September to November

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September to November

  1. 1. THE COLOR PURPLE Business Psychology for Personal and Leadership Development
  2. 2. THE COLOUR PURPLE Business Psychology for Personal and Leadership Development
  3. 3. Marquee designs in America are closely related to the social, political, and economic forces of the 20th century. The invention of the automobile influenced many elements of theater architecture. The marquee in particular became larger, and stood out from the street to serve as a physical and aesthetic landmark from other businesses along the sidewalk. The shape also evolved from a small rectangle to a trapezoid, making it more readable to automobile traffic. The text also became less detailed but larger. The larger size of the sign and text, combined with the flashing lights and color, made the façade easily visible to fast-passing cars. Movie marquee designs in the 1930s prompted theater historian Ben M. Hall to call them "electric tiaras." During World War II, aesthetic considerations of the marquee were dictated by the availability of labor and materials. Building materials such as steel, copper, bronze, and aluminum were limited. Even in the postwar years, these building materials were mostly dedicated to building civilian housing for returning soldiers and their families. Concrete and glass, two building materials that were not restricted, became essential to movie theater architects. Light was also an unrestricted resource for architects, and combined with glass it produced striking visual effects. The mild climate of certain locations, such as the West Coast, also permitted the use of lightweight materials such as porcelain and plastics in marquees. Another benefit of using light and glass together (besides the dramatic appearance it created) was the economic bonus of it being cheap. My Concept Storewill explain how to take a good research idea and develop it into a testable hypothesis in the lab. Topics covered include how to solicit feedback on a research idea, how to carefully define aims and milestones, and how to ensure you achieve meaningful results, regardless of specific outcome. The session will discuss how to take a clinical observation and turn it into a research project, how to define clinically relevant outcomes, and how to involve statisticians to ensure outstanding research design.
  4. 4. TAPPING THE HIDDEN JOB MARKET BRAND IDENTITY THE GREGARIOUS AMERICAN FMCG PACKAGING DRESS FOR THE JOB BRAND STRATEGY SELL THE BENEFIT OF THE PRODUCT NAMING INSPIRED HEALTH & AGED CARE BRAND EXPERIENCE VISIBILITY PRODUCT DESIGN TRADITION FROM $99 PER PERSON PLAN SABA CONVENTION FROM $79 PER PERSON DO DIFFUSION BELIEF FROM $69 PER PERSON CHECK LABEL ANECDOTAL EVIDENCE FROM $79 PER PERSON ACT
  5. 5. A nursery is a place where plants are propagated and grown to usable size. They include retail nurseries that sell to the general public, wholesalenurseries that sell only to businesses such as other nurseries and to commercial gardeners, and private nurseries which supply the needs of institutions or private estates. Some retail and wholesale nurseries sell by mail. Although the popular image of a nursery is that of a supplier of garden plants, the range of nursery functions is far wider, and is of vital importance to many branches of agriculture, forestry and conservation biology. Some nurseries specialize in one phase of the process: propagation, growing out, or retail sale; or in one type of plant: e.g., groundcovers, shade plants, or rock garden plants. Some produce bulk stock, whether seedlings or grafted, of particular varieties for purposes such as fruit trees for orchards, or timber trees for forestry. Some produce stock seasonally, ready in springtime for export to colder regions where propagation could not have been started so early, or to regions where seasonal pests prevent profitable growing early in the season. Copyright © 2013 Anna Katis, Customer Service

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