Women Through Time - ProQuest History Vault
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Women Through Time - ProQuest History Vault

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  • Collections you would have to visit to access the content.From these collections, we have created the content for the modules in History VaultUpper right:  Chicago history museumCenter right: Carter pres libraryLower right: Smith college Top center:  Arch II in College Park MDCenter:  LCLower Center:  Harvard Law Upper Left  AP HQLower Left:  Bush library 
  • A little background on how we have handled the collections
  • We always preserve the original archival arrangement. We don’t move documents or folders around. We respect the archivist’s decisions in arranging the collections. When you retrieve all docs in a collection, they are ordered in the original arrangement in your results. If you sort by accession number, it also arranges the folders the way they were originally in the archive.
  • Today, I am going to talk about the women’s studies and how you can see wonderful examples of women throughout history using History Vault. Before we view the content through, we’ll have a quick look at the interface. Right now, you’re looking at the homepage. Along the top you can see the lines to the Advanced Search page, and links to Browse Events, Browse Collections, our product libguide, the “about” statement, and the help.
  • When a user starts typing, the type-ahead feature is there to help users with typos, and to drive them toward content in the product.
  • Browse events shows only events in modules you may have purchased.
  • Browse collections – for each collection within a module there is a URL and a description of the collection. From this page users can search within the collection using the search box or retrieve all documents in the collection.
  • Narrow results by… (the filters on the left) includes subject, geography, person as subject, federal agency, organizations, collections, and principal correspondent.Users can also use the full text search box to narrow results.
  • This is our History Vault Guide. There are pages about how to search, our webinars, an the modules that have been released and the modules yet to come.
  • So today we will be looking at History Vault using the very broad theme of Women through Time to highlight content in various modules.
  • Right now we have 6.5 million pages online – that is 9 modules consisting of 343 collections. By the end of 2013 we will have 9.3 million pages online – we will be up to 15 modules consisting of 442 collections. So that you don’t have to do the math in your head J that is 2.8 million pages, 6 modules, and 99 collections going up this year.  So there is a LOT of content there on all kinds of topics.Given the size of the collections, there are many themes we could use to look at History Vault – labor relations, employment, Civil Rights, and more – but we had to choose just one!
  • This first module consists of collections from the records of federal government agencies. Here are just a few that are included: • Peonage Files of the U.S. Department of Justice, 1901-1945• Department of Justice Classified Subject Files on Civil Rights, 1914-1949 • New Deal Agencies and Black America • Records of the Tuskegee Airmen,• President Truman’s Committee on Civil Rights• Records from the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations• FBI Files on Martin Luther King Jr. • Civil Rights during the Bush Administration is on pg 63 in file.
  • I wanted to show you an example of the metadata for each folder digitized.And here is Rosa Parks being fingerprinted.http://web.lexis-nexis.com/histvault?q=001339-001-0133
  • The Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century, Organizational Records and Personal Papers contains two outstanding collections that are important for women’s studies researchers. The first is Mary McLeod Bethune Papers – Bethune Papers document her remarkable life, especially her career as an educator and founder of Bethune-Cookman College, her friendship with Walter White of NAACP and Eleanor Roosevelt, her role as a member of FDR’s so-called “Black Cabinet” (Federal Council on Negro Affairs). Highlights of the collection include several autobiographical statements by Bethune, her speeches and writings, and her wide-ranging correspondence. One of the important speeches in the collection, for example, is the speech entitled “Negro Women Facing Tomorrow delivered to the 1941 Convention of the National Association of Colored Women. The first page of this speech is shown on the right side of this slide. This collection also has a small series of photos pertaining to Bethune’s life and Bethune-Cookman College. One of those photos, showing Bethune in front of the United States Capitol is shown on the left side of this slide.
  • This is one of my favorite documents in the Bethune collection – an oral history including some of her formative years.
  • This is one of my favorite documents in the Bethune collection – an oral history including some of her formative years.
  • This is one of my favorite documents in the Bethune collection – an oral history including some of her formative years.
  • Another important Black Freedom Struggle collection of key interest to women’s studies researchers is the records of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs, the oldest African American women’s organization in the United States. The collection features minutes from the organization’s conventions from 1897-1992. Shown here are documents from the first convention in 1897, the 1914 meeting and the 50 anniversary meeting in 1946. The records of the NACWC also include documents on the organization’s state and local affiliates, publication of the national office, and materials on important leaders like Mary Church Terrell, and Margaret Murray.Also in this module on the topic of women’s rights, women leaders of SCLC like Ella Baker, and documentation on Coretta Scott King in SCLC papers and Martin Luther King FBI FileIn Federal Government Records: Records of the Women’s Bureau in Black Workers in the Era of the Great Migration Civil Rights during the Nixon administration includes some files pertaining to women’s rights, equal rights amendment, and women’s employmentDepartment of Justice Classified Subject Files on Civil Rights includes letters from the YWCA in support of anti-lynching legislation
  • NAACP Papers is one of History Vault’s most high profile collections and it is an outstanding collection for the study of the civil rights movement. The NAACP is arguably the most important civil rights organization of the 20th century. For students of women’s studies, one important fact about the NAACP is that many of its important leaders, both at the national and local level were women. Here we see a leader of the Chicago NAACP branch, Miss Josephine Fulton, a letter from Ella J. Baker, the director of branches in the 1940s, and longtime and influential NAACP regional director Ruby Hurley.
  • This document is from the NAACP 1963 annual convention. It shows the NAACP national officers and field secretaries in 1963, 8 of whom are women.Over the years, the following women held key leadership roles in the NAACP. History Vault includes documents by or about each of them: Mary White OvingtonRuby HurleyJuanita Jackson MitchellDaisy LampkinDaisy BatesElla BakerRosa ParksAlthea SimmonsConstance Baker MotleyMyrlie EversLulu B. WhiteMildred BondBobbie BrancheJune ShagaloffGertrude GormanTarea Hall PittmanLucille Black
  • The Slavery and the Law module is an excellent source for women’s studies researchers because of the 700+ divorce petitions in the Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks collections. On this slide, we have one petition – the petition is on the right side of the slide and a petition analysis record is on the left side. Each petition in Slavery and the Law is preceded by a petition analysis record. These records were compiled over a 5 year period by Loren Schweninger and his team of researchers at University of North Carolina-Greensboro. The petition analysis records include detailed descriptions of the petitions, with the names of the petitioners, defendants, the location of the petition, date, and a detailed abstract of the petition. These petition analysis records make it for easy for researchers to search the slavery petitions material in the Slavery and the Law module.
  • Here is another divorce petition with slightly different circumstances from the petition on the previous slide.In this petition, Sarah E. York of Houston County, Georgia, seeks a divorce from her husband William York after 3 years of marriage. She accused William of wicked and cruel conduct which includes adulterous behavior, and she asks for temporary alimony and legal fees until the divorce was finalized.
  • And here are 3 more petition analysis records showing some of the amazing detail in the petition records. There more than 700 divorce petitions in the Slavery and the Law module allowing opportunities for both statistical studies as well as more descriptive studies. The first one on the upper left is a man seeking a divorce from his wife because he accused her of having children with men other than him.On the upper right, Elizabeth Wilhoyte sought a divorce because she said her husband was visiting houses of “public prostitution and ill fame.” In addition to the divorce, she also asked for custody of the children.And in the petition at the bottom, Mary Holcombe sought a divorce because she said her husband was a common drunkard, and vicious and dangerous. She sought a divorce, alimony, and custody of her child.
  • Ok, moving on to the 20th century and a very different topic.The American Politics and Society from Kennedy to Watergate module, that was released at the end of September has two interesting collections from presidential commissions on women. These collections are the Records of the President’s Commission on the Status of Women, a commission appointed by President Kennedy, and the records of the Citizen’s Advisory Council on the Status of Women, the successor to the President’s Commission on the Status of Women. Here above you see a transcript of one of the commissions meetings. The meeting transcripts are a great research source because they show the commission members frankly stating their views on occasionally controversial topics.
  • As opposed to our domestic policy module we just talked about, this is the foreign policy module for the same time perion – 1960-1975.It covers the U.S. involvement in the region from the early days of the Kennedy administration, through the escalation of the war during the Johnson administration, to the final resolution of the war at the Paris Peace Talks and the evacuation of U.S. troops. Along the way, documents in this module trace the actions and decisions at the highest levels of the U.S. foreign policy apparatus, as well as events on the ground in Vietnam, from the perspective of State Department officials, Associated Press reporters, and members of the U.S. Armed forces, including the Marines and the Military Assistance Command Vietnam.These images are from the Associated Press, Saigon Bureau Records, Series 1: News Reports, 1953, 1960-71 in Vietnam War and American Foreign Policy, 1960-1975A couple of stories where women are mentioned. Descriptive Title= U.S. and South Vietnamese military activity in VietnamStories about a presidential candidate, and a female terrorist in the AP files.
  • As opposed to our domestic policy module we just talked about, this is the foreign policy module for the same time perion – 1960-1975.It covers the U.S. involvement in the region from the early days of the Kennedy administration, through the escalation of the war during the Johnson administration, to the final resolution of the war at the Paris Peace Talks and the evacuation of U.S. troops. Along the way, documents in this module trace the actions and decisions at the highest levels of the U.S. foreign policy apparatus, as well as events on the ground in Vietnam, from the perspective of State Department officials, Associated Press reporters, and members of the U.S. Armed forces, including the Marines and the Military Assistance Command Vietnam.These images are from the Associated Press, Saigon Bureau Records, Series 1: News Reports, 1953, 1960-71 in Vietnam War and American Foreign Policy, 1960-1975A couple of stories where women are mentioned. Descriptive Title= U.S. and South Vietnamese military activity in VietnamStories about a presidential candidate, and a female terrorist in the AP files.
  • As opposed to our domestic policy module we just talked about, this is the foreign policy module for the same time perion – 1960-1975.It covers the U.S. involvement in the region from the early days of the Kennedy administration, through the escalation of the war during the Johnson administration, to the final resolution of the war at the Paris Peace Talks and the evacuation of U.S. troops. Along the way, documents in this module trace the actions and decisions at the highest levels of the U.S. foreign policy apparatus, as well as events on the ground in Vietnam, from the perspective of State Department officials, Associated Press reporters, and members of the U.S. Armed forces, including the Marines and the Military Assistance Command Vietnam.These images are from the Associated Press, Saigon Bureau Records, Series 1: News Reports, 1953, 1960-71 in Vietnam War and American Foreign Policy, 1960-1975A couple of stories where women are mentioned. Descriptive Title= U.S. and South Vietnamese military activity in VietnamStories about a presidential candidate, and a female terrorist in the AP files.
  • Image: 1928 letter from Rachel O’Connor In collection #002422  (Records of Antebellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series I: Selections from Louisiana State University, Part 6: David Weeks and Family Collection)The Weeks papers contain the personal correspondence of several extraordinary women who, after being widowed, managed their own plantations. They include Rachel O'Connor, Mary Weeks Moore, and Harriet Weeks Meade. Rachel O'Connor, David Weeks' half-sister, wrote dozens of letters to family members between 1823 and her death in 1846. Twice-widowed, Rachel's letters describe routine matters of her life as mistress of Evergreen Plantation on Bayou Sarah near St. Francisville, Louisiana, such as the condition of her crops and her garden and the ordering of provisions, as well as her aches and pains and the all-too-frequent illnesses and deaths of her family members and slaves
  • Also in this collection are some diaries.Susanna Warfield's diaries, which span the years 1845-1885, contain descriptions of her daily activities and observations, religious activities, finances, family life, and health. Martha Foreman’s diaries cover similar ground and more. Foreman, the mistress of "Rose Hill" Plantation in Cecil County, Maryland, recorded the wide variety of domestic and agricultural activities on her plantation, including the production of textiles, butchering of animals, fruit harvests, food preservation, and seasonal cleaning. Martha, the wife of Major General Thomas Marsh Forman, led an active social life and traveled frequently. Her diary also sheds some light on her emotional life, with many entries expressing longing for her husband (who was frequently away), and concern for his health.  Image: Susanna Warfield Daily Diary, Martha Forman DiaryIn collection #002386 (Records of Antebellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series D: Selections from the Maryland Historical Society)
  • This is Sidney Harding's diary.She was the daughter of a plantation owner, and her family was forced to flee their home in the wake of troop movements into the area. They lived as refugees in a log cabin in Keachie, Louisiana. She writes frequently of the differences between her current situation and life in her family’s plantation mansion. However impoverished they became, the Harding family maintained an active social life.Entries on dancing, singing, supper parties, and other social events occur frequently in the diary. Also included are poignant descriptions of soldiers and of the battlefield after the Battle of Pleasant Hill on April 9, 1864.Sidney Harding's life as a Civil War refugee in Keatchie, Louisiana with a description of the battlefield after the Battle of Pleasant HillIn collection #002422 (Records of Antebellum Southern Plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War, Series I: Selections from Louisiana State University, Part 1: Louisiana Sugar Plantations)Also unique to this collection is the diary of Miss Sidney Harding.
  • And now on to the women’s rights module that went live in December. This module consists of three collections: National Woman’s Party, League of Women Voters, Women’s Action Alliance.The importance of the National Woman’s Party as a women’s rights group fighting for the suffrage amendment and then supporting the ERA cannot be understated in terms of the total perspective of 20th Century American Women’s History. Compared with other women’s organizations, the NWP’s sole devotion to equal rights was unique, unheralded, and according to some historians, advanced for its time.The National Woman’s Party grew out of the Congressional Committee of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). In April 1913, members of the Congressional Committee formed the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage as an affiliated society of NAWSA and in 1914 the Congressional Union became an independent organization. The most unique feature of the Congressional Union was its activist approach. It lobbied Congress and the president, held public parades and meetings, sent speakers throughout the country, and formed state branches. In 1916 the National Woman’s Party was formed by the enfranchised members of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage. The two organizations coexisted for one year until 1917 when they merged to become the National Woman’s Party. A large portion of the National woman’s party collection consists of correspondence pertaining to the suffrage fight that culminated in the passage of the nineteenth amendment giving women the right to vote, and then the ultimately unsuccessful campaign for an Equal Rights Amendment.
  • Here are two more examples of some the letters on the suffrage campaign, including a lieeter to Alice Paul, the key leader of the National Woman’s Party. Paul was a key proponent of the activist approach, and she was the original author of the Equal Rights Amendment in 1923.
  • The National Woman’s Party Papers includes a small series of photographs. The photographs include portraits and photographs of actions by the National Woman’s Party and affiliated organizations. Most History Vault collections do not include that many if any photographs, so these photographs add a nice dimension to the National woman’s Party collection
  • Another interesting part of the National Woman’s Party Papers is a series of about 200 cartoons pertaining to the suffrage campaign.
  • And here are two more cartoons – the item on the left is a revised version of the famous painting by Archibald MacNeal Willard called the Spirit of 76. the original name for the painting was Yankee Doodle but here instead of being in the revolutionary war, they are marching for the suffrage amendment. And the cartoon on the right, the caption says “training the animals” and elephant and a donkey, the mascots or symbols of the Republican Party and Democratic Party
  • The second organization covered in this module is the League of Women VotersThe League of Women Voters occupies a unique place in American political and women's history. Its brand of intensive study, training for citizenship, and sophisticated political action shows one direction that women took in public life after they won the vote in 1920.The League consistently took strong stands on the major governmental questions of the day and lobbied aggressively for causes it believed in.No less than sixty-nine items were singled out for action at the first convention in 1920.The collection features the minutes of the Board of Directors offer outlines of the deliberations about policy, as well as reports and other supporting material about how their plans were implemented. The Board of Directors papers also contain valuable material on the structure and finances of the organization. The broad sweep of these records offers an opportunity to examine the national leadership over a six-decade period. The League collection also includes transcripts of the national conventions and subject files on topics like fundraising, membership, and interaction with other women’s organizations such as the National Consumers League, the American Association of University Women, the National Women's Trade Union League, the General Federation of Women's Clubs, the Young Women's Christian Association, and the National Council of Jewish Women.
  • The third set of papers in this module are the records of the Women’s Action AllianceThe Women's Action Alliance (WAA) was founded in 1971 to coordinate resources for organizations and individuals involved in the women's movement on the grass-roots level. Founders included Gloria Steinem, Brenda Feigen, and Catherine Samuels. The organization's original mission was “to stimulate and assist women at the local level to organize around specific action projects aimed at eliminating concrete manifestations of economic and social discrimination.” In the early years, several well-known figures—including Bella Abzug, Shirley Chisholm, John Kenneth Galbraith, and Maya Miller—were appointed to the Alliance's board of directors.The records of the Women’s Action Alliance included in History Vault cover the general operations of the WAA as well as the many programs pursued by the WAA. These programs focused on education, employment, and health. On this slide, you see some images from the WAA’s employment projects, including a flyer from its non-traditional occupations for women program on the left and documents pertaining to its publication called Struggling through Tight Times.
  • The Women’s Action Alliance ran several different educational initiatives. One of these was its Non-sexist child development project which the WAA launched in 1972. This project was one of the WAA’s longest run initiatives. Its stated goal was to “counteract the destructiveness of sex-role stereotyping”The records pertaining to this project include correspondence, financial records, and some project materials.Another important WAA education project was its Beginning Equal Project. The principal objective of this project was similar to the Non-Sexist Child development project but it targeted younger children. Its objective was to "to foster nonsexist childrearing and educational environments for children ages 0 to three.“ The WAA published a manual for this project and the cover for a draft of the manual is shown on the right side of this slide., Portable Women’s History Museum Project, Institute on Women’s History, Project REED [Resource on Educational Equity for the Disabled] and Project TREE – Training Resources for Educational Equity
  • A third key area for the Women’s Action Alliance involved projects relating to women’s health.These projects were the Resource Mothers Project, the Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Project, and the Women’s Alcohol and Drug Education Project,
  • I talked about other themes that one could research using History Vault – here is a short list. Using the “Browse events” page in the product, you get many many more examples. Each module is rich with content for the researcher. Employment discrimination – documents pertaining to NAACP, African Americans and women, and court cases in Harvard Law materials, and presidential documents pertaining to employment discrimination·         Civil rights legislation – pertaining to African Americans and women·         Brown v. Board of Education – the NAACP, Black Freedom, and Harvard Law modules contain documentation offering different perspectives on the Brown case. ·         The World War II homefront – World War II marked an important moment in the Black Freedom struggle and protest activity during World War is documented in the NAACP Papers and the two black Freedom modules. The National Women’s Party collection and League of Women Voters collections also document how these two organizations worked and responded to conditions during the war.·         Vietnam War – search to see how the NAACP and other civil rights and women’s rights organizations reacted to the Vietnam WarAnd now I’m going to had the microphone over to Rachel Hallywho will talk about the offerings coming in 2013.

Women Through Time - ProQuest History Vault Women Through Time - ProQuest History Vault Presentation Transcript

  • ProQuest History Vault Women Through Time January 26, 2013
  • Collections from all over thecountry including: the National Archives Library of Congress Harvard Law School Library Duke University Virginia Historical Society, and Presidential Libraries And many more…. .
  • Provides access to content notaccessible unless you visit thearchive
  • A bit about History Vault Archival records are normally unpublished and almost always unique, unlike books or magazines, in which many identical copies exist. Typically, the arrangement of these materials reflects the provenance of the collection and may be arranged by source or type of document. This organization is crucial in understanding the context of each document relative to others within the collection.
  • Document Organization  The original archival arrangement is preserved so archivist’s decisions in arranging the collections is respected  When all docs in a collection are retrieved, they are ordered in the original arrangement in the results.  If results are sorted by accession no., folders are arranged the way they were originally in the archive.
  • ProQuest History Vault
  • Searching ProQuest History Vault
  • ProQuest History Vault
  • ProQuest History Vault – Browse Events
  • ProQuest History Vault – Browse Collections
  • Searching ProQuest History Vault
  • Our Guide
  • Our Guide – sample contents tab
  • Our Guide – coming in 2013
  • ProQuest History Vault Women Through Time
  • What is available? Year end Year end 2012 2013 Modules 9 15 Collections 343 442 Pages 6.5 million 9.3 million
  • Black Freedom Struggle in the 20thCentury – Fed Govt Records
  • Black Freedom Struggle in the 20thCentury – Fed Govt Records
  • Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century – PersonalPapers Mary McLeod Bethune Papers
  • Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century Mary McLeod Bethune Papers
  • Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century, cont. Mary McLeod Bethune Papers
  • Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century, cont. Mary McLeod Bethune Papers
  • Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century Records of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs
  • NAACP Papers
  • NAACP Papers
  • Slavery and the Law Divorce petitions and petitions pertaining to children
  • Slavery and the Law Divorce petitions and petitions pertaining to children
  • Slavery and the Law Divorce petitions and petitions pertaining to children
  • American Politics and Society from Kennedy toWatergate
  • The Vietnam War and AmericanForeign Policy, 1960-1975
  • The Vietnam War and AmericanForeign Policy, 1960-1975, cont.
  • The Vietnam War and AmericanForeign Policy, 1960-1975, cont.
  • Records of Antebellum Southern Plantationsfrom the Revolution through the Civil War,Series I
  • Records of Antebellum Southern Plantationsfrom the Revolution through the Civil War,Series I Martha Foreman Diary Susanna Warfield Diary
  • Records of Antebellum Southern Plantationsfrom the Revolution through the Civil War,Series I
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 National Woman’s Party Papers, 1913-1974
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 National Woman’s Party Papers, 1913-1974
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 National Woman’s Party Papers, 1913-1974
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 National Woman’s Party Papers, 1913-1974
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 National Woman’s Party Papers, 1913-1974
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 -- League of Women Voters
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 -- Women’s Action Alliance
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 -- Women’s Action Alliance
  • Struggle for Women’s Rights, Organizational Records,1880-1990 -- Women’s Action Alliance
  • Other themes  Employment discrimination  Civil rights legislation  Brown v. Board of Education  The World War II homefront  Vietnam War
  • Coming up in 2013 … Six new modules  Immigration: Records of the INS, 1880-1930 (March 2013)  NAACP Papers: The NAACPs Major Campaigns—Scottsboro, Anti- Lynching, Criminal Justice, Peonage, Labor, and Segregation and Discrimination Complaints and Responses(April 2013)  Women’s Studies Manuscript Collections from the Schlesinger Library: Voting Rights, National Politics, and Reproductive Rights (May 2013)  NAACP Papers, The NAACP’s Major Campaigns—Legal Department Files (June 2013)  Law and Society since the Civil War: American Legal Manuscripts from the Harvard Law School Library (October 2013)  World War II: U.S. Documents on Planning, Operations, Intelligence, Axis War Crimes, and Refugees (November 2013)