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The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
The Planning Process for Emergency Management
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The Planning Process for Emergency Management

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Planning process adapted from FEMA\'s CPG 101 v. 2

Planning process adapted from FEMA\'s CPG 101 v. 2

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  • This presentation was adapted from FEMA’s Developing and Maintaining Emergency Operations Plans, Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101 Version 2.0, November 2010Do you notice anything about this picture?All it takes is for 1 gear to be out of place and the process locks up. You want to make sure have the right people and in the right place to keep the process moving.
  • Failure to include groups in planning (such as advocates for those with access or functional needs) will lead to mistakes and/or shortfalls in capability and resource requirements.
  • It can also lead to this – 1 or more people carrying more than their share of the load.This not only has potentially harmful consequences for them but the entire community as well.Disasters begin and end locally. After the response is over, it is the local community that lives with the decisions made during the incident.
  • When the planning process is used consistently during the preparedness phase, its use during operations becomes second nature. The goal is to make the planning process routine across all phases of emergency management. Does planning stop during a response or during recovery?
  • Collaborative Planning TeamAlthough individual planners can use this process, it is most effective when used by a planning team.One goal of using a planning team is to build and expand relationships that help bring creativity and innovation to planning. This approach helps establish a planning routine, so that processes followed before an incident occurs are the same as those used during and following an incident.Core Planning TeamInitially, the team should be small, consisting of planners from organizations that usually participate in emergency or homeland security operations.A jurisdiction might want to base the core planning team’s membership on the EOP structure it uses (Functional or ESF).Regardless of the core planning team structure, the involvement of executives from the member agencies, departments, or CIKR organizations is critical. They are able to speak with authority on policy, provide subject matter expertise, and provide accountability as it relates to their agency or department.Engage the Whole CommunityPlanning that is for the whole community and involves the whole community is crucial to the success of any plan.Determining how to effectively engage the community in this planning process is one of the biggest challenges faced by planners.Communities of interest go beyond geographical and political boundaries, because they center on physical, social, cultural, or philosophical structures (civic, social, faith-based, professional, advocacy).It is critical to include civic leaders, members of the public, and representatives of community based organizations in the planning process. They may serve as an important resource for validating assumptions about public needs, capabilities, and reactions.
  • Understand the SituationEffective risk management depends on a consistent comparison of the hazards a particular jurisdiction faces. This focuses on gathering information about the jurisdiction’s planning framework, potential risks, resource base, demographics, household pet and service animal population, and geographic characteristics that could affect emergency operations.Identify threats & hazardsThreat assessments prepared for or by agencies may provide information on potential “soft targets” and threats within the jurisdiction.Federal and state analyses that include data about historical incidents faced by the community also provide valuable information for this step.In 2009 and 2010 NEMA conducted a statewide Hazard Identification Risk Analysis followed by regional capabilities assessment workshops which helped jurisdictions prioritize threats and assess their plans, resources and capabilities. Assess riskThe risk assessment is the basis for EOP development. The assessment helps a planning team decide what hazards or threats merit special attention, what actions must be planned for, and what resources are likely to be needed.
  • Determine operational prioritiesOperational priorities specify what the responding organizations are to accomplish to achieve a desired end-state for the operation.Planners are looking for requirements generated by the hazard or threat, the response, and by constraints/restraints. (Constraint=“must do”, Restraint=“must not do” i.e. laws, regulations, physical characteristics, resource limitations)Scenario based requirements that determine actions and resources are restated by the planning team as priorities which are affirmed with the senior official.Set goals & objectivesGoals are broad, general statements that indicate the intended solution to problems identified by planners during the previous step (2 – Understand the Situation). They help identify when major elements of the response are complete and when the operation is successful. (i.e. Complete evacuation before levees are breached.) Objectives are more specific and identifiable actions carried out during the operation. (i.e. Complete evacuation of permanent residents 24 hours before flood waters close I-80.)Goals and objectives must be carefully crafted to ensure they support accomplishing the plan mission and operational priorities. This enables unity of effort and consistency of purpose among the multiple groups and activities involved in executing the plan.
  • Develop & analyze courses of actionWhen developing courses of actions, planners depict how an operation unfolds by building a portrait of the incident’s actions, decision points, and participant activities. (Scenario Based?)This process helps planners identify tasks that occur immediately at incident initiation, tasks that are more mid-incident focused, and tasks that affect long-term operations.Identify resourcesOnce courses of action are selected, the planning team identifies resources needed to accomplish tasks without regard to resource availability. The object is to identify the resources needed to make the operation work.This step provides planners an opportunity to identify resource shortfalls to be addressed.A capability estimate is a planner’s assessment of a jurisdiction’s ability to take a course of action. Capability estimates help planners decide if pursuing a particular course of action is realistic and supportable. The resulting capability estimate will feed into the resource section/annex of the plan.Identify information & intelligence needsPlanners should identify the information and intelligence they will need and the deadline(s) for receiving it to drive decisions and trigger critical actions.
  • Write the planThis step turns the results of course of action development into an EOP. The planning team develops a rough draft of the plan, and as they work through successive drafts the members add necessary information. The planning team prepares and circulates a final draft to obtain comments of organizations that have responsibilities for implementing the plan.Review the planPlanners should check the written plan for its conformity to applicable regulatory requirements and the standards of federal or state agencies, as appropriate, and for its usefulness in practice. Reviews of plans allow other agencies with emergency or homeland security responsibilities to suggest improvements to a plan on the basis of their accumulated experience.Approve & disseminate the planOnce the plan has been validated, the planner should present the plan to the appropriate elected officials and obtain official promulgation of the plan. The promulgation should be based in a specific statute, law, or ordinance (i.e. Nebraska Emergency Management Act). Once the senior official grants approval, the planner should arrange to distribute the plan and maintain a record of the people and organizations that received a copy (or copies) of the plan. “Sunshine laws may require that a copy of the plan be posted on the jurisdiction’s website or some other public accessible location.
  • After developing a plan, it must be disseminated and personnel need to be trained so they have the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to perform the tasks identified in the plan.Exercise the planEvaluating the effectiveness of plans involves a combination of training events, exercises, and real-world incidents to determine whether the goals, objectives, decisions, actions, and timing outlined in the plan led to a successful response. In this way, homeland security and other emergency preparedness exercise programs become an integral part of the planning process.Review, revise & maintain the planThis step closes the loop in the planning process. It focuses on adding the information gained by exercising the plan to the research collected in Step 2 and starting the planning cycle over again. Remember, planning is a continuous process that does not stop when the plan is published. Plans should evolve as lessons are learned, new information and insights are obtained, and priorities are updated.Planning teams should establish a process for reviewing and revising the plan. Reviews should be a recurring activity. Some jurisdictions have found it useful to review and revise portions of their EOPs every month. Many accomplish their reviews on an annual basis.
  • While it remains twisted together, the threefold cord is not easily broken, but if the threads are untwisted and unloosed, they are soon snapped apart.This is taught in the fable of the bundle of sticks the old man gave to his sons to break; which, while fastened together, could not be done; but, when taken out singly, they were easily snapped apart; teaching them how unity among themselves, was their greatest security against their common enemy.This goes back to the idea of planning in a vacuum. Rather than having a one person planning process, strive to incorporate a planning process that’s collaborative and includes an effective representation of your community.Eccl. 4:12
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Planning ProcessPatrick RooneyPlanning SpecialistNebraska Emergency Management Agency402-471-7438patrick.rooney@nebraska.gov
    • 2. A perfect vacuumwould be one with no particles in it at all
    • 3. So you don’t end up like this!
    • 4. 6 Steps of the Planning Process: 1. Form a collaborative planning team 2. Understand the situation 3. Determine goals and objectives 4. Plan development 5. Plan preparation, review and approval 6. Plan implementation and maintenance
    • 5. Step 1: Form a Collaborative Planning Team • Identify a core planning team • Engage the whole community in planning
    • 6. Step 2: Understand the Situation • Identify threats and hazards • Assess risk
    • 7. Step 3: Determine Goals and Objectives • Determine operational priorities • Set goals and objectives
    • 8. Step 4: Plan Development • Develop and analyze courses of action • Identify resources • Identify information and intelligence needs
    • 9. Step 5: Plan Preparation, Review and Approval• Write the plan• Review the plan• Approve and disseminate the plan
    • 10. Step 6: Plan Implementation and Maintenance • Exercise the plan • Review, revise and maintain the plan
    • 11. A threefoldcord is notquicklybroken.

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