! You’re either 100%committed or not at all. You make the choice.”-Joseph Alicia, The Leadership VoidDo you agree? Why or why not?
  • 15. Primary Rules of LeadershipInfluence and Empowerment "Leadership is the capacity and will to rally men and women to a common purpose and the characterwhich inspires confidence." — Bernard Montgomery, British Field Marshall
  • 16. Primary Rules of LeadershipInfluence and EmpowermentHow do you influence direct reports?Do you influence your peers differently?What’s the difference between leading and managing?
  • 17. Primary Rules of LeadershipCharacter Counts "The respect that leadership must have requires thatones ethics be without question. A leader not only stays abovethe line between right and wrong, he stays well clear of thegray areas." — G. Alan Bernard, President, Mid Park, Inc.
  • 18. Primary Rules of LeadershipHow do poor character and ethics affect a company’semployees? Worst case – Enron Jobs lost, pensions lost, 401K’s lost, stock options lostHow did this affect employee trust in corporateleadership?
  • 19. Primary Rules of LeadershipWorst case – Enron Jobs lost, pensions lost, 401K’s lost, stock options lostOnce trust is lost, it is difficult to regain.
  • 20. Primary Rules of LeadershipHire Well"While you, the leader, can teach many things, character is nottaught easily to adults who arrive at your desk lacking it. Becautious about taking on reclamation projects regardless of thetalent they may possess. Have the courage to make charactercount among the qualities you seek in others." — John Wooden
  • 21. Primary Rules of LeadershipHire Well: Thinking beyond skill and experienceWhy is character important in employees as well asleaders?What specific characteristics should we be screeningfor?
  • 22. VIDEO:Chris WidenerRight Now Leadership
  • 23. Improving Leadership Today CHOOSE TO LEAD
  • 24. Improving Leadership Today CHOOSE TO LEAD Make the tough decisions
  • 25. Improving Leadership Today CHOOSE TO LEAD Make the tough decisions Engage in respectful communication
  • 26. Improving Leadership Today CHOOSE TO LEAD Make the tough decisions Engage in respectful communication Rely on your character and ethics when making decisions
  • 27. Improving Leadership Today CHOOSE TO LEAD Make the tough decisions Engage in respectful communication Rely on your character and ethics when making decisions Delegate to enable employees to grow and experience individual freedom in their roles
  • 28. Improving Leadership Today CHOOSE TO LEAD Make the tough decisions Engage in respectful communication Rely on your character and ethics when making decisions Delegate to enable employees to grow and experience individual freedom in their roles Embrace diversity and understand that your way is not the only way
  • 29. Improving Leadership Today CHOOSE TO LEAD Make the tough decisions Engage in respectful communication Rely on your character and ethics when making decisions Delegate to enable employees to grow and experience individual freedom in their roles Embrace diversity and understand that your way is not the only way Share information freely
  • 30. AN ACME INDUSTRIES PRESENTATION