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Media Accessibility For The Web

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Media Accessibility for the Web …

Media Accessibility for the Web
Central TxDLA Meeting
January 29, 2008

Published in: Technology, Design

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  • 1. Central TxDLA Meeting, January 29, 2008
  • 2.
    • Who we are
    • Captioning benefits
    • Multi-Language
    • Formats
    • Players and Tools
  • 3.
    • Full service captioning company
      • Rhino Moon Captioning
      • Project readOn
    • My goals
      • Promote accessibility: information resource
      • Work with you to deliver accessible media
  • 4.
    • Reach a wider audience (up to 30 million US)
    • Legal compliance
    • ESL audience, and vice versa
    • Noisy environments, or devices with no sound
    • Increase comprehension of educational material
    • On the web: indexing and search
    • Transcript
  • 5.
    • Captions can be provided in multiple languages
    • This can aid in learning a language, and can improve comprehension for ESL students
    • Captions vs subtitles? Captions usually convey sound effects, subtitles convey only spoken conversation
    • Various formats support more language fonts depending on encoding standards (various Unicode standards)
  • 6.
    • Media formats:
    • Flash (FLV) – Most portable and efficient, most options for accessibility. This is 80-90% of the media content on the web.
    • Quicktime – Some accessibility issues, issues with screen readers, can support captions
    • Windows Media – Middle of the road, supports captions and subtitles
    • Real Player – Supports caption text, subtitles, and overdub tracks, least popular media format
  • 7.
    • File Formats:
    • DFXP - W3C standard for Timed Text Authoring Format
    • SMIL – (Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language) W3c standard for XML markup for multimedia presentations
    • .SRT – Subtitle file format, YouTube’s officially supported format
    • SAMI – Microsoft format designed for caption playback on a PC
  • 8.
    • Players: (all Flash players)
    • Project readOn Player (you host the FLV, we do the rest)
    • YouTube (they host everything, you upload .SRT in multiple languages)
    • Google Video (good, but going away soon)
    • JW Player (great player, most options available)
    • NCAM Flash Player (another good option)
    • Adobe Plugin (requires development on your part)
    • Tools:
    • MAGpie (free software)
    • Subtitle Workshop (very flexible)
    • Overstream (online tool)
  • 9.
    • Q&A?
    • Please contact me directly for further discussion:
      • John Erskine
      • [email_address]