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Prioritising victims’ needs: victims’ and practitioners’ perspective

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Presentation by Daniela Bolivar Fernandez, PhD in criminology (KULeuven), coordinator research project "Victims and restorative justice", European Forum for Restorative Justice" in conference …

Presentation by Daniela Bolivar Fernandez, PhD in criminology (KULeuven), coordinator research project "Victims and restorative justice", European Forum for Restorative Justice" in conference "Supporting Victims of Crime in Latvia – Possibilities and Challenges" organised by Centre for Public Policy PROVIDUS on February 21-22, 2013 in Riga.
Conference was organized in project "Conference is organized within framework of project Response to Crime Latvia and Beyond”.

Further information about project: http://www.providus.lv/public/26862.html
Further information about conference: http://www.providus.lv/upload_file/Projekti/Kriminalitesibas/Victim%20support/Conference_web.pdf

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Prezentācija "Cietušo vajadzību nozīmīgums: pašu cietušo un profesionāļu skatījums" (Daniela Bolivar Fernandez, Eiropas atjaunojošās justīcijas forums, projekta „Cietušie un atjaunojošā justīcija” pētniece) konferencē "Atbalsta sistēma noziedzīgos nodarījumos cietušajiem – Latvijas iespējas un izaicinājumi".
Konference tika organizēta 2013.gada 21.-22.februārī Rīgā projekta "Atbalsta sistēma noziegumos cietušajiem - Latvijā un citur" ietvaros.

Plašāka informācija par projektu: http://www.providus.lv/public/27560.html
Plašāka informācija par konferenci: http://www.providus.lv/public/27812.html

Published in: News & Politics, Technology

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  • 1. Prioritising victims’ needs: victims’ and practitioners’ perspective Daniela Bolivar, PhD Conference: Supporting Victims of Crime in Latvia: ­Incorporating the EU Dimension February 21-22, 2013 Conference is organized within project “Support for Victims of Crime: Substantial or Nominal. Latvia and Beyond”. Project is financed by European Union#cietušiem // #victimslatvia // @providus
  • 2. Aim of this presentation:What does “prioritising victims’ needs” mean?
  • 3. • Two studies: – My PhD, “Victim-offender mediation and victims’ restoration”, KU Leuven – Research “Project and RJ”, European Forum for RJ
  • 4. Dissertation• Qualitative and quantitative research• Spain and Belgium• Before and after mediation• RQ: the role of mediation in victims’ processes of restoration (can RJ offer more than “satisfaction”?)
  • 5. Project “Victims and RJ” –European Forum for RestorativeJustice• An empirical study of the needs, experiences and position of victims within RJ-practices• Funding: European Commission – Directorate- General Justice, Freedom and Security
  • 6. Partners – Leuven Institute for Criminology (LINC, Leuven, Belgium) – National Institute of Criminal Sciences and Criminology (NICC, Brussels, Belgium) – National Research Institute of Legal Policy (NRILP, Helsinki, Finland), – National Institute for Health and Welfare (NIHW, Helsinki, Finland), University of Helsinki (Finland) – Institute for the Sociology of Law and Criminology (IRKS, Vienna, Austria), – Neustart (Vienna, Austria) – International Victimology Institute Tilburg (Intervict, the Netherlands), – Victim in Focus (Slachtoffer in Beeld, Utrecht, the Netherlands) – The project runs in cooperation with Victim Support Europe (VSE)
  • 7. What did we want to know? What are the needs, experiences and position of victims when participating in restorative justice programmes? How are restorative justice programmes organised and run with regard to the inclusion of victims?
  • 8. How? – Research design Macro level  Implementation RJ & VS practitionersMicro level  Victims’ experiences Victims of crime
  • 9. How? – Research design: “The arrow”• Three countries / approaches: Finland, Austria, The Netherlands Neutral Offender-oriented Victim-oriented Finland Austria The Netherlands
  • 10. What does “prioritising victims’ needs” mean for VS and RJ practitioners?
  • 11.   Mean Mean RJ VSVulnerable victims cannot participate in mediation 2.23 3.17processesVulnerable victims cannot participate in mediation 3.03 3.49processes unless they are accompanied by support people(e.g. family member)Vulnerable victims cannot participate in mediation 2.15 3.29processes unless they are assessed by a professional (e.g.psychologist)Traumatized victims cannot participate in mediation 2.49 3.29processes
  • 12.  (scale 1-5) Mean Mean RJ VSTraumatized victims cannot participate in mediation 3 3.31processes unless they are accompanied by support people(e.g. family member)Traumatized victims cannot participate in mediation 2.58 3.11processes unless they are assessed by a professional (e.g.psychologist)Restorative justice is not meant to be for victims that are 1.78 2.46experiencing negative feelings as a consequence of theoffence (such as anger or revenge)
  • 13.   (scale 1-5) Mean Mean RJ VSRJ practices (conferencing, mediation) should be offered to 3.55 2.91all victims, regardless victims’ circumstancesRJ practices (conferencing, mediation) should be offered to 3.43 3.03all victims, regardless type of crimeRJ practices (conferencing, mediation) should be offered to 3.67 2.83all victims, regardless moment of the criminal justiceprocess
  • 14.   (scale 1-5) Mean Mean RJ VSRJ works better when applied to minor crimes 2.16 2.91RJ works better when applied to serious crimes 2.47 2.06RJ can work fine in all type of crimes 4.08 2.69
  • 15. What does “prioritising victims’needs” mean for VSpractitioners?• RJ: a victim-centred practice• Vulnerability and RJ• Types of crime and RJ• Support people and the victim in RJ
  • 16. What does “prioritising victims’needs” mean for RJ practitioners?• RJ: a “RJ-centred” practice• Vulnerability and RJ• Types of crime and RJ• Support people and the victim in RJ
  • 17. What does “prioritising victims’needs in RJ” mean for victims?• RJ: an “impartial” practice• Vulnerability and RJ• Types of crime and RJ• Support people and the victim in RJ
  • 18. Final thoughts• RJ: A practice responsive to people’s needs• Risks to keep in mind• RJ implementation: a common understanding of what “prioritising victims’ needs” means based on the victim perspective
  • 19. Thanks for your attentiondaniela.bolivar@law.kuleuven.be